(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Bulletin of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina"

THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY of 
NORTH CAROLINA 

BULLETIN 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 19364937 
Announcements for 1937-1938 



PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES DURING THE YEAR 

IN JANUARY, FEBRUARY, APRIL, AND NOVEMBER 

BY THE COLLEGE 

AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY of 
NORTH CAROLINA 

BULLETIN 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1936-1937 
Announcements for 1937-1938 



THE 

FORTY-FIFTH 

SESSION 



ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER AT THE POST OFFICE 
AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA, FEBRUARY 24, 193 6 

UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1913 



1936 


1937 


1938 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 81 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

28 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 2122 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 


12 8 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

18 1415 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 81 


12 8 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 1112 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 80 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 8 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 
3 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 80 
31 


1 2 

8 4 6 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 8 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 80 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 81 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 1112 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

18 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 910 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1937 
June 5, 6, 7 
June 9 

July 17 
July 19 

August 27 
September 13 
September 14 
September 15 

September 16 

September 17 

September 18 
September 24 
October 5 
November 25 
December 18 

1938 
January 4 
January 21 
January 22-28 
January 31-Feb. 

February 2 
February 8 
April 2 
April 11 
May 10 
May 27 
May 28-June 3 
June 4, 5, 6 



Saturday, Sunday, Monday. Commencement. 

Wednesday. Registration for First Summer Ses- 
sion. 

Saturday. First Summer Session ends. 

Monday. Registration for Second Summer Ses- 
sion. 

Friday. Second Summer Session ends. 

Monday, 6:30 P.M. Meeting of the Faculty. 

Tuesday, 9 :00 A.M. Freshman Week begins. 

Wednesday. Examinations for removal of con- 
ditions and for advanced standing. 

Thursday. Registration of Freshman and Com- 
mercial Students. 

Friday. Registration of Former and Transfer 

Students. 
Saturday. Work of First Semester begins. 
Friday. Last day for changes in courses. 
Tuesday. Founder's Day. 
Thursday. Thanksgiving Holiday. 

Saturday. Christmas Recess begins at 11:05 
A. M. 

Tuesday. Class work resumed at 8 :15 A.M. 

Friday. Reading Day. 

Saturday through Friday. Examinations. 

Monday and Tuesday. Registration for Second 

Semester. 
Wednesday. Work of Second Semester begins. 
Tuesday. Last day for changes in courses. 
Saturday. Spring Recess begins at 11 :05 A. M. 
Monday. Class work resumed at 8:15 A. M. 
Tuesday. Senior Day. \ Q^flO'S 
Friday. Reading Day. 
Saturday through Friday. Examinations. 
Saturday, Sunday, Monday. Commencement. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

The Board of Trustees 5 

Administrative Council of the University 9 

The Faculty 10 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 26 

The College 28 

Buildings and Grounds 29 

The Library 35 

Student Health Service 36 

Community Life 37 

Organizations and Clubs 39 

Publications 41 

Public Relations 42 

Expenses 43 

Loan Funds, Fellowships, and Scholarships 46 

Admission 50 

Requirements for Bachelor's Degree 54 

Registration 65 

Academic Regulations 65 

Courses of Instruction 71 

The School of Music 143 

The Commercial Department 152 

Degrees Conferred, 1936 155 

Enrollment Summary, 1936-1937 160 

Index 161 



TRUSTEES 

Clyde Eoark Hoey, Governor, President ex officio of the Board of 

Trustees. 
Clyde Atkinson Erwin, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Member ex officio of the Board of Trustees. 

Henry Mauger London, Secretary of the Board. 
THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

fl939 

Mrs. Kate P. Arrington - Warrenton 

H. D. Bateman .Wilson 

C. T. Council Durham 

Burton Craige Winston-Salem 

John Gilmer Dawson Kinston 

Frank Lemuel Dunlap Wadesboro 

Joseph McDowell Gamewell Lexington 

Oliver Max Gardner Washington, D. 0. 

Alexander Hawkins Graham Hillsboro 

Harry Percy Grier, Jr +. .Statesville 

Luther Thompson Hartsell Concord 

John Wetmore Hinsdale Ealeigh 

George Lafayette Lyerly Hickory 

Isaac Melson Meekins , Elizabeth City 

William Daniel Merritt Roxboro 

Walter Murphy Salisbury 

Haywood Parker Asheville 

Reuben B. Robertson Canton 

Henry Moring Robins Asheboro 

Peter Brown Ruffin - Wilmington 

George Stephens Asheville 

Frederick Isler Sutton , Kinston 

Charles Whedbee Hertford 

William Coleman Woodard Rocky Mount 

William H. Woolard Greenville 

fl941 

Miss Annie Moore Cherry * Roanoke Rapids 

Hayden Clement Salisbury 

t The legal term of office expires April 1 of the year indicated. 



6 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Josephus Daniels — .. Raleigh 

C. C. Efihd Albemarle 

J. C. B. Ehkinghatjs Raleigh 

Reuben Oscar Everett Durham 

William D. Faucette Norfolk, Virginia 

Richard Tillman Fountain Rocky Mount 

Jones Fuller „ Durham 

James Alexander Gray ^ Winston-Salem 

Junius Daniel Grimes..u Washington 

William Tucker Hannah Waynesville 

R. L. Harris Roxboro 

Robert Eugene Little ... Wadesboro 

Mrs. Lily 0. Morehead Mebane Spray 

Cameron Morrison ^ Charlotte 

Harriss Newman Wilmington 

Clarence Poe _ Raleigh 

J. Hawley Poole ....West End 

MissEasdale Shaw -. ...Rockingham 

James Franklin Spruill *. Lexington 

Mrs. May Lovelace Tomlinson .....High Point 

Irvin Burchard Tucker -Whiteville 

John Kenyon Wilson Elizabeth City 

Graham Woodard Wilson 

fl943 

Alexander Boyd Andrews Raleigh 

Dudley Bagley . Moyock 

Walter D. Barbee Seaboard 

Kemp Davis Battle Rocky Mount 

James Albert Bridger. Bladenboro 

Mrs. Minnie McIver Brown ..Chadbourn 

Charles F. Cates Mebane 

Richard Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem 

William Grimes Clark Tarboro 

Authur Mills Dixon Gastonia 

Rufus Alexander Doughton Sparta 

Thomas C. Hoyle, Jr... _ Greensboro 

Robert Grady Johnson Burgaw 

A. Hall Johnston Asheville 

Charles Andrew Jonas Lincolnton 



fThe legal term of office expires April 1 of the year indicated. 



Trustees 

Kemp Plummer Lewis... _ ~ Durham 

AbthurH. London - Pittsboro 

Mes. E. L. McKee Sylva 

James Edwaed Millis „ ~ High Point 

Andrew L. Monroe - Raleigh 

KjempB. JSTixon ~ Lincolntou 

John Johnston Pareeb . Charlotte 

Richard J. Reynolds - Winston-Salem 

Miss Lelia Styeon 3Tew Bern 

Samuel F. Teagub. — .... Goldsboro 

fl945 

J. L. Becton _ .Wilmington 

Sam M. Blount Washington 

Victor S. Bryant Durham 

John W. Clark...„ Franklinville 

Mrs. Laura Weill Cone... Greensboro 

Henry Groves Connor .Wilson 

Isaac P. Davis Manteo 

Carl Thomas Durham Chapel Hill 

R. R. Eagle JSTew Bern 

J. B. Fearing Windsor 

A. D. Folger Mount Airy 

George C. Green L Weldon 

Edwin Clarke Gregory Salisbury 

John Sprunt Hill Durham 

Henry L. Ingram Asheboro 

Benjamin Kittrell Lassitee Oxford 

Mrs. Daisy Hanes Lassitee Charlotte 

Henry M. London Raleigh 

George B. Mason Gastonia 

Edwin Pate Laurel Hill 

James C. Pittman Sanford 

J. Benton Stacy Ruffin 

Kenneth S. Tanner Spindale 

Leslie Weil Goldsboro 

Francis D. Winston Windsor 

t The legal term of office expires April 1 of the year indicated. 



8 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE TRUSTEES 

Clyde Roark Hoey, ex officio, Chairman. 

Henry Mauger London, ex officio, Secretary. 

J1938 : Charles Whedbee, William D. Paucette, Leslie Weil. 

J 1940 : John Sprunt Hill, Walter Murphy, John J. Parker. 

J1942: Mrs. Laura Weill Cone, Miss Easdale Shaw, Haywood 
Parker. 

J1944: Josephus Daniels, Clarence Poe, Irvin B. Tucker. 



$Term expires. 



ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President. 

From the Woman's College at Greensboro 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Dean of Administration. 
Helen Barton, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Harriet Elliott, M.A., Professor of Political Science and Dean of 

Women. 
James Albert Highsmith, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
Benjamin B. Kendrick, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

From the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Robert Burton House, B.A., M.A., Dean of Administration. 

Archibald Henderson, Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Kenan Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Allan Wilson Hobbs, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences. 
William Whatley Pierson, Jr., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate 

School. 
William Frederick Prouty, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

From the North Carolina State College of Agriculture 
and Engineering at Raleigh 

John William Harrelson, M.E., Dean of Administration. 
Benjamin Franklin Brown, B.S., Dean of the School of Science 

and Business. 
Hilbert Adam Fisher, M.S., Professor of Mathematics. 

Zeno Payne Metcalf, D.Sc, Professor of Zoology and Director of 
Instruction, School of Agriculture. 

Robert Franklin Poole, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Charles Thomas Woollen, Controller. 



THE FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., President of 
the University. 
University of North Carolina, B.A., 1909; Columbia University, M.A., 
1916; Birmingham-Southern, Davidson, LL.D.; Catawba, D.C.L.; 
Columbia University, D.Litt.; Duke University, LL.D. 

Julius I. Foust, Ph.B., LL.D., President Emeritus. 
University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 1890; LL.D., 1910. 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Dean of Administration. 
Mercer University, B.S., 1900; LL.D., 1926; University of Chicago. 

Harriet "Wiseman Elliott, B.A., M.A., Dean of Women. 
Hanover College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

Laura H. Coit, Secretary of the College. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1896. 

Mary Taylor Moore,, Registrar. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1903. 

Claude Edward Teague, B.A., Assistant Controller. 
University of North Carolina, B.A., 1912. 

E. J. Forney, Treasurer. 

Ruth M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Physician. 

Pomona College, B.A., 1919; University of Pennsylvania, M.D., 1923. 

Guy R. Lyle, B.A., B.S., M.S., Librarian. 

University of Alberta, B.A., 1927; Columbia University, B.S., 1929; 
M.S., 1932. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

ART 

Gregory D. Ivy, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Central Missouri State Teachers College, B.S., 1928; Columbia Uni- 
versity, M.A., 1932. 

Elizabeth McIver Weatherspoon, Associate Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women; Columbia University. 



Faculty h 

Mollie Anne Peterson, Ph.B., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1914; Columbia University, M.A., 1921. 

Alma M. Sparger, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

New York School of Music and Art; Art Students' League, New York; 
Columbia University, B.S., 1924; M.A., 1935. 

Robert M. Skelton, B.S., M.A., Instructor. 

State Teachers College, (Pa.), B.S., 1934; Columbia University, M.A., 
1935. 

ASTRONOMY 

Cornelia Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Cornell University, B.A., 1903; University of Michigan, M.A., 1931. 



BIOLOGY 

John Paul Givler, Ph.B., M.A., Professor. 

Hamline University, B.A., 1906; M.A., 1912; Columbia University. 

Earl H. Hall, B.S., M.S., Professor of Botany. 
University of Chicago, B.S., 1919; M.S., 1920. 

Inez Coldwell, B.A., Associate Professor. 

Southwestern College, B.A., 1915; Johns Hopkins University. 

Archie D. Shaftesbury, B.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Southwestern College (Kan.), B.A., 1920; Johns Hopkins University, 
Ph.D., 1934. 

Helen Ingraham, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor. 

Knox College, B.S., 1918; University of Chicago, M.S., 1921. 

Maude "Williams, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
University of Illinois, B.A., 1924; M.S., 1926. 

Lila Belle Love, M.S., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 
University of Nebraska, M.S., 1921. 

Albert Frederick Thiel, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Botany. 

University of Minnesota, B.A., 1916; University of Nebraska, M.A., 
1917; University of Chicago, Ph.D., 1931. 

Charles Crittenden, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Geography. 
University of Michigan, B.A., 1926; M.A., 1927. 



12 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

*Prances Summerell, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1929; University of 
Pittsburgh, M.A., 1932. 

Lawrence S. Ritchie, M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

Grand Island College, B.A., 1928; Northwestern University, M.A., 
1930; Ph.D., 1936. 

Mary Elizabeth Brummitt, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1933. 

**Madeline Heffner, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935. 

CHEMISTRY 

Florence Louise Schaeffer, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Barnard College, B.A., 1920; Mount Holyoke College, M.A., 1922; 
Yale University. 

Mary M. Petty. B.S., Professor. 

Wellesley College, B.S., 1885; Bryn Mawr College, 1895-1896. 

Elva Eudora Barrow, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1911; University of Chicago, 
M.S., 1923. 

Elizabeth J. Cook, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Mount Holyoke College, B.A., 1931; M.A., 1935. 

***Jean Selbie Peck, B.A., Instructor. 

Mount Holyoke College, B.A., 1931; University of Pennsylvania. 

Mary Welch Parker, B.A., Assistant. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Mary Tyler, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935. 

CLASSICAL, CIVILIZATION 

Charlton C. Jernigan, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Duke University, B.A., 1925; M.A., 1926; Ph.D., 1935. University of 
Chicago. 

Marie B. Denneen, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 
University of Minnesota, B.A., 1912; M.A., 1922. 



* Resigned. 
** Appointed January, 1937. 
*** Second semester. 



Faculty 13 

COMMERCIAL. DEPARTMENT 

Geoege M. Joyce, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Indiana State Teachers College, B.S., 1930; Indiana University, M.S., 
1935. 

Maey Ellis Maeley, Instructor. 

Maey Haeeell, B.A., Instructor. 
Queens College, B.A., 1917. 

Neva H. Bendix, B.S., Instructor. 
University of Minnesota, B.S., 1932. 

ECONOMICS 

Albeet S. Keistee, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Otterbein College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A.. 1911; Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Ph.D., 1927. 

B. Feank Kykee, B.A., B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Berea College, B.A., 1926; University of Tennessee, B.S., 1927; George 
Peabody College, M.A., 1928. 

Claude Edwaed Teague, B.A., Professor. 
University of North Carolina,. B.A., 1912. 

Geoege M. Joyce, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Indiana State Teachers College, B.S., 1930; Indiana University, M.S., 
1935. 

Chaeles J. Shohan, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1930; M.A., 1933; London School 
of Economics; University of Chicago. 

EDUCATION 

John H. Cook, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Ohio Northwestern University, B.S., 1908; Miami, B.A., 1912; Co- 
lumbia University, M.A., 1917; Ph.D., 1925. 

A. P. Kephaet, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Coe College, B.A., 1904; M.A., 1912; University of Pennsylvania, 
Ph.D., 1918. 

Etta K. Spiee, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1895; Columbia 
University, B.S., 1917; M.A., 1921. 

Ruth Fitzgeeald, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1905; Columbia 
University, B.S., 1925; M.A., 1926. 



14 The Woman's College of the University of North Carole* a 

Oliver Perry Clutts, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Ohio University, B.S., 1913; Columbia University, M.A., 1917. 

Herbert Kimmel, Ph.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Indiana University, B.A., 1908; University of Chicago, Ph.M., 1909; 
University of North Carolina, Ph.D., 1935. 

Marie B. Denneen, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 
University of Minnesota, B.A., 1912; M.A., 1922. 

J. A. Smith, B.Ed., M.S., Associate Professor. 

Illinois State Normal University, B.Ed., 1916; University of Illinois, 
M.S., 1926. 

Anna M. Kreimeier, Ph.B., Assistant Professor. 
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1923. 

Betty Aiken Land, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1927; Columbia Uni- 
versity, M.A., 1930. 

Miriam MacFadyen, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1900; Columbia 
University, B.S., 1926; M.A., 1930. 

Anna Reger, B.A., B.S., Assistant Professor and 
Librarian, Training School. 
West Virginia Wesleyan, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, B.S., 1931. 

Mary Fitzgerald, B.A., Assistant Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1908; B.A., 1930. 

Harriett Mehaffie, Ph.B., Assistant Professor. 
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1926. 

Ruth Gunter, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1925; Columbia 
University, M.A., 1930. 

Helen Krug, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Eastern State Teachers College (S. Dak.), B.S., 1927; Columbia Uni- 
versity, M.A., 1931. 

Eunice Ann Lloyd, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Wellesley College, B.A., 1925; Columbia University, M.A., 1931. 

Margaret Flintom, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

George Peabody College for Teachers, B.A., 1925; M.A., 1928. 

Geraldine Ladd, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

University of Iowa, B.A., 1925; M.A., 1933; Alliance Franchise, Paris. 



Faculty 15 

ENGLISH 

William C. Smith, Ph.B., L.H.D., Professor of English Language 
and Literature. 
University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 1896; L.H.D., 1920. 

Alonzo 0. Hall, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Elon College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

"William Eaymond Taylor, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

University of North Carolina, BA., 1915; Harvard University, M.A., 
1916. 

Leonard B. Hurley, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Duke University, B.A., 1913; M.A., 1916; University of North Caro- 
lina, Ph.D., 1932. 

J. Arthur Dunn, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

University of Missouri, B.A., 1908; M.A., 1909, 

Mildred Eutherford Gould, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1907; M.A., 1921. 

Abigail E. Eowley, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Denison University, B.A., 1915; Columbia University, M.A., 1921. 

George P. Wilson, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1913; Columbia University, MA., 
1919; University of Wisconsin. 

Nettie S. Tillett, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Duke University, B.A., 1913; Columbia University, M.A., 1924. 

James W. Painter, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Emory and Henry College, B.A., 1920; University of Tennessee, M.A., 
1923. 

Jane Summerell, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1910; 1922; Columbia 
University, M.A., 1924. 

May Dulaney Bush, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Hollins College, B.A., 1923; Columbia University, M.A., 1928. 

Elbert E. Moses, Jr., M.S., Ph.D., Instructor. 

University of Pittsburgh, B.A., 1932; University of Michigan, M.S., 
1934; Ph.D., 1936. 

Charlotte Kohler, M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

Vassar College, B.A., 1929; University of Virginia, M.A., 1933; Ph.D., 
1936. 

Frances Honnet Stern, B.A., Assistant in Dramatics. 
Vassar College, B.A., 1936. 



16 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

GERMAN 

Caroline B. Schoch, Ph.B., M.A., Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1907; University of Marburg, 1907-1908; 
University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1919. 

Kurt Edward Eosinger, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

University of Michigan, B.A., 1923; M.A., 1924; Harvard University, 
Ph.D., 1928. 

Amelia C. Altvater, B.A., Instructor. 
University of Michigan, B.A., 1920. 

HEALTH 

Medical Division 

Ruth M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Physician and Professor of 
Hygiene. 
Pomona College, B.A., 1919; University of Pennsylvania, M.D., 1923. 

Anna M. Gove, M.D., Physician and Professor of Hygiene. 

Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, M.D., 1892. 

Maria S. Naples, M.D., Assistant Physician. 

The University of Buffalo Medical School, M.D., 1934. 

Hygiene 

Victoria Carlsson, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Columbia University, B.Sc, 1922; M.Sc, M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 1929. 

Mildred Pearl Harris, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 
University of Michigan, B.A., 1921; M.A., 1924. 

Anne Shamburger, Instructor. 

Guilford College; Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and 
Public Health. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

History 

Benjamin B. Kendrick, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Mercer University, B.S., 1905; M.A., 1911; Columbia University, 
Ph.D., 1914. 

Alex Matthews Arnett, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Mercer University, B.A., 1908; Columbia University, M.A., 1913; 
Ph.D., 1922. 

Clarence D. Johns, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Randolph-Macon College, B.A., 1908; Chicago University, M.A., 1911. 



Faculty 17 

Magnhilde Gullander, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Wisconsin, B.A., 1916; University of Pennsylvania, 
M.A., 1925. 

Vera Largent, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Knox College, B.A., 1915; University of Chicago, M.A., 1923. 

Bernice Evelyn Draper, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Lawrence College, B.A., 1919; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1922. 

Josephine Hege, B.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1927; Yale University. 

Katharine Moser, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1933; 
University of Chicago, M.A., 1934. 

Eugene E. Pfaff, M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1930; M.A., 1934; Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ph.D., 1936. 

JKathleen T. Pfaff, B.A., Instructor. 
Coker College, B.A., 1928. 

Political Science 

Harriet Wiseman Elliott, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Hanover College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

Louise Brevard Alexander, B.A., Assistant Professor. 

Presbyterian College, B.A., 1907; University of Tennessee; Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Margaret Messenger Edwards, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Montana State College, B.S., 1912; Columbia University, M.A., 1920; 
Cornell University; University of Chicago. 

Viva M. Playfoot, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1925; M.A., 1931. 

Blanche Tansil, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Institutional 
Management. 

University of Tennessee, B.S., 1921; George Peabody College for 
Teachers, M.A., 1927. 

Flora White Edwards, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Guilford College, B.S., 1911; George Peabody College, B.S., 1916; Uni- 
versity of Chicago, M.S., 1934. 



First semester. 



18 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Madeleine Blakey Street, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

College of William and Mary, B.S., 1922; Columbia University, M.A., 
1931. 

Bess Naylor Bosa, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

University of Missouri, B.S., 1914; M.A., 1917; Merrill Palmer 
School. 

Harriet Alice Naumann, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor. 
Grinnell College, B.A., 1929; Iowa State College, M.S., 1932. 

Agnes 1ST. Coxe, B.S., M.A., Instructor. 

Flora MacDonald College, B.L., 1919; The North Carolina College for 
Women, B.S., 1927; Columbia University, M.A., 1930. 

Emeve Paul Singletary, B.S., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1932; Merrill Palmer 
School. 

Mary Edith York, B.S., M.S., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1922; Iowa State Col- 
lege, M.S., 1932. 

MATHEMATICS 

Helen Barton, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1913; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1922; 
Ph.D., 1926. 

Cornelia Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Cornell University, B.A., 1903; University of Michigan, M.A., 1931. 

Emily Holmes "Watkins, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, 
M.A., 1926. 

MUSIC 

H. Hugh Altvater, B.A., Mus.M., Professor of Music and Dean of 

the School of Music. 

University of Michigan, B.A., 1920; Southwestern College, Mus.M., 
1925; University of Michigan, Mus.M., 1929. 

Wade B. Brown, Mus.D., Professor of Music. 

Diploma, New England Conservatory of Music, 1890; Wake Forest 
College, Mus.D., 1922. 

George M. Thompson, M.Mus., Professor of Organ. 

Beaver College (Pa.), B.Mus., 1915; M.Mus., 1920; Pittsburgh Mu- 
sical Institute and Chicago College of Music; Pupil of Clarence Eddy 
of Chicago and Joseph Bonnet of Paris. 



Faculty 19 

Henry H. Fuchs, B.A., B.Mus., Professor of Music Theory. 

College of City of New York, B.A., 1906; Columbia University, B.Mus., 
1910. 

Alleine Eichaed Minor, B.S., Associate Professor of Piano. 

New England Conservatory of Music; Columbia University, B.S., 1930. 

Mary Lois Ferrell, Associate Professor of Piano. 

Northwestern University; Student of Ernest Hutcheson and Emil 
Sauer. 

Grace Van Dye:e More, B.Mus., M.S., Associate Professor of Public 
School Music. 
University of Illinois, B.Mus., 1922; M.S., 1931. 

Sue Kyle Southwick, Instructor. 

Diploma, New England Conservatory of Music, 1918. 

Dorothy Lee Clement, B.S., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1923. 

Edythe D. Schneider, B.M., Instructor. 
Bush Conservatory, B.M., 1930. 

Birdie Helen Holloway, B.S., M.S., Instructor. 
Oberlin College Conservatory, B.S., 1926; M.S., 1931. 

Herbert Eichard Hazelman, B.A., Instructor. 
University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Kurt Edward Eosinger, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

University of Michigan, B.A., 1923; M.A., 1924; Harvard University, 
Ph.D., 1928. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mary Channino Coleman, B.S., Professor. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1917; Wellesley College. 

Hope Tisdale, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Barnard College, B.A., 1925; Diploma, Central School of Hygiene and 
Physical Education, 1927; New York University, M.A., 1935. 

Aldace Fitzwater, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1928; M.A., 1935. 

Ethel L. Martus, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Brown University, B.A., 1929; Wellesley College, M.S., 1931. 



20 Th e Woman's College of the Univeksity of North Carolina 

Chkistine White, B.S., Instructor. 

Boston School of Physical Education; Boston University, B.S., 1935. 

Dorothy Davis, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Western College, B.A., 1928; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1930„ 

Edith Vail, B.S., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1931; Dalcroze Insti- 
tute; Bennington School of the Dance. 

Herbert W. Park, Assistant. 

Springfield College; Columbia University. 

PHYSICS 

Calvin ~N. Warfield, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Johns Hopkins University, B.E., 1923; M.A., 1925; Ph.D., 1926. 

John A. Tiedeman, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Union College, B.S., 1926; M.S., 1928; University of Virginia, Ph.D., 
1931. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

James Albert Highsmith, M.A., Ph.D., Professor 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1910; M.A., 1915; George Peabody 
College for Teachers, Ph.D., 1923. 

William Woodrow Martin, Ph.B., M.A., Professor. 
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1904; M.A., 1922. 

Key L. Barkley, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Berea College, B.A., 1926; University of North Carolina, M.A., 1927; 
Ph.D., 1930. 

Bennie Lee Craig, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Winfield S. Barney, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Dartmouth College, B.A., 1905; Hobart College, M.A., 1911; Syracuse 
University, Ph.D., 1916. 

George A. Underwood, M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

University of Missouri, B.A., 1905; M.A., 1906; Harvard University, 
Ph.D., 1914; Sorbonne, University of Paris, 1911-1912. 

Malcolm K. Hooke, B.A., D. de l'Univ., Professor. 

University of Chattanooga, B.A., 1918; Sorbonne, Diplome d'etudes de 
Civilisation francaise, 1921; Docteur de l'Universite de Paris, 1926. 



Faculty 21 

Jessie C. Laied, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Mount Holyoke College, B.A., 1906; University of Michigan, M.A., 
1909; University of Marburg, Alliance Frangaise, Paris; University of 
Poitiers; Officier d'Academie. 

Meta Helena Millee, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1917; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1919; 
Ph.D., 1922; Certificate d'etudes pratiques de prononciation fran- 
gaise. Institut de phonetique, Universite de Paris, 1931. 

Rene Haedee, Associate Professor. 

C.E.N. Angers, 1908; University of Caen; C.A.P. Rennes, 1911; 
Professorat des Ecoles Normales, Paris, 1919; University of London; 
University of Edinburgh; Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur; Officier 
de l'lnstruction Publique. 

Augustine LaBochelle, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Vermont, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, M.A., 1921; 
Diploma, Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 

Alice Katheeine Abbott, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Smith College, B.A., 1921; University of Illinois, M.A., 1927; Centro 
de Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 

Helen Feances Cutting, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Adelphi College, B.A., 1921; Columbia University, M.A., 1930; Uni- 
versity of Chicago, M.A., 1933; Certificate, Centro de Estudios, His- 
toricos, Madrid. 

Virginia Cheistian Faeinholt, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

College of William and Mary, B.A., 1928; University of Chicago, M.A., 
1930; Ph.D., 1936; Alliance Frangaise, Paris. 

Katheeine Tayloe, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1928; Radcliffe College, 
M.A., 1929. 

Annie Beam Fundeebuek, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1916; University of 
North Carolina, M.A., 1934. 



SCERETARIAL SCIENCE 

B. Feank Kykee, B.A., B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Berea College, B.A., 1926; University of Tennessee, B.S., 1927; George 
Peabody College, M.A., 1928. 

Patty Speuill, B.S., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1912; B.A., 1926. 



22 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

*Hiram G. Cobb, B.S., M.A., Instructor. 

Whitewater College, B.S., 1930; University of Iowa, M.A., 1935. 

**Clyde W. Humphrey, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

State Teachers College (Ky.), B.A., 1930; George Peabody Col- 
lege, M.A., 1934. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Glenn E. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Reed College, B.A., 1915; Columbia University, M.A., 1916. 

Lyda Gordon Shivers, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

University of Mississippi, B.A., 1928; M.A., 1930; University of North 
Carolina, Ph.D., 1935. 

Downing Eubank Proctor, Ph.B., M.A., Instructor. 

Denison University, Ph.B., 1923; Brown University, M.A., 1924. 

THE LIBRARY 

Guy E. Lyle, B.A., B.S., M.S., Librarian. 

University of Alberta, B.A., 1927; Columbia University, B.S., 1929; 
M.S., 1932. 

E. Elizabeth Sampson, B.S., Head Cataloguer. 
Simmons College, B.S., 1918. 

Virginia Trumper, In Charge of Periodicals. 

Denison University; Louisville Public Library Training Class. 

Sub Vernon Williams, B.A., M.A., Reference Librarian. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1919; M.A., 1922; Carnegie 
Library School (Atlanta), Certificate, 1922. 

*Kathryn Price Tiedeman, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Head of Circulation 
Department. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926; The North Caro- 
lina College for Women, B.A. in Library Science, 1931. 

Marjorie Hood, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Head of Circulation 
Department. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926; Emory Univer- 
sity, B.A., in Library Science, 1936. 

Minnie Middleton Hussey, B.A., Readers' Adviser. 

Meredith College, B.A., 1911; The North Carolina College for Women, 
B.A., 1930. 



* Resigned. 
** Appointed November, 1936. 



Faculty 23 

Mary Ruth Angle, Circulation Department. 
Converse College. 

Treva "Wilkerson, B.A., Circulation Department. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1933. 

Ruth Worley, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant Cataloguer. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935; 
The University of North Carolina, B.A. in Library Science, 1936. 

Sarah Gardner Seagle, B.A., Order Assistant and Secretary to the 
Librarian. 
The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1933. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Charles Wiley Phillips, B.A., M.A., Director of Public Relations. 
University of North Carolina, B.A., 1921; Columbia University, M.A., 
1927. 

Edith Harbour, B.A., Publications Office. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1930; The University 
of North Carolina. 

COUNSELORS 

Anne Eulton Carter, B.A., Counselor in Spencer Hall. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1921. 

** Alice Dunlap, B.A., Counselor in Hinshaw Hall. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1936. 

Virginia Christian Earinholt, M.A., Ph.D., Counselor in 
Bailey Hall. ^ 

College of William and Mary, B.A., 1928; University of Chicago, M.A., 
1930; Ph.D., 1936; Alliance Francaise, Paris. 

Annie Beam Funderburk, B.A., M.A., Counselor in Mary Foust 
Hall. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1916; University of 
North Carolina, M.A., 1934. 

Ione H. Grogan, B.A., M.A., Counselor in East Hall. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926; Columbia 
University, M.A., 1928. 

Martha Elizabeth Hathaway, B.S., Counselor in Kirhland Hall. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1925. 



** Appointed January, 1937. 



24 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Josephine Hege, B.A., Counselor in Anna Howard Shaw Hall. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1927; Yale University. 

Ethel Haskin Hunter, Counselor in Gray Hall. 
Diploma, Howard Payne College, 1906. 

Minnie L. Jamison, Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women. 

May Lattimore, Assistant Counselor in Spencer Hall. 

Evelyn Martin, B.A., Counselor in West Hall. 
Georgia State College for Women, B.A., 1930. 

Mary "Welsh Parker, B.A., Counselor in Woman s Hall. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Katherine Sherrill, B.A., Counselor in Cotten Hall. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926. 

*Frances Summerell, B.A., M.A., Counselor in Hinshaw Hall. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1929; University of 
Pittsburgh, M.A., 1932. 

Katherine Taylor, B.A., M.A., Counselor in Guilford Hall. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1928; Radcliffe College, 
M.A., 1929. 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Hope Coolidge, B.S., M.S., Dietitian. 

Salem College, B.A., 1914; Diploma, Battle Creek; Columbia Univer- 
sity, B.S., 1917; M.S., 1921. 

Edna A. Forney, B.A., Assistant Treasurer. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1908; B.A., 1929. 

Mary Alice Tennent, B.A., Assistant Registrar. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1920. 

Estelle Boyd, Supervisor of Dormitories. 
Pratt Institute. 

Clara Booth Byrd, Alumnae Secretary. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1913; 1928. 

Jessie R. McLean, R.N., Nurse. 

Cora Jane Staton, R.N., Nurse. 

Bessie Doub, Assistant Dietitian. 

♦Resigned. 



Faculty 25 

Betty Brown Jester, B.A., Manager of Booh Store and Post 
Office. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

J. M. Sink, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

SECRETARIES AND OFFICE ASSISTANTS 

Hallie Anthony, Department of Public Relations. 

Frances Foster, Office of the Alumnae Secretary. 

Edith Harwood, B.L., Office of the Registrar. 
Berea College, B.L., 1920. 

Kathleen Pettit Hawkins, Office of the Secretary of the College. 

Sara Henry, B.A., Office of the Treasurer. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Annie H. Hughes, Office of the College Physician. 

Elizabeth Kellam, Office of the Class Chairmen. 

May Lattimore, Office of the Secretary of the College. 

Mary Betty Lee, Office of the Principal of Curry Training 
School. 

Edythe Orrell Leslie, Department of Home Economics. 

Lillian Mebane Lovings, Mimeographing Department. 

Eva Cox Melvin, B.L., Department of Education. 

Mildred P. Newton, B.A., Office of the Registrar. 
Goucher College, B.A., 1924. 

Helen Pickard, Office of the Assistant Controller. 

**Elizabeth Yates, B.A., Office of the Dean of Administration. 
The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1936. 



**Appointed January, 1937. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



The Faculty Council. The Faculty Council, meetings of which 
are presided over by the Dean of Administration, is the legis- 
lative body of the College. It is composed of Professors, the 
Chief Administrative Officers, Associate and Assistant Profes- 
sors. The time for regular meetings is the evening of the third 
Monday of each month. 

Advisory Committee. Dean Jackson, Chairman ex officio; Dean 
Elliott, ex officio; Mr. Teague, ex officio; Dr. Cook, Dr. Ken- 
drick, Miss Schaeffer, Miss Jane Summer ell, Dr. Collings, Dr. 
Keister. 

Academic and Personnel Committee. Dean Elliott, Chairman; 
Dr. Miller, Chairman of Class of 1937; Miss Ingraham, Chair- 
man of Class of 1938; Miss Draper, Chairman of Class of 1939; 
Mr. Painter, Chairman of Class of 1940; Dr. Collings, Dr. 
Hurley, Miss Largent, Miss Peterson. 

Admissions. Dr. Barney, Chairman; Miss Coit, Mr. Johns, Miss 
Mary Taylor Moore. 

Committee on Advanced Standing. Miss Strong, Chairman ; Miss 
Rowley, Mr. Johns, Miss Mary Taylor Moore. 

Advisers. Members of the Faculty, under the guidance of the Class 
Chairmen, serve as advisers for all freshman and sophomore 
students. 

Calendar of College Events. Miss Elliott, Chairman ; Miss Row- 
ley, Miss Sherrill. 

College Dramatics. Dr. Kendrick, Chairman ; Miss Edwards, Mr. 
Fuchs, Miss Tisdale, Mr. Ivy. 

Committee on College Publications. Mr. Phillips, Chairman; 
Dr. Arnett, Miss Coleman, Miss Edwards, Miss Ruth Fitz- 
gerald, Mr. Ivy, Miss More, Miss Sampson, Mr. Teague, Miss 
Tillett. 

Committee on Comprehensive Examinations. Miss Schaeffer, 
Chairman; Mr. Painter, Miss Gullander, Dr. Hooke, Miss 
Gunter. 

Concert Committee. Dr. Brown, Chairman; Mr. Thompson, Miss 
Coldwell. 



Standing Committees of the Faculty 27 

Cokaddi Committee. Miss Tillett, Chairman; Dr. Collings, Mr. 
Ivy, Dr. Jernigan. 

Curriculum Committee. Dr. Highsmith, Chairman; Dr. Arnett, 
Dr. Barney, Miss Edwards, Miss Euth Fitzgerald, Mr. A. C. 
Hall, Miss Coleman, Miss SchaefTer, Mr. Thompson. 

Committee on Interdepartmental Majors. Dr. Arnett, Chair- 
man; Dr. Miller, Dr. Warfield. 

Lecture Committee. Dr. Hurley, Chairman ; Miss Alexander, Miss 
Playfoot. 

Library Committee. Dr. Arnett, Chairman; Miss Spier, Miss 
Sampson, Miss Keger, Dr. Underwood. 

Point System Committee. Dr. Tiedeman, Chairman; Dr. Shivers, 
Miss Hege. 

Committee on Proficiency Examinations. Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, 
Chairman; Dr. Thiel, Miss Grace Van Dyke More, Mr. Wilson 
(and one member of the department giving the examination). 

Schedule. Miss Mary Taylor Moore, Chairman; Dr. Highsmith, 
Miss Laird, Miss Gullander. 

Weil Fellowship. Miss Spier, Chairman; Miss SchaefTer, Dr. 
Keister. 

Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Strong, Chairman; Miss Petty, 
Dr. Warfield. 

Social. Miss Petty, Chairman; Miss Elliott, Miss Ferrell, Miss 
Watkins, Miss Minor, Miss MacFadyen. 

NYA Committee. Miss Eowley, Chairman; Dr. Highsmith, Miss 
Playfoot, Miss Coit, Mr. Teague. 

Auditorium. Dr. Shaftesbury, Chairman ; Mr. Kimmel, Mr. Clutts, 
Dr. Hooke. 

Arrival of Students. Mr. Clutts, Chairman; Mr. J. A. Smith. 

Departure of Students. Mr. E. H. Hall, Chairman; Mr. Wilson. 



THE COLLEGE 

HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina was the 
first institution established by the State of North Carolina for the 
higher education of women. The legislation establishing it was en- 
acted in 1891, and the College opened its doors on October 5, 1892. 
The City of Greensboro, which because of its situation near the 
geographical center of the State was particularly suited for the loca- 
tion, secured the new institution by donating a ten-acre site and 
voting bonds to the sum of $30,000 for the erection of its first build- 
ings. 

The College, originally named the State Normal and Industrial 
School and at a later date the North Carolina College for Women, 
came into being as a direct result of a crusade made by Charles 
Duncan Mclver in behalf of the education of women. Other 
pioneers in public school education — notably, Charles B. Aycock, 
Edwin A. Alderman, and James Y. Joyner — came to Dr. Mc- 
Iver's assistance; but to him more than to any other individual the 
College owes its foundation. He became its first president and served 
it until his death in 1906. In that year Dr. Julius I. Foust succeeded 
to the presidency, and upon the foundation laid by Dr. Mclver he 
and his co-workers developed a strong liberal arts college. In 1934, 
Dr. Foust retired from active service and was made President Emeri- 
tus of the Woman's College. At the same time Dr. Walter Clinton 
Jackson, who had long served the College as teacher and vice-presi- 
dent, was elected head of the institution with the title of Dean of 
Administration. 

The College became a part of the University of North Carolina in 
1931, when the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act to 
consolidate the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh, and the 
North Carolina College for Women, into the University of North 
Carolina. By the provisions of this act, the North Carolina College 
for Women on July 1, 1932, became the Woman's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. At that time, also, the Board of Trustees 
chosen by the General Assembly assumed control of the new uni- 
versity, and a few months later they elected Dr. Frank Porter Gra- 
ham its president. 

The growth of the Woman's College has been in every way phenom- 
enal. Although originally its main purpose was that of providing in- 
struction for those expecting to enter the public school system of the 



Buildings and Grounds 29 

State, it lias developed into a liberal arts college respected in all aca- 
demic circles. For years its graduates have been accorded full mem- 
bership in the American Association of University Women, and in 
1934 it was awarded a section of Phi Beta Kappa. The College now 
offers liberal courses in the arts and sciences and in music ; and at the 
same time it has continued to give teacher training and instruction in 
commercial branches, in home economics, and in other subjects the 
mastery of which will enable women to become self-supporting. The 
expansion in a physical way has been no less notable. From a stu- 
dent body of 223 and a Faculty of 15 the College has grown into one 
of the largest colleges for women in the country, with a plant valued 
at more than $6,000,000. 

The College holds membership in the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools, the American Council on Education, 
the Association of North Carolina Colleges, and the American Asso- 
ciation of Colleges. 

The College confers five degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science in Home Economics, Bachelor of Science in Music, Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Education, and Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Administration. The College is organized into the Liberal 
Arts College and the School of Music. The Liberal Arts College 
consists of the following divisions and departments: Languages and 
Literature, Social Studies, Mathematics and Pure Science, Home 
Economics and Education. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina is a 
part of the public school system of the State. As a state institution 
it desires to be of the greatest possible service to the entire people of 
North Carolina, and its advantages are open on similar terms to all. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Since its establishment the College has made steady progress in 
material equipment, so that today the property comprises more than 
one hundred acres of improved and wooded land, forty-five buildings, 
and ample room for recreational activities. The monetary valuation 
of the entire college plant is more than $6,000,000. 
^ The Administration Building (1892) houses the chief administra- 
tive offices. The Dean of Administration, the Secretary, the Treas- 
urer, the Eegistrar, the Assistant Controller, the Class Chairmen, 
and the Dean of Women have their offices there. On the second 
floor are class rooms and faculty offices. 



30 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Little Guilford Hall (1895) now houses the Department of Public 
Relations and is headquarters for student-help, placement, exten- 
sion, and publicity work. 

Students' Building (1901) contains an assembly hall with a seating 
capacity of eight hundred, society halls and rooms, offices of the 
Young Women's Christian Association, the book store, the post 
office, and store rooms for various student organizations. 

The Dining Rooms (1904), three large halls with a capacity of 
eighteen hundred, are connected through a large central serving room 
with the kitchens and cold storage plant. 

The Library (1905 — rebuilt in 1933 after a disastrous fire) has a 
capacity of 125,000 volumes and 400 readers. Room is provided for 
further expansion. Every facility is provided the inquiring and 
diligent student, whether she wishes to read casually or to engage in 
research. 

Mclver Building (1908), named in honor of the founder and first 
president of the College, contains one hundred and twenty-six lecture 
rooms, laboratories, and offices. 

The Infirmary (1912) contains fifty beds for students; offices for 
consultation, examination, and dispensary treatment; and a resi- 
dence for nurses. 

The Home Management House (1921), for students in the Depart- 
ment of Home Economics, is equipped to give practical training in 
housekeeping, home-making, and the care of the house. 

The Outdoor Gymnasium (1922), designed originally as an emer- 
gency arrangement, has a floor 50x90, with adequate athletic appa- 
ratus, including a marked-off basketball court. 

The Physical Education Building (1923), in addition to a main 
gymnasium and two smaller gymnasia, contains various rooms for 
lecture and remedial purposes, offices for instructors, examination and 
rest rooms, a swimming pool, a storage room, and dressing and shower 
booths. 

The Music Building (1924) contains a recital hall, sixteen class 
rooms, nine offices, and fifty practice rooms. 

Aycock Auditorium (1926) seats nearly 3,000 persons. The 
building contains, in addition to the large auditorium, reception 
rooms, cloak rooms, offices of the Director of Dramatics and his as- 
sistants, and an assembly room for meetings of the Play-Likers. 
Under the stage there is a large laboratory which is used by classes 
in play production as well as by the dramatic organization. 

Curry Building (1926) houses the Training School and the School 
of Education. There are numerous rooms for college classes and for 



Buildings and Grounds 31 

the grades, a large demonstration room, an auditorium seating about 
five hundred, and many offices. It is one of the largest and most 
handsomely equipped buildings on the campus, affording splendid 
facilities not only for the college classes, but for practice teaching in 
the grades and high school. 

The Home Economics Building (1927) contains four class rooms 
and seven laboratories; nursery school rooms; an animal experi- 
mental laboratory; a general lecture room accommodating about 300 
people; a cafeteria, cafeteria kitchen and store room, and a private 
dining room for teaching Institutional Management; a reception 
room; and eight offices. 

Alumnae House (1935) contains a reception hall, living room, 
library, four bedrooms, serving kitchen and pantry, alumnae com- 
mittee room and class headquarters; offices for the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation, for the student publications, for the Student Government 
Association, and an attractive assembly hall for student clubs. Stand- 
ing on the ground formerly occupied by Old Guilford Hall, the house 
is of colonial architecture and is available for use for official alum- 
nae and college functions. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

There are twelve residence halls on the campus. In each hall there 
is a Counselor to whom the students may go for advice and from 
whom they obtain permissions relating to social activities in accord- 
ance with the regulations of the College. 

The rooms in the halls are comfortably fitted up for students. 
Only single beds are used. Each student is expected to bring for her 
own use the following: a pillow, bed linen, blankets (two pairs), bed- 
spreads, towels, a drinking glass, and a teaspoon. 

Spencer Hall (1904) offers accommodations for three hundred and 

twenty students. 

"Woman's Hall (1912) was dedicated by the General Assembly of 
North Carolina to the Women of the Confederacy. It accommo- 
dates fifty-six students. 

Kirkland Hall (1914), named for Miss Sue May Kirkland, the 
first Lady Principal of the College, accommodates fifty-six students. 

Anna Howard Shaw Hall (1920) contains rooms for one hundred 
and four students. 

Gray Hall (1921), named for Mr. Robert T. Gray, a member of 
the Board of Directors of the College from 1900 to 1912, affords 
accommodations for one hundred and twenty-two. 



32 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Bailey Hall (1922), named for Mr. T. B. Bailey, a member of the 
Board of Directors of the College from 1902 to 1916, contains rooms 
for one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Cotten Hall (1922), named for Mrs. Sally Southall Cotten, accom- 
modates one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Hinshaw Hall (1922), named for Colonel G. "W. Hinshaw, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of the College from 1910 to 1918, offers 
accommodations for one hundred and twenty-two students. 

East Hall (1923) has accommodations for one hundred and twenty- 
two students. 

West Hall (1923) also accommodates one hundred and twenty-two 
students. 

Mary Foust Hall (1927) was named by the alumnae of the College 
in memory of the daughter of President Emeritus Foust. It con- 
tains rooms for one hundred and forty-six students. 

Guilford Hall (1927) is a duplicate of Mary Foust. 

In addition to the buildings named above, the College owns a num- 
ber of service and residence buildings. 

ATHLETIC GROUNDS 

The athletic fields include twelve tennis courts; soccer, hockey, 
and baseball fields; archery range; and play space for minor team 
games and individual sports. The Athletic Association cabin, six 
miles from the city, is open to members of the Association for week- 
end camping groups. 

OUTDOOR THEATRE 

There is an outdoor theatre in Peabody Park where a hillside, tall 
native trees, and a small stream form a natural ampitheatre of 
dignity and beauty which is used as a setting for traditional ser- 
vices. 



LABORATORIES 

BIOLOGY LABORATORIES 

The laboratories of the Department of Biology include one large 
well-equipped room for the general or beginning course; two for 
Botany; two for Zoology; and one each for Physiology and Bacteri- 
ology. Two preparation rooms for the general Biology and Physi- 
ology courses, a dark room, and four stock-rooms are also part of the 
physical equipment of the department. Special apparatus includes 



Laboratories 33 

microtomes, sterilizers, electrical refrigerators, paraffin baths, basal 
metabolism equipment, an incinerator, and an incubator room with, 
electric heat and automatic control. The Department has nearly two 
hundred compound microscopes, also binoculars and immersion 
lenses. Museum material and special equipment for advanced courses 
are also provided. A small marine laboratory at Beaufort, North 
Carolina, is available during the summer for work by students and 
faculty. 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES 

One large laboratory is furnished with all necessary individual 
and special equipment for courses in General Chemistry. Two 
smaller laboratories are equally well equipped for work in Analytical, 
Organic, Physiological, Food and Physical Chemistry. In connec- 
tion with these are a stock room providing space for apparatus and 
chemical supplies, a preparation room, a balance room with a num- 
ber of fine balances for analytical work, lecture rooms, and offices. 

HOME ECONOMICS LABORATORIES 

The Home Economics Department has well-equipped laboratories 
for the study of food and nutrition, clothing and textiles, applied art, 
household management and equipment, child development, and insti- 
tutional management. The food and nutrition laboratory is equipped 
and arranged on the block plan. The meal study laboratory is 
equipped and arranged on the unit kitchen and dining service plan. 
The clothing and textile laboratories are equipped with the latest 
models of machines and other up-to-date material and testing equip- 
ment. The nursery school rooms and playground are used as labora- 
tories in child study. The home management house is furnished and 
equipped so that the latest developments in household management 
are studied and practiced. The institutional management labora- 
tories represent the latest developments in cafeteria kitchen and 
dining service equipment. 

PHYSICS LABORATORIES 

The general laboratory is a large, well-furnished room provided 
with all necessary equipment for courses in General Physics. A 
smaller laboratory room is equipped for advanced, specialized courses. 
In connection are a dark room, a large lecture ampitheatre, a prep 
aration room, apparatus rooms, a mechanician's shop, and offices. 
The laboratories and lecture table are equipped with pipe lines for 
gas, compressed air, and vacuum, and are wired for distribution 
from a switchboard of direct current from storage batteries and 
dynamo, and of alternating current. There is also an X-ray labora- 



34 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

tory with hospital-type equipment and with a special dark room 
adjoining. 

PLAY PRODUCTION LABORATORY 

A large room in the basement of Aycock Auditorium is used by 
students in play production for designing, constructing, and painting 
scenery; for sewing stage curtains and draperies; for experimenting 
in stage lighting and theatrical make-up; and for rehearsing plays. 
The ceiling is a network of blocks, pulleys, and lines for hoisting 
scenery and for setting the room as a stage for rehearsals. There are 
a big tailor's sewing machine capable of taking the heaviest fabrics 
and a paint frame of scenic drops covering one entire end of the 
room. A set of carpenter's tools, a work-bench, and similar equip- 
ment serve in the construction of scenery frames. Modern stage 
electrical equipment of every type is used in the lighting experi- 
ments. The laboratory is a combination scenic studio and experi- 
mental workshop. 

PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORIES 

The psychology laboratories include a large room suitable for sec- 
tions in elementary and advanced laboratory courses, a special room 
for mental testing or clinical examinations, a combined apparatus 
room and shop, and adjoining lecture rooms. These laboratories are 
equipped with furniture and apparatus suitable for use in the labora- 
tory courses. There is also equipment for use in the study of special 
problems and for class demonstration. The testing room is equipped 
with materials needed in the common mental testing procedures. The 
equipment for testing children is especially adequate. 

HISTORICAL MUSEUM 

The Department of History is collecting material for an Historical 
Museum or Hall of History. Through the cooperation of the late 
Colonel F. A. Olds of the Hall of History, Ealeigh, North Carolina, 
a good beginning has been made in this work. Colonel Olds presented 
to the Museum several hundred valuable and interesting articles. The 
students of the College and others have also contributed liberally to 
the collection, so that there are now more than five hundred relics. 
Glass cases are provided, and articles are carefully protected. 

The collection contains valuable Indian relics, an especially val- 
uable collection of Colonial currency, Confederate money, objects 
illustrating the manners and customs of the people, rare pictures and 
books, pamphlets, old newspapers, war and other relics. It is the 
intention of those fostering the museum to make a specialty of 
articles illustrating the life and work of the women of North Caro- 
lina. 



THE LIBRARY 

The Library, completely remodeled and enlarged after the fire of 
September, 1932, is designed to serve the cultural needs of the col- 
lege community as well as the purely academic assignments of the 
classroom. It has a present seating capacity of about 400 and a 
book capacity of approximately 100,000 volumes. 

The book collection now numbers 73,551 volumes. Approximately 
4,000 volumes are added annually through purchase and gift. The 
reference collection contains all the standard general reference sets 
as well as many of the specialized reference works in different fields. 
Approximately 447 purchased periodicals, 132 gift periodicals, and 
19 newspaper subscriptions supplement the resources of the book 
collection. The Library has a small working collection of books on 
North Carolina history and literature but makes no attempt to du- 
plicate the extensive collection at Chapel Hill. Plans are now well 
on the way for developing a special collection in all matters pertain- 
ing to women. Being a woman's college library, it is logical that the 
library should start developing in a direction which will ultimately 
benefit not only the students on the campus but the women of the 
state. 

Worthy of special note is an exceptionally attractive Reading 
Room on the second floor in the north wing, which is devoted to the 
encouragement of cultural, recreational, and inspirational reading. 

For the convenience of the students, an open-shelf system is used 
in the Reserve Room where the many assigned and suggested supple- 
mentary readings are available. A similar plan is used in the tem- 
porary Social Science Reading Room where all the readings for the 
freshman Social Science course are shelved. It is informally fur- 
nished with easy chairs, sofas, and floor lamps, giving the effect of a 
home library. This room contains the fiction collection, now num- 
bering approximately 2,800 volumes. Grouped here, also are the 
selected collections of philosophy, religion, sociology, science, 
art, literature, travel, history, and biography chosen from 
the general collection by the Readers' Adviser. Here also are held 
interesting exhibits of books, pictures and other works of art, 
student library prize competitions, and occasional informal talks. 
These talks may be reviews of books, critical estimates of authors, 
or readings from plays and poetry of current interest. Statistics 
show an increasing appreciation of this feature of the library's 
work. Whatever their interest, students are seeking good reading 
in greater numbers than ever before and the library believes their 
zeal is worth encouraging. Every effort is made to create here an 
atmosphere of bookish informality. 

As a part of the extension work of the College, the library offers 
its services to the people of the State, particularly to teachers and 



36 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

alumnae. "With the cooperation of the faculty on technical and 
highly specialized subjects, it acts as an information bureau in an- 
swering questions. In addition, it sends out books on many subjects, 
especially women's problems and books of professional interest to 
teachers, provided these books are not in demand on the campus. 
Rules regarding the use of the library and its books are made solely 
to benefit the greatest number of borrowers and are kept at a min- 
imum. A list of library rules is included in the student's handbook. 
When college is in session, the library is open on week days from 
8:00 A. M. to 10:00 P. M., and on Sundays (for recreational read- 
ing) from 3 :00 P. M. to 5 :00 P. M. During vacations the library 
is open week days from 9 :00 A. M. to 12 :00 P. M. and from 2 :00 
P. M. to 5 :00 P. M. except on Saturdays, when 12 :00 P. M. is the 
closing hour. The Library is closed on JNTew Year's Day, Commence- 
ment Day, the Fourth of July, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas 
Day. 



STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The student health service has as its aim the maintenance of good 
health among all members of the college community. To further 
this objective the work is necessarily of two types : first, preventive 
measures, and second, the care of sick students. 

Preventive measures comprise : first, a complete medical exami- 
nation of each student in both her Freshman and Senior years. This 
examination will include a careful physical examination, laboratory 
tests, and a chest X-ray of every entering student. The health 
service occasionally must recommend to the administration that a 
student physically unable to carry the full college load be asked to 
lighten her work or to withdraw from college until such time as her 
health shall improve. Second, follow-up examinations of all students 
showing remediable defects, with an especial effort to see that all 
such defects are corrected as soon as possible ; third, careful checking 
of all students engaged in self-help activities, extra academic work, 
athletic contests, or other strenuous extra-curricular duties; fourth, 
vaccination for smallpox of each member of the college community 
every five years in accordance with the ordinance of the city of 
Greensboro, and typhoid vaccination of all food handlers yearly; 
fifth, ■ health supervision of the physical conditions under which 
students work and live. Proper diet, heating, lighting, ventilation, 
and sanitation are all included among these conditions. 

The care of sick students, which is the second major duty of the 
health service, is centered in the Anna M. Gove Infirmary. Here, 
with a staff of two full-time and one half-time physicians and two 
graduate nurses always in attendance, all medical and minor sur- 



Community Life 37 

gical cases are given complete care. Major surgical cases must be 
referred to a hospital and surgeon not directly connected with the 
College. 

All resident students too ill to attend their college duties are ad- 
mitted to the Infirmary for care, and excuses are issued upon their 
recovery and readmission to classes. Town students ill at home 
must bring to the college physician a note either from their parents 
or attending physician within seventy-two hours of their return to 
school. Excuses are then issued by the medical staff in accordance 
with the rules laid down by the faculty council. Students should 
report promptly to the Infirmary in case of illness of any kind. 
Prompt attention to minor conditions prevents the development of 
major ill health. In order to care for all cases promptly the student 
health service holds office hours as follows : 

Doctoks : 

8 :30 A. M. to 12 :30 P. M. daily except Sunday. 

1 :30 P. M. to 2 :30 P. M. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

Afternoons by appointment. Emergency at any time. 

Nurses : 

7:45 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. daily except Sunday. 
1 :30 P. M. to 2 :30 P. M. daily except Sunday. 
6 :45 P. M. to 7 :30 P. M. daily except Sunday. 
8 :00 A. M. to 9 :00 A. M. Sundays. 



COMMUNITY LIFE 

GOVERNMENT 

The government of the College is based upon the principles to be 
found in any well organized community. The Faculty and the stu- 
dents have integrated their ideas in the formation of the Constitu- 
tion. The law-making authority resides in a representative body from 
the student group and the Faculty. All student officers are chosen 
democratically. The student organization works in close cooperation 
with the Dean of Women and the Counselors who have charge of the 
residence halls. 

It is understood that to the Faculty and the Executive Officers is 
reserved the handling of such matters as affect academic questions, 
matters relating to the health of the college community, the control of 
property, and of special cases of discipline which are outside of stu- 
dent jurisdiction. 



38 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

SOCIAL LIFE 

The social life of the College centers around the residence hall 
units, the four societies, and various clubs and class organiza- 
tions. Picnics, week-end camping trips, teas, formal and in- 
formal dances help create a normal social atmosphere. Through 
certain of the clubs and through the advisory system, members of 
the Faculty are able to establish social contacts with the students, 
and often entertain them in their homes. Altogether there are many 
opportunities within the college community for a wholesome social 
life. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Though the College is non-sectarian in its management, the students 
are surrounded by religious influences. In addition to the Young 
Women's Christian Association, there are organized church groups 
with which students may associate themselves for congenial Chris- 
tian fellowship and for training in church and religious leadership. 
Four churches — Methodist, Episcopal, Baptist, and Presbyterian — 
maintain student secretaries who live near the College and work 
through student centers or churches adjoining the campus. A Gen- 
eral Council on Eeligious Activities made up of the student presi- 
dents of the Young Women's Christian Association and the church 
groups, the four church secretaries and Faculty advisers for the 
other groups functions as a unifying center for all religious ac- 
tivities. Students are encouraged both by the College and the 
churches to attend regularly the church of their choice. Pastors of 
Greensboro churches are frequently heard at chapel convocations, 
and four Sunday evenings each year are set aside for University 
Sermons to the College community by outstanding spiritual leaders. 

CHAPEL EXERCISES 

Chapel exercises are held in Aycock auditorium on Tuesdays and 
on occasional Fridays. Attendance is required at Tuesday convo- 
cations, and the exercises are most often of a devotional nature with 
the vested choir, composed of one hundred and twenty-five students, 
singing. Friday convocations are more informal in nature and are 
generally given over to special music programs or moving pictures 
that are interesting as well as educational. 

ARTIST AND LECTURE COURSE 

The College every year brings to its student body a number of 
distinguished artists in the fields of music, art, the dance, and 
letters. Appearing during the 1936-37 season were the following: 



Organizations and Clubs 39 

Emanuel Feuermann, Elisabeth Rethberg and Ezio Pinza, Jascha 
Heifetz, the National Symphony Orchestra, Josef Hoffman, the 
Jooss Ballet, Blanche Yurka, Christopher Morley, Hugh Walpole, 
Herbert Agar, Gordon B. Enders, John Mason Brown, Howard W. 
Haggard, the Countess of Listowell, George Lyman Kittredge, Dr. 
Robert A. Millikan, and Edward Weeks. 

The entertainment fee paid at the time of registration gives ad- 
mission to the entire series of recitals and lectures. 

DRAMATICS 

The College offers exceptional advantages to students interested in 
dramatic activities. Numerous experimental plays, departmental 
plays, one-act plays, as well as pretentious full-length plays presented 
by the Play-Likers, give a considerable number of students oppor- 
tunities not only to act, but also to do creative work in the arts of the 
theatre. The facilities for carrying on such work in the College are 
hardly surpassed by any college in the country. 



ORGANIZATIONS AND CLUBS 

ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 

The Alumnae and Former Students Association of the Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina was organized in 1893 
and incorporated by act of the General Assembly of North Carolina 
on March 8, 1909. The objects of the Association, as set forth in 
section 3 of the Act incorporating it, are : 

"To encourage, foster, and promote education in the State of 
North Carolina; to aid and assist the Woman's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, by donations or otherwise; to aid and 
assist, by loans or donations, or both, worthy young women of the 
State to obtain an education at the said College, and for such pur- 
pose to receive, hold, invest, manage, and disburse any fund or funds 
which may come into its possession." 

For a number of years the Association was engaged in raising 
funds with which to erect an Alumnae House on the campus. During 
the past two years the House has been constructed and furnished 
at a cost of approximately $150,000.00. It was opened in Janu- 
ary, 1937, and made available for use for official alumnae and col- 
lege functions. 

Officers for the past year were: President, Dr. Mary Poteat, 
Durham; Vice President, Mrs. C. A. Street, Winston-Salem; Gen- 
eral Secretary, Clara B. Byrd, Woman's College, Greensboro. 



40 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Young Women's Christian Association, affiliated with the 
national organization and with the World's Christian Student Fed- 
erations, seeks not only to aid students with their intimate daily 
problems of living, but also to form a channel through which they 
may unite themselves with the great body of students throughout the 
world who seek the best way of life for themselves and for all peo- 
ple of all races. Any student of the College may become a member 
of the Association by accepting as her own the three-fold purpose: 
(1) To find abundant life through a growing knowledge of God; (2) 
To help make such life possible for all people; and (3) To seek to 
understand and to follow Jesus. In conjunction with the Church 
groups the Association sponsors seminars, discussion groups, services 
of worship and religious education, chapel programs, recreational 
activities, intercollegiate conferences, campus and community service 
work, and other group and individual activity of religious nature 
and significance. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

There is established at the College a section of Alpha of North 
Carolina of Phi Beta Kappa. Most elections to this section of the 
national honorary scholastic society are from the senior class, but 
there are occasional elections from the junior class and from the 
alumnae. 

THE SOCIETIES 

The Adelphian, Cornelian, Dikean, and Aletheian societies oc- 
cupy an important place in student life. Social organizations man- 
aged entirely by students, the societies, give opportunity for friend- 
ship and social improvement. Membership is optional, but few, if any, 
representative students fail to identify themselves with one of the 
societies. Each society owns a comfortable assembly hall in Stu- 
dents' building and keeps open house several times during the year. 
Informal teas, dances, and parties are features of many regular 
programs, and each society has a formal dance during the spring 
semester. The regular fortnightly meetings are secret. The Board 
of Trustees prohibits any other secret organizations. 

CLUBS 

Students who are interested in some particular sport, pastime, or 
academic pursuit will find among the college clubs an organization 
that will give encouragement and counsel. Some groups are made 
up of both students and members of the Faculty, but most often 
they are entirely controlled by the students themselves. Among the 



Publications 41 

clubs which promote interest in sports, music, dramatics, debating, 
or departmental subjects are the following: Archery Club, Botany- 
Club, Cercle Frangais, Chemistry Club, Circulo Espanol, Der Deut- 
sche Verein, Dolphin Club, Education Club, Home Economics Club, 
International Relations Club, Madrigal Club, The Masqueraders, 
Mathematics Club, Orchestra, Orchesis Club, Physics Club, Play- 
Likers, Quill Club, Science Club, Speakers' Club, Young Voters' 
Club and Zoology Field Club. 



PUBLICATIONS 

The Bulletin: Issued quarterly by the College; contains matter of 
general and specific interest to the citizens of the State, the Faculty, 
prospective students, and the College as a whole. 

Alumnae News: Published quarterly. The official organ of the 
Alumnae and Former Students Association. Each issue contains col- 
lege notes, communications from graduates and former students, and 
news matter of interest to friends of the College. 

The Carolinian: The College newspaper, issued Friday of each 
week. 

The Coraddi: The literary magazine of the College, issued quar- 
terly. 

Pine Needles: The College annual, produced under the auspices of 
the Student Government Association. 

The Extension Division issues during the year many useful pam- 
phlets and bulletins. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

I. PLACEMENT BUREAU 

It is the purpose of the Woman's College to assist all of its gradu- 
ates and former students in securing work in their chosen fields. 
Teachers, technicians, secretaries, social workers, and others will be 
given every possible aid toward a realization of their ambitions in 
the professional and business world. This service does not end when 
the graduate is placed for the first time, but is continuous for all 
former students. There is no cost for the service. Former students 
desiring such assistance, however, must keep the Placement Bureau 
informed of their plans and activities. 

II. EXTENSION DIVISION 

The Extension Division of the University of North Carolina de- 
sires to render aid to teachers in service by arranging for technical 
courses for credit toward a degree or certificate, and to offer to 
them and to other citizens of the State cultural courses. The State 
does not provide this service except as it may be self-supporting; 
but afternoon or evening courses can be arranged at a minimum cost 
to the individual. Lecture series by members of the Faculty can also 
be arranged. The counties adjacent to Greensboro are the special 
field of the "Woman's College. 

III. SELF-HELP 

Although it is not possible for a student to earn all of her expenses 
at the Woman's College or for all who apply to earn even a part, the 
College is concerned with giving every opportunity to those who de- 
sire help. A number of students are employed by the College in 
laboratories, offices, the Library, and the dining rooms. Still others 
are now being aided under the National Youth Administration. As 
long as the Government furnishes such aid, this institution will con- 
tinue to avail itself of it in order that as many young women as pos- 
sible may have the advantages of college training. 

IV. PUBLICATIONS OFFICE 

The College Publications Office, where catalogues and bulletins 
are edited and newspaper stories prepared for the press of the state, 
is also under the supervision of the Director of Public Relations. 

Those desiring further information regarding any of the services 
listed above should communicate with Mr. C. W. Phillips, Director of 
Public Relations. 



EXPENSES 

REGULAR COURSE 

According to the charter of the institution, board must be fur- 
nished in its dormitories at actual cost. The price of board in the 
schedule below is based on present prices. The College, therefore, 
reserves the right to increase the price of board to cover any material 
increase in food prices. Since there is no possible profit in board, no 
risk of loss can be taken. It is necessary that all bills be paid in 
advance; no exceptions can be made. 

For Students Living in Dormitories : 

Tuition - $ 50.00* 

Registration fee 15.00 

Medical fee 7.00 

Board (9 months) 145.00 

Room rent (9 months) 35.00 

Fuel and lights 30.00 

Laundry 25.00 

Other fees and charges 20.00 

$327.00 

Entertainment feef 5.00 

Student Activities fee** 8.00 

Total $340.00 

For Students Not Living in Dormitories : 

Tuition $ 50.00* 

Registration fee 15.00 

Medical fee 7.00 

Fuel and lights 16.00 

Other fees and charges 20.00 

$108.00 

Entertainment feet 5.00 

Student Activities fee** 8.00 

Total $121.00 

In addition to the amounts listed above students must purchase a 
gymnasium outfit costing approximately $8.00. (Commercial stu- 
dents are charged $7.00 for gymnasium suit.) A laboratory fee of 



*A tuition charge of $100.00 is made of a non-resident of the State. 

t This fee admits students to the Civic Music concerts and the lecture program of the 
College, and certain other College-wide activities. 

**This fee was voted by the student body and approved by the administration. It 
pays membership or participation in the Student Government, the Y.W.C.A., the four 
literary societies, the Carolinian, the Coraddi, Pine Needles, the Athletic Association, and 
other College-wide activities. For an additional payment of $2.00, the student may obtain 
a copy of the annual (Pine Needles). 



44 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

$1.00 will also be charged for chest X-ray record which is required of 
every new student. 

The payments for the regular charges and fees will be due as fol- 
lows, in advance: 

For students who board in dormitories : 

Room reservation fee $ 10.00 

On entrance 100.00 

November 15 95.00 

January 15 70.00 

March 15 , 65.00 

$340.00 
For students who do not board in dormitories : 

On entrance $ 70.00 

January 15 . 51.00 

$121.00 

In addition to the above, for students taking private instruction in all 
departments of Applied Music, Instrumental or Special Yocal 
Music : 

On entrance — $ 15.00 

November 15 15.00 

January 15 15.00 

March 15 - 15.00 

$ 60.00 
Fee for the use of practice piano : 

Juniors and Seniors in B.S. in Music course, $18.00 for the year. 
Freshmen and Sophomores in B.S. in Music Course, $14.00 for 

the year. 
Other Music students, $9.00 for the year. 

Fee for organ practice : 

One hour per week on the three manual organ, $9.00 for the year. 
One hour per week on the two manual organ, $5.00 for the year. 
One hour per week on the two manual and pedal reed organ, $1.75 

for the year. 
One hour per week on the pedal piano, $1.75 for the year. 

Fee for violin and other orchestral instruments, practice room : 

Freshmen and Sophomores in B.S. in Music, $7.00 for the year. 
Juniors and Seniors in B.S. in Music, $9.00 for the year. 
Other Violin students, $4.50 for the year. 

A special fee of $45.00 for the year is charged for the two courses, 
Music 49 and 50. 



Expenses 45 

Payments for new students entering the second semester : 
For students who board in the dormitories : 

On entrance $ 95.00 

March 15 ~ 85.00 

$180.00 
For students who do not board in the dormitories : 

On entrance $ 40.00 

March 15 27.50 



$67.50 
LABORATORY FEES 

To defray in part the cost of materials actually consumed by the 
student in her laboratory work, certain fees, ranging in amount from 
$1.00 to $8.00, according to the course taken, will be charged. These 
fees must be paid on the day of registration, and no student may be 
enrolled in a course until the required fee is paid. These fees are 
listed in the course descriptions appearing elsewhere in the catalogue. 
(See Art, Biology, Chemistry, Commercial Department, Home Eco- 
nomics, Physics, Play Production, Psychology, and Education.) 

OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES 

Additional expenses at the college will be the cost of text-books, 
gymnasium outfit, diagnostic X-ray films, and for graduates, a 
fee of $7.50. 

SPECIAL. BUSINESS COURSES 

To any student not boarding in the dormitories, the charges for a 
special course in Stenography will be $50.00 for tuition, and the regu- 
lar fees, $71.00, and a laboratory fee of $2.00 for each semester. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who register for some form of Applied Music only (Piano, 
Organ, Voice, Violin) pay $75.00. This is payable $45.00 on en- 
trance, $30.00 at the beginning of the spring semester. 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The students are required to purchase their text-books. For their 
convenience the College will maintain a depository where all neces- 
sary books may be had at list prices. Students are advised to bring 
a good English dictionary and other useful reference books in their 
possession. English, Latin, French, and German lexicons, when 
needed, must be purchased by the student. 



46 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

In all business matters, the College prefers to deal directly with the 
students rather than with their parents or guardians. This gives the 
students business experience and makes them realize the cost of their 
training. 

All students are supposed to matriculate for the full year, and must 
not expect any fees or dues remitted on account of their irregularities 
or change in plans, except in case of serious illness, making it neces- 
sary for the resident physician to advise them to return home. 

All checks and money orders should be made payable to E. J. 
Forney, Treasurer. 



LOAN FUNDS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Students' Loan Fund was established in 1892-1893. It is 
made up of funds given by a number of individuals. Among these 
are the following: Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, who gave the 
Adelaide Worth Daniels Fund; Mrs. J. C. Buxton; General and 
Mrs. Julian S. Carr; Charles Broadway Rouss; and Mr. and Mrs. 
V. Everit Macy. This fund now amounts to $5,779.20. 

The Alumnae Loan and Scholarship Fund. For the purpose of 
making loans to worthy students, chiefly in the higher classes, who 
could not return to college without aid, the Alumnae Association has 
raised a fund. This fund amounts to $24,607.76. 

The McIver Loan Fund. As a memorial to the founder and first 
president of the College, the Alumnae Association raised the McIver 
Loan Fund, now amounting to $9,977.49. 

The Bryant Loan Fund. The Bryant Loan Fund of $7,500 be- 
queathed to the College by the late Victor S. Bryant, of Durham, 
North Carolina, is in constant use. Notes made from this loan fund 
bear 6% interest from the date of the loan. 

Mollie K. Fetzer Loan Fund. This loan fund was established 
by T. J. Fetzer as a memorial to his sister. It is now $437.70. 

Elizabeth Crow Mahler Loan Fund. This fund was established 
by Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first Lady Principal of the College, 
in memory of her niece. This fund is now $170.93. 

The Ida Haughton Cowan Loan Fund. Miss Ida H. Cowan, 
Class of 1902, gave a loan fund in memory of her mother. It is now 
$126.13. 



Loan Funds, Fellowships, and Scholarships 47 

Doris Wright Memorial Fund. This fund of $1,000 was con- 
tributed by friends of the late C. C. Wright, Superintendent of Edu- 
cation in Wilkes County. This is used for aiding students from 
Wilkes County. It is now $1,525.15. 

The Musgrove Memorial Fund. Mrs. Jeannette Musgrove 
Bounds, Class of 1914, established a loan fund of $100 in memory of 
her father. It is now $143.09. 

Mary Foust and Caroline McNeill Loan Fund has been estab- 
lished by Dr. J. I. Foust, President Emeritus, and Mrs. J. I. Foust, 
jointly, in memory of Mary Foust Armstrong and Caroline McNeill. 
The fund is now $1,600.25. 

Rebecca Christine Phoenix Memorial Loan Fund. This was 
established in 1932 by Mr. John J. Phoenix and family in memory 
of his daughter. It is now $244.41. 

The Lilt Connally Morehead Loan Fund. Mrs. Lily C. Meb- 
ane, of Spray, North Carolina, has given $4,170 as a nucleus of a 
loan fund in memory of her mother. The fund is now $ 4,356.45. 

The Daphne Carraway Memorial Loan Fund. Miss Irma 
Carraway, Class of 1897, established this loan fund in memory of 
her sister, Daphne Carraway, Class of 1902. In awarding these 
loans, graduates of the Barium Springs Orphanage have the pref- 
erence. The amount of this fund is $504.39. 

The Royal Arch and Knights Templar Loan Fund was estab- 
lished in the fall of 1921. It is now $2,329.49. 

The Masonic Loan Fund was established in 1922. It is now 

$5,496.86. 

The Masonic Theatre Educational Loan Fund of New Bern. 
The Scottish Rite Masons of Eastern North Carolina have con- 
tributed a loan fund of $200. It is now $221.33. 

The Class of 1925 has established a loan of $100. It is now 
$133.59. 

Class of 1929 Loan Fund. The Class of 1929 established a loan 
fund of $350. 

The Class of 1932 gave a fund of $150 to be used as a loan until 
the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1933 has given $75 as a loan fund. 



48 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

The Class of 1935 has given a fund to be used as a loan for three 
years. It is now $309.20. 

The Class of 1936 has established a loan fund of $275.02. This 
will be used for loans until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then 
go to the Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1938 has established a loan fund. It amounts to 
$23.49. 

The Commercial Class of 1935 established a fund to be used as 
a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. The fund amounts to $19.96. 

Student Government Fund of 1935. This fund was established 
as a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. It amounts to $200. 

The North Carolina Association of Jewish Women established 
a loan fund for emergency aid to students in case of serious illness. 
It is now $248.00. 

Miss Jessie McLean has given $50 to be used as a Loan for Stu- 
dents Needing Special Medical Attention. It is now $63.77. 



Students of the Sallie Southall Cotten Hall have estab- 
lished a loan fund, now amounting to $44.72. 

The Laura H. Coit Loan Fund is being given by the students of 
the College. It is now $3,133.05. 

The Carrie MacEae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund. Mrs. C. W. 
Tillett of Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1933 to 1935 donated 
$100 yearly to the College for a gift scholarship. In September, 
1935, she founded the Carrie MacEae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund 
with an initial gift of $100, with the expectation of adding to the 
fund in the future. This fund is available for Juniors and Seniors, 
preferably Seniors. It is a memorial to Mrs. Tillett's small daugh- 
ter, Carrie MacEae Tillett. 

The Katherine Martin Loan Fund. The Faculty wives 
through their organization have given to the College the Katherine 
Martin Loan Fund of $58 for use in emergencies. This fund is a 
memorial to Mrs. Katherine Martin, wife of W. W. Martin, Pro- 
fessor of Psychology at the College. 

The Hennie Bynum Fund. The late Judge John Gray Bynum 
bequeathed to the College $1,000, the income from which is used to 
aid young women from the Presbyterian Church of Morganton, 
North Carolina. 



Loan Funds, Fellowships, and Scholarships 49 

The Mina Weil Endowment Fund. Mrs. Janet Weil Bluethen- 
thal has established an endowment of $6,000 in honor of her mother. 
The income from this fund is granted for scholarships. 

The Mendenhall Endowment. Miss Gertrude Whittier Men- 
denhall, one of the charter members of the Faculty and Head of the 
Mathematics Department for many years, left to the College an en- 
dowment of $2,091.41. The income is awarded each year as a 
scholarship to the student who does the best work in mathematics. 

The United Daughtees of the Confedeeacy Scholarships. The 
North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy 
offers 8 scholarships to descendants of Confederate veterans. These 
scholarships are worth $130 to $150 each. They also offer the Jeffer- 
son Davis Scholarship of $200 as an Essay Prize. 

The Children of the Confederacy offer two scholarships of $130 
each. 

Music Contest Scholarships. The Department of Music at the 
College has established a fund from which Music Contest Scholar- 
ships are awarded. The fund is now $123.52. 

Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. Mrs. Henry Weil of Goldsboro, 
North Carolina, has established at the College in memory of her late 
husband a fund of $16,000, known as the Henry Weil Fellowship 
Fund. 

(1) The Henry Weil Fellowship shall be awarded each year to a 
member of the graduating class, but if there is no member of the 
class who meets the conditions of award, the committee shall have the 
right to award the fellowship to a member of any class graduating 
within the preceding five years. 

(2) A committee shall be appointed by the Dean of Administra- 
tion to assist in making the award. 

The Liberty Hall Chapter, D.A.R., Membership Memorial 
Loan Fund. By reason of the active interest of Miss Daisy Cuth- 
bertson, an alumna of the college from Charlotte, North Carolina, 
this loan fund was established in June, 1935. It is available to 
Juniors and Seniors. The fund amounts to $1,000. 

The Camilla Croom Rodman Scholarships. Col. W. B. Rod- 
man of Norfolk, Virginia, has established two scholarships in mem- 
ory of his wife. The donor reserves the right to select the bene- 
ficiaries of these scholarships, one of which is to be awarded to a stu- 
dent from Hyde County and the other to a student from the State at 
large. 



50 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

ADMISSION 

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Applicants for Admission to the College should be sixteen years old 
and in good health. 

Every applicant must be vaccinated against smallpox the year of 
her entrance. She is advised to do this two weeks before leaving 
home and to send her certificate of vaccination to the college 
physician or bring it to the Infirmary when she enters college. 

Students are admitted by certificate or by examination. Those ad- 
mitted by certificate must be graduates of standard high schools and 
must be recommended by the school; those admitted by examination 
must have completed the equivalent of a four-year high school course 
and must pass the uniform College Entrance Examination arranged 
by the North Carolina College Conference. 

It must be generally understood that admission to the College does 
not carry admission to candidacy for a degree. In order to be ad- 
mitted as a candidate for a degree, the applicant must meet the spe- 
cific requirements laid down for that degree: Provided the ap- 
plicant offers 15 acceptable units, deficiencies may be allowed in 
Foreign Language, Mathematics, or History. Such deficiencies 
must be removed before the student may register as a sophomore. 

High school records must be submitted on blanks supplied by the 
College. The Secretary of the College will be glad to furnish these 
upon application. 

Early registration is very desirable. High school records are more 
easily secured before the school closes. Rooms in the residence halls 
are assigned in order of application, and late applicants can not be 
accepted after all rooms are assigned. Last year the number of 
applications far exceeded the number of rooms available in the resi- 
dence halls. 

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ENTRANCE 

The subjects in which credit for admission to the College may be offered 
and the maximum amount of credit accepted in each subject are given in 
the following table: 

UNITS 

English 4 

History and other Social Sciences 4 

Mathematics 4 

Greek 3 

*Latin 4 

*French 3 

♦German 3 

♦Spanish 2 



♦Credit will not be given for less than two years of a foreign language. 



Pbescbibed Requirements 51 

Biology 1 

Botany 1 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Physiology V 2 

Zoology 1 

General Science 1 

Physiography 1 

Drawing 1 

Civics 1 

Bible 2 

Music 2 

Expression % 

VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS 

Not more than three elective units will be accepted from this list of 
vocational subjects: 

UNITS 

Commercial Geography y 2 

Bookkeeping ~ 1 

Commercial Arithmetic . — 1 

Stenography 1 

Manual Arts 2 

Home Economics _ 2 



PRESCRIBED REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission to candidacy for the different degrees 
are as follows: 

BACHELOR OP ARTS 

UNITS 

English (four years) 4 

Algebra (one and one-half years) Vh 

Plane Geometry (one year) 1 

Foreign Language (two years in one language) 2 

History (two years) 2 

Electives (1) 4% 

15 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Home Economics, Physical Education, Secretarial Administration 

UNITS 

English (four years) 4 

Algebra (one and one-half years) IY2 

Plane Geometry (one year) 1 

Foreign Language (two years in one language) 2 

History (two years) 2 

♦Science 1 

Electives (1) 3% 

15 



♦Not required for Secretarial Administration. 



52 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Bachelor of Science in Mnsic 

UNITS 

English (four years) 4 

Algebra (one and one-half years) iy 2 

Plane Geometry (one year) 1 

♦Foreign Language (three years in one language) 3 

History (two years) 2 

Music (2 ) 2 

Electives (1) 1% 

15 

(1). Electives: The elective units in each case must be chosen from the 
list of "Subjects Accepted for Entrance." It is strongly urged and 
recommended that elective units be made up from the fields of math- 
ematics (second-year algebra for a full year, solid geometry for a 
half year, and plane trigonometry for a half year), social science 
(ancient history, mediaeval and modern history, modern history, 
English history, American history, American history and civics as a 
combination, civics, sociology, and economics), foreign language 
(Spanish, German, French, Latin, and Greek, with not fewer than 
two units in any one), and science with full laboratory (chemistry, 
physics, biology, botany, zoology, geology, physiography, and gener- 
al science). One unit is allowed for a full year's work in any one of 
the named sciences, provided lectures or recitations and laboratory 
work are involved; if no laboratory work is included, any one of the 
named sciences, taken for a full year, carries only a half unit credit. 
A credit of less than a half unit will not be allowed in any subject. 

(2). MUSIC: 1 or 2 units. One unit of music may be offered as an elective 
for entrance to any college course. To satisfy the requirements of one 
unit credit in any course except that of B.S. in Music, a student must offer 
one of the following: 

a. Rudiments of Music, and Harmony: Not less than thirty-two weeks' 
work, of five forty-minute recitations each week. 

Suggested Texts: Music Notation and Terminology — K. W. Gehrkens, 
(A. S. Barnes and Co.) and Harmony for the Ear, Eye, and Keyboard, Ar- 
thur Heacox (O. Ditson Co.). 

b. Harmony and History of Music: Not less than thirty- two weeks' 
work, of five forty-minute recitations each week. It is suggested that 
three recitations each week can be devoted to the study of notation and 
harmony, as suggested for Course I, and the remaining two days be used 
in a careful study of history of music, including, if possible, some ex- 
perience in intelligent listening to representative composition of the period 
of composer under consideration. A well-kept notebook for the work in 
music history is strongly urged. 

Suggested Texts: For harmony — the same as for Course I. History — 
History of Muste — Cecil Forsyth (Art Publication Society). 

c. Elementary Theory: Together with a usable knowledge of piano or 
Tiolin. This elementary theory must include, as a minimum, a knowledge 



* Three years in one language or two each in two languages. 



Admission to Advanced Standing 53 

of the rudiments of music; scales (major and minor), intervals and staff 
notation, and musical terms and expression marks in common use. In the 
practical music presented for this unit of credit, the student must offer 
one of the following: 

Piano: The ability to play effectively the Sonatinas of Clementi and 
Kuhlau, or compositions of like grade, and the ability to play well stan- 
dard church hymns. 

Violin: The ability to play well scales and compositions covering the 
first three positions. 

See School of Music, page 52, for admission requirements to B.S. 
in Music Courses. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students entering with advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman Class. 

Applicants for admission from other colleges should send to the 
Kegistrar: (1) an official statement of entrance and college records; 
(2) a catalogue of the institution from which they transfer, marked 
to indicate the courses taken; and (3) a statement of honorable dis- 
missal. It is desirable that the official transcript of the applicant's 
entrance and college record of work to the end of the first semester 
of the year prior to her transfer be sent to the Registrar before 
May 1. This certificate should include a statement of the subjects 
being pursued during the second semester, together with the number 
of hours of credit to be secured in each. The letter of honorable dis- 
missal and the final record of the second semester should be sent to 
the Registrar before July 1. 

In estimating the credit to be allowed, the standing of the college 
previously attended and the quality as well as the quantity of the 
student's work will receive consideration. Should the student's work 
during her first year at this college prove unsatisfactory, the amount 
of credit allowed may be reduced. 

Students who transfer from junior colleges or from four- 
year colleges not affiliated with the Southern Association, or a similar 
regional association, must present laboratory notebooks in all science 
courses that are offered for advanced credit. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR DEGREE 

The College offers five courses of study leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. Unless given special per- 
mission to register for an irregular course, every student must take 
one of the courses leading to a degree. 

DEGREE OP BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The minimum requirement*! for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is 
the satisfactory completion of 120 semester hours which include the 
following : 

Englishi 12 semester hours 

Social Studies (Economics, Government, 

History, Sociology) 12 semester hour3 

Natural Sciences2 and Mathematics3 ....12 semester hours 
Foreign Language . . . 

a reading knowledge* of one or 12 semester hourss 

Hygiene _ 4 semester hours 

Major subjectss 24 to 42 semester hours 

Physical Education (not credited 
on the 120 semester hours) 4 semesters 

x Of the 12 semester hours required in English, 6 shall be in com- 
position and 6 shall be in literature. Freshmen whose level of pro- 
ficiency in English Composition is below the required standard shall 
be enrolled in a course without credit until the required standard is 
attained. Any undergraduate whose work in any course gives evi- 
dence of lack of proficiency in written English shall be brought to the 
attention of a committee from the English Department. The com- 
mittee after investigating the student's work will arrange for the 
removal of the deficiency and will determine when the deficiency has 
been removed. Proficiency in written English is a requirement for 
graduation. 

2 Students preparing to be laboratory technicians and pre-medical 
students are advised to take two sciences each year in both the fresh- 
man and sophomore years. 

Students preparing to take the interdepartmental major in gram- 
mar grade or in primary teaching are advised to elect Psychology 
21-22, History 11 or 12, and if possible Biology 35 in the sophomore 
year. 

3 Only 6 of the required 12 semester hours may be in Mathematics ; 
6 semester hours of a laboratory science are required. Psychology 11 
and 12 may be taken to meet the requirement only by students who 
are not preparing to teach. Students who plan to major in Math- 
ematics and who wish to secure a certificate to teach General Science 
also are advised to choose both Mathematics and a science in the 
freshman year. 

* For the removal of requirements by proficiency examinations see page 66. 
fin addition to the minimum of 120 semester hours, every candidate for a degree must 
present 204 Quality Points. For an examination of this requirement see page 70. 



Requirements for the Bachelor Degree 55 

4 To prove a reading knowledge of a language, the student must 
take an examination, the results of which will be judged by accuracy 
in understanding the passages read. For such an examination col- 
lege instruction in the language is not essential, but in general three 
years of study of the language in a secondary school, or the equiv- 
alent, supplemented by intensive reading during the summer preced- 
ing the examination will be necessary. 

5 After a student has fulfilled the language requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, she may take for credit one year of a for- 
eign language. 

6 For departmental majors the requirement is not less than 24 
semester hours and not more than 36 above Grade I. For interde- 
partmental majors which include work in two departments the mini- 
mum total in all major subjects is 36 semester hours above Grade I ; 
for interdepartmental majors which include work in three depart- 
ments the minimum total is 42 semester hours. 

The specified requirements for graduation except those in the 
major subject ordinarily must be taken in the freshman and soph- 
omore years. Bachelor of Arts students with a major in Music will 
find it necessary to postpone some of the minimum requirements. In 
other exceptional cases a required subject may, with the consent of 
the adviser and the class chairman, be taken later than the freshman 
and sophomore years. 

Freshmen may take 4 semester hours of Applied Music of college 
grade. Thereafter, all courses in Applied Music shall be paralleled 
by an equal number of hours in the Theory of Music. 

All courses are classified in four grades. Those courses primarily 
for Freshmen and Sophomores are designated as Grade I; those 
primarily for Sophomores and Juniors as Grade II ; those primarily 
for Juniors and Seniors as Grade III; and those for graduate stu- 
dents as Grade IV. Freshmen and Sophomores are admitted to 
courses of Grade III and Freshmen to those of Grade II only by 
special permission. In order that no hardships be worked, however, 
discretionary powers for making necessary adjustments in grading of 
courses are left to the class chairman and the student's adviser. For 
a student beginning a language in college a second course in that 
language would be Grade II. 

FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

In her junior and senior years each candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts must complete a considerable amount of work in a 
field of concentration. The selection of the field for intensive study 



56 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

shall be made by the student after consultation with her class chair- 
man not later than the second semester of her sophomore year. 
Freshmen and Sophomores who know in what field they desire to 
major should, through their class chairman, get in touch with the 
special adviser in their field as early as possible. The responsibility 
for courses in the field of concentration up to the minimum number 
of hours required for concentration shall rest with the head of the 
department concerned in the departmental major and with the faculty 
group in the interdepartmental major. For work beyond this mini- 
mum requirement the class chairman is responsible. 

Students desiring to teach are advised to fulfill the requirements of 
the State Department of Public Instruction for the certificate in the 
state in which they expect to teach. For students preparing to teach 
in high school, 15 semester hours of Education may be credited on the 
Bachelor of Arts degree; for those preparing to teach in the gra mm ar 
grades, 19 semester hours; for those preparing to teach in the pri- 
mary grades, 18 semester hours. 

Courses fulfilling the requirements for graduation in the fields of 
concentration shall be above Grade I. At least 36 of the student's 
last 60 hours shall be of Grade III, and not more than 12 of the last 
60 may be of Grade I. When, however, this regulation shall work a 
special hardship upon a student, adjustments will be made by the 
class chairman and the student's adviser. 

The curriculum provides two types of majors in the field of concen- 
tration as follows : 

I. Departmental Major 

The departmental major lies within one department. The follow- 
ing departments offer an opportunity for major work : Art, Biology, 
Chemistry, English, Economics, History and Political Science, 
French, German, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Psychology, 
Sociology, Spanish. 

A student must take not less than 24 nor more than 36 semester 
hours above Grade I in the major subject. With the approval of 
the major department adviser and her class chairman, however, she 
may choose part of the major work from closely related departments. 

II. Interdepartmental Majors 

Interdepartmental majors include work in two or three depart- 
ments so arranged that the student's efforts may be directed toward 
a more comprehensive understanding of a field of knowledge. When 
the interdepartmental major includes work in two departments, not 
less than 15 semester hours nor more than 21 shall be offered in one 
subject, the minimum total to be 36 semester hours above Grade I. 



Comprehensive Examinations 57 

When the major includes work in three departments, not less than 9 
semester hours in a subject shall count on the major, the minimum 
total to be 42 semester hours. 

The following interdepartmental majors are now offered: labor- 
atory technician, pre-medical, primary or grammar grade teaching 
Others are to be arranged. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

Beginning with the class of 1940 a comprehensive examination in 
the field of concentration shall be required of all candidates for 
graduation. The aim of such an examination is to provide a measure 
of the student's success in achieving a general mastery of the field as 
a whole. Since the examination is not considered as an end in it- 
self, however, special emphasis shall be placed upon the preparation 
for it, such preparation to include among other things a coordinating 
course in the field of concentration which shall serve to stimulate a 
better correlation of course material and a better view of the field as 
a whole. The comprehensive examination which will be given dur- 
ing the student's senior year will not take the place of all course ex- 
aminations at the end of that year, but may serve to exempt the 
student from one or more such examinations in her field of concen- 
tration at that time. The comprehensive examination shall count in 
part, but shall not be the determining factor in granting the degree. 

HONORS COURSES 

Plans are under way for the gradual adoption of honors courses for 
the exceptional student. Such courses will be pursued in the field 
of concentration during the senior year and will be under the direc- 
tion of the member of the Faculty in the field of concentration best 
suited to direct them. At the end of the year the student who has 
pursued the honors course must take an examination in the field of 
concentration. A student who pursues an honors course with distinc- 
tion and passes the examination with distinction will be graduated 
with honors in the field of concentration. 



COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 

OF SCIENCE 

1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

See School of Music, pages 143-151. 

2. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The following curricula, leading to the Bachelor of Science degree 
in home economics, are organized with homemaking training as a back- 
ground. Further, these curricula are organized to meet specialized sub- 
ject matter interests and to meet the requirements of official groups 
responsible for the accrediting of professional training courses. 

HOME ECONOMICS CURRICULA 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester sem. 

hks. 

English 1 3 

Foreign Language 3 

History 3 4 

Chemistry 1 or 3 3 

Home Economics 2 or Art 1 3 

Physical Education 

"16 



Second Semester sem. 

HKS. 

English 2 3 

Foreign Language 3 

History 4 4 

Chemistry 1 or 3 3 

Home Economics 2 or Art 1 3 

Physical Education „ 

~16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HES. 

English 11 „ 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Biology 1 3 

♦Chemistry 31 or Art 41 3 

Home Economics 11 or 23 3 

Physical Education ._. 

15 

A. GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS 



Second Semester 



SEM. 



English 12 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Biology 2 3 

♦Chemistry 32 or Art 3 3 

Home Economics 11 or 23 3 

Physical Education .« 

15 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Sociology 21 3 

Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Physics 3 or 3 

Home Economics 22 

Home Economics 21 3 

15 



Second Semester 



SEM. 



Physics 3 or 3 

Home Economics 22 

Home Economics 120 2 

Home Economics 31 3 

Home Economics 12 3 

Elective 4 

15 



* Students majoring in General Home Economics, Home Relationships and Child 
Development, Clothing and Textile Economics, Foods and Nutrition, Household Economics, 
Home Economics Education, and Institution Economics will take Chemistry 31 and 32 ; 
students majoring in Clothing and Textile Design, and The House and Its Furnishings 
will take Art 41 and 3. 



Requibements for, the Bachelor Degree 



59 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 33 or 136 2 

Electives 8 

~T5 



Second Semester 



Home Economics 33 or 136. 

Home Economics 133 

Electives 



SEM. 
HRS. 

2 

2 

11 



15 



B. CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 



First Semester 



1. Design 

2. Economics 

JUNIOR YEAR 

SEM. 
HRS. 



Second Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Physics 1 or 3 3 

Sociology 21 3 

Home Economics 12 3 



Art 24 or 

Economics of Consumption. 

Home Economics 120 

Home Economics 21 or 

Physics 2 

Home Economics 22 

Home Economics 112 

Electives 



15 



First Semester 



SENIOR YEAR 

SEM. 



Second Semester 



HRS. 

Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 122 or 

Elective 3 

Home Economics 24 3 

Home Economics 102 3 

Elective 1-4 

"15 



. 3 

. 2 

. 3 
. 3 
. 3 
._1 
15 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Home Economics 52 or 
Home Economics 154 ... 
Home Economics 33 ..... 
Electives 



. 3 

. 2 
.10 



15 



C. FOODS AND NUTRITION 



First Semester 



1. Nutrition or 

2. Food Economics 

JUNIOR YEAR 

SEM. 



Second Semester 



HRS. 

Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Physics 1 or 3 3 

Science Elective 3 

Home Economics 21 3 

T5 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Science Elective 

Home Economics 120 
Home Economics 31 . 
Home Economics 110 
Electives 



. 3 

. 2 
. 3 
. 2 
. 5 
"15 



60 



The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester sem. 

hrs. 

Sociology 21 3 

Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 33 or 136 2 

Home Economics 130 or 163 2-3 

Electives 2-3 

"15 



Second Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Home Economics 33 or 136 2 

Home Economics 128 or 20 3 

Home Economics 111 3 

Electives 7 



15 



D. HOUSING 



1. The House and Its Furnishings 

2. Household Economics 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Physics 1 or 3 3 

Sociology 21 3 

Home Economics 120 or 21 2-3 

Electives 0-1 

"15 



Second Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Elective or 

Economics of Consumption 3 

Art 24 or Physics 2 3 

Home Economics 119 or 120 2 

Home Economics 112 3 

Electives _4-7 

~1B 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Art 57 or 

Home Economics 136 3 

Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 33 or 

Elective 2 

Home Economics 123 or 

Elective 2 

Home Economics 102 3 

Electives 1-2 

~15 



Second Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Home Economics 52 or 

Elective 3 

Home Economics 133 or 

Elective 2 

Home Economics * or 2 

Home Economics 33 or 

Elective 2 

Home Economics * 3 

Electives 6-8 



E. HOME RELATIONSHIPS AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 



First Semester 



JUNIOR YEAR 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Home Economics 32 3 

Sociology 21 3 

Home Economics 21 3 



Second Semester 



15 



SEM. 
HRS. 



15 



Psychology 26 3 

Sociology 33 3 

Physics 3 3 

Home Economics 120 2 

Home Economics 31 3 

Electives 1 

~15 



* Course not yet definitely determined. 



Requirements fob the Bachelor Degree 



61 



First Semester 



SENIOR YEAR 

SEM. 



HRS. 

Psychology 37 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 38 2 

Home Economics 165 3 

Home Economics 128 3 

Electives 2 

15 



Second Semester 



Psychology 42 

Home Economics * 

Home Economics 33 

Home Economics * 

Electives 



SEM. 
HRS. 

3 

2 

2 

3 

5 



15 



F. EDUCATION 



1. Teacher Training 

2. Cooperative Extension Service 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Home Economics 12 3 

Home Economics 21 3 

^Elective 3 

15 



Second Semester 



Physics 3 

Psychology 22 

Home Economics 120 ... 

Home Economics 31 ... 

Home Economics 61 or 

^Elective 



SEM. 
HRS. 

3 

3 



. 3 
. 2 
. 2 
15 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester sem. 

hrs. 

Sociology 21 3 

Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 33 or 136 2 

Home Economics 62 or 

fMeth. in Coop. Ext. Serv. r 2 

Home Economics 63 or 

tCoop. Ext. Exper. or Elect 3 

iElective r 0-3 

~15 



Second Semester 



Home Economics 33 or 136 
Home Economics 63 or 
fCoop. Ext. Exper. or 

IElective 

JElectives 



SEM. 

HRS. 

2 



3 

.10-13 



15 



* Course not yet definitely determined. 

t State requirements must be met for teaching certification. 

t By special arrangement. 



62 



The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 



G. INSTITUTION ECONOMICS 



1. Hospital Dietetics 

2. Institution House Administration 

3. Institution Pood Service 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Sociology 21 3 

Economics 25 3 

Psychology 21 3 

Physics 1 or 3 3 

Home Economics 21 3 



15 



Second Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Chemistry 36 or 

Elective 3 

Home Economics 120 2 

Home Economics 20 3 

Home Economics 31 3 

Economics 38 2 

Home Economics 61 or 

Elective 2 

"15 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 

Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 134 2 

Home Economics 130 or 

Elective 3 

Home Economics 41 2 

Home Economics 43 3 

Home Economics 33 or 

Elective 2 

Electives 0^> 

15 



Second Semester 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Home Economics 66a or 

Elective 1 

Home Economics 33 or 

Elective 2 

Home Economics 45 or 111 3 

Home Economics 42 2 

Home Economics 44 3 

Elective 6-4 



15 



Requirements fob the Bachelor Degree 



63 



3. 



IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

SEM. 
SOPHOMORE HRS. 

English 11-12 6 

Chemistry 1-2 or 3-4 6 

Foreign Language (second year).. 6 
Psychology 21-22 6 

Physical Education 41 ( 6 

Home Economics 28 {" 

Physical Education — 

30 

SEM. 
SENIOR HRS. 

Biology 73-74 6 

Sociology 21-26 6 

Physical Education 61-62 4 

Physical Education 63-64 4 

Physical Education 65-66 4 

Health Education 67 } 4 

Physical Education 68 \ 

Physical Education 69-70 2 

Physical Education Practice — 

30 

In addition to the hours of academic credit, Physical Education major 
students are required to complete the following hours in Physical Edu- 
cation : 

SEMESTER 
HOURS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

SEM. 
FRESHMAN HRS. 

English 1-2 6 

History 3-4 8 

Biology 1-2 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Hygiene 1-2 ~ 4 

Physical Education 

30 

SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Biology 71 3 

Physical Education 75-76 6 

Education 13-69 6 

Physical Education 51-52 4 

Physical Education 59-60 2 

Physical Education Practice 
♦Elective 9 



30 



FRESHMAN 

First Semester 



Second Semester 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester 



Second Semester 

JUNIOR 

First Semester 



Second Semester 



SENIOR 

First Semester 



,P.E. 13, Hockey, y 2 hr. 
P.E. 15, Soccer, V 2 hr. 
iP.E. 14, Baseball, % hr. 
I P.E. 16, Track, % hr. 

I P.E. 17, Swimming, y 2 hr. 
IP.E. 19, Rhythms, V 2 hr. 
rP.E. 18, Gymnastics, y 2 hr. 
P.E. 20, Basketball, % hr. 
IP.E. 22, First Aid, 1 hr. 



1 



}-- 



P.E. 53, Athletic Coaching ^ 1 

P.E. 55, Dramatic Games 1 

P.E. 57, Clogging 1 

P.E. 54, Archery 1 

P.E. 56, Tennis ) 1 

P.E. 58, Folk and National Dances \ 



71, Swimming Coaching 1 

73, Tap Dancing 1 

77, Danish Gymnastics 1 

72, Rhythmics 1 



P.E. 

P.E. 

P.E. 

Second Semester P.E. 

P.E. 74, Festival Org 1 

Semester Hours 16 



*Six semester hours must be chosen from the division of Language and Literature and 
the Social Studies. 



64 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

4. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

History 3 4 History 4 4 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Foreign Language* 3 Foreign Language* 3 

Hygiene 2 Hygiene 2 

15 15 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 11 3 English 12 3 

Principles of Economics 11 3 Principles of Economics 12 3 

Political Science 21 3 Psychology 21 3 

Biology 37 or History 12 . 3 History 12 or Biology 37 3 

Foreign Language* or Elective 3 Foreign Language* or Elective 3 

15 15 

SCOPE OF SPECIALIZATION. The courses offered in Secretarial 
Science do not duplicate those offered by a College of Commerce, but 
within this field, are selected so as to make the training thorough, compre- 
hensive, and scientific. The junior and senior subjects in Economics and 
Secretarial Science may be chosen in such a manner as to obtain a coher- 
ent program that will give satisfactory preparation for such positions as 
those of a commercial stenographer, public stenographer, court reporter, 
private secretary, head or supervising stenographer, and office manager. 

Of the 60 hours to be taken in the junior and senior years the follow- 
ing 33 are required: 

Secretarial Science 21-22 (Principles) 8 

Secretarial Science 23 (Advanced) 4 

Secretarial Science 24 (Office Management) 3 

Secretarial Science 26 (Secretarial Correspondence) .... 3 

Economics 29 (Business Organization) 3 

Economics 31-32 (Business Law) 6 

Economics 33-34 (Accounting Principles) 6 

33 

The remaining 27 hours of Electives are to be chosen in consultation 
with the Adviser in charge of the program of study. 
See pages 139-141, for Business Education courses. 



*A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must continue 
a foreign language offered for entrance. 



REGISTRATION 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

In order to aid new students in becoming adjusted to college life as 
quickly as possible, the College has established Freshman Week. The 
program of this week includes mental and physical measurements, 
pre-registration counseling, special lectures on student traditions, 
library tours, and social gatherings, in addition to the registration for 
courses. This program begins with a meeting of all new students in 
Aycock Auditorium at 9 :00 A. M. on Tuesday, September 14. Fresh- 
men and transfer students — all new students except Commercial stu- 
dents — are required to be present at this and all other appointments 
comprising the program of Freshman Week. 

Freshmen and Commercial students will register September 16, 
1937. Former and transfer students will register September 17, 1937. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

THE ACADEMIC AND PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

Guidance of students in academic and extra-curricular matters is 
administered through the Academic and Personnel Committee. This 
committee is composed of the four Class Chairmen and five other 
members of the Faculty, with the Dean of Women as chairman. 
The Committee acts as a clearing agency between the Faculty and 
students in academic matters. 

CLASS CHAIRMEN AND ACADEMIC ADVISERS 

There is a Class Chairman for each of the four classes, one Chair- 
man acting in an advisory capacity to the members of a specified 
class during its entire four years at the college. There are special 
advisers for small groups of Freshmen and Sophomores, and the 
heads of departments advise the Juniors and Seniors majoring in 
their particular departments. In this way each student has indi- 
vidual advice concerning her academic work through her entire col- 
lege course, under the direction of members of the Faculty thorough- 
ly acquainted with her needs and interests. 



66 The Woman's College of the Univebsity of Noeth Carolina 

GENERAL. REGULATIONS 

Not later than May 10 of the freshman, sophomore, and junior 
years, each student shall hand to the Registrar a copy of her program 
of study for the coming year. This program must have the official 
endorsement of the student's Adviser and her Class Chairman. 

The student herself is responsible for fulfilling all requirements 
for the degree for which she is registered. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor's degree must conform to the resi- 
dence requirements of this College. 

Without the permission of her Class Chairman no student may 
register for more than 16 hours of work in any semester, except 
under the following regulations : A.B. and B.S. students may register 
for two half-hour lessons per week in Applied Music (without credit) 
in addition to their regular work so long as they are doing satis- 
factory work in all subjects. 

Requests for permission to register for more than 16 hours should 
be handed to the Class Chairmen not later than May 1 for the first 
semester and December 12 for the second. All permissions for extra 
work are subject to the approval of the College Physician. 

No student may carry less than 12 hours of work. 

CHANGE OF COURSE 

Changes in course should not be made after registration except in 
unusual cases. For one week following registration a student may 
make necessary changes by presenting to the Registrar a change of 
course card signed by her Adviser and her Class Chairman. 

Students are not permitted to enter a course later than one week 
after registration. 

No student is officially dropped from a course until she has pre- 
sented to the Registrar a "change of course" card signed by her Ad- 
viser and her Class Chairman. 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 

At matriculation or at the beginning or the close of any semester 
through the junior year until the requirement has been met, students 
shall be given an opportunity to take a proficiency examination in 
any course required in the freshman and sophomore years. 

No semester hours credit shall be given students for passing pro- 
ficiency examinations on freshman courses, but in courses of sopho- 
more grade and above, half credit shall be given a student who passes 
a proficiency examination. 

Students shall be relieved of requirements covered by the course 
or courses in which the examinations were taken and passed. 



Academic Regulations 67 

ENTRANCE DEFICIENCIES 

Graduates of approved high schools who offer the required fifteen 
units may be admitted to the College. To be admitted as a candidate 
for a degree, the student must meet the specific requirements laid 
down for that degree. If there are deficiencies, they must be made 
good before the student may register for her sophomore year. 

AUDITING COURSES 

Auditing a course is allowed under the following conditions: 

1. No student may audit more than one course a semester. 

2. In order to audit a course a student 

(a) must have the permission of the Faculty member whose 
course is to be audited ; 

(b) must have the permission of her Class Chairman; 

(c) must register for the course in a fashion to be prescribed 
by the Registrar. 

3. A student auditing a course shall be required to meet the same 
attendance requirements as those taking the course for credit. 

4. A Faculty member may request that a student be dropped from 
a course if attendance requirements or other conditions set by 
him are not satisfactorily met. 

CREDITS 

No student may receive credit for any course for which she has not 
officially registered and presented to the instructor a card of admis- 
sion from the Registrar. 

Credit obtained by examination on new work during any term is 
counted as regular work in determining the amount of work carried 
by any student. 

No credit will be given for correspondence or extension work taken 
while a student is in residence at this College. 

Students desiring to apply toward their degrees work taken at the 
summer sessions of other colleges should confer with the Registrar of 
this College for permission to take such courses. Credit will not be 
promised for courses not so approved. 

SUMMER SESSION AND EXTENSION CREDITS 

Summer session students (other than those who have matriculated 
during the regular year of the College) planning to apply their sum- 
mer session work towards a degree must file a record of their entrance 
credits with the Registrar of the College previous to matriculation. 



68 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

In general, students who wish to apply the summer session work 
towards a degree shall fulfill the prerequisites laid down in the regu- 
lar catalogue. 

Not more than one fourth of the requirement for a degree may be 
done by Extension work, and not more than eight semester hours 
may be done in any one year. 

Extension students desiring to apply the credit earned toward a 
degree must conform to the entrance requirements of the College. 

All questions of credit shall be referred to the Kegistrar and the 
Committee on Advanced Standing. 

STATEMENTS OF CREDITS 

Only one full statement of work and credit recorded for each stu- 
dent registered will be furnished without charge. Additional copies 
will be made only on receipt of a fee of one dollar ($1.00) to cover 
clerical expense involved. 

CLASSIFICATION 

At the beginning of the college year the following minimum 
semester hours credit shall be required for the classification indi- 
cated : 

Seniors 84 semester hours 

Juniors 50 semester hours 

Sophomores 21 semester hours 

Freshmen 20 semester hours or 



On recommendation of the appropriate Class Chairman, the Aca- 
demic and Personnel Committee may modify the foregoing regula- 
tions in the case of a meritorious student. 



EXAMINATIONS 

Every student is required to take an examination, if one is given, 
on every course for which she is registered. No examinations may be 
given except during the three regular examination periods of the 
year : September 15, and at the end of each semester. 

Examinations for the removal of conditions and for advanced 
standing before the opening of the Fall semester will be held on Sep- 
tember 15, 1937. 



Academic Regulations 69 

Requests for reexaminations must be made not later than the fol- 
lowing times : 

September 6, for reexaminations to be taken on September 15. 
November 30, for reexaminations to be taken at the end of the 
first semester. 

April 30, for reexaminations to be taken at the end of the second 
semester. 

Blanks on which to apply for Fall reexaminations are sent from 
the Registrar's office during August. In November and April the stu- 
dent must file with her Class Chairman requests for reexaminations 
to be given at the close of the first and second semesters respectively. 

An E may be removed by reexamination before the beginning of 
the corresponding semester of the next year in which the student is 
in residence. If not removed, an E automatically becomes F. At 
the discretion of the instructor a condition received in the first half 
of a year course may also be removed by obtaining a grade of C in the 
last half of the course. Students receiving a grade F must repeat the 
course in order to receive any credit for the course. 

The work for which an I has been given must be completed before 
the beginning of the corresponding semester of the next year in 
which the student is in residence; otherwise the i" automatically be- 
comes an F. 

REPORTS 

A report of the student's work is mailed to the parent or guardian 
at the end of each semester. A report is also sent to each student at 
the end of the first semester. The reports are based upon the follow- 
ing system of marking: 

A — Excellent 

B— Good 

C — Average 

D — Lowest passing mark 

E — Conditioned 

F — Failure 

I — Incomplete 

Students must attain a grade of D to pass in any course. Grade E 
indicates that the student is conditioned, but will be given another 
opportunity to remove the deficiency. An F may be removed only 
by repeating the course. 



70 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

QUALITY POINTS 

Every candidate for a degree must present, in addition to a mini- 
mum of 120 semester hours, at least 204 quality points. The points 
are computed by giving the following values to the grades now in use : 

A 4 quality points C 2 quality points 

B 3 quality points D 1 quality point 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Not fewer than 42 of the last 60 semester hours required for the 
A.B. or B.S. degree shall be done at the "Woman's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. Of these 42 semester hours, at least 30 
shall be done in the regular sessions of the College from September to 
June. In general, 12 of these hours shall be devoted to subjects in the 
department of the student's major interest. 

This does not apply to students who have successfully completed 
three years' work in a standard college and whose credits have been 
accepted by this College. 

ATTENDANCE 

Excuses for all absences caused by illness must be secured from the 
college physicians as explained on page 37. 

Students in the upper classes with a C-average for the previous 
semester are permitted unexcused absences to the number of credit 
hours which they are carrying, the absences to be distributed pro rata 
according to the number of hours credit per course. 

Freshmen are allowed no unexcused absences the first semester. 

The total number of hours credit of the student with more than 
the maximum number of unexcused absences will be reduced. 

Each student should read carefully the present regulations govern- 
ing all absences, which are set forth in detail in the booklet contain- 
ing the Constitution, By-Laws, and Regulations of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association ("The Blue Book"). r 

Resident students ill at their own homes should communicate with 
the College Physician before returning to the campus, and should 
report at the Infirmary within twenty-four hours after their return, 
bringing a certificate of professional attendance signed by their home 
physician. 

EXCLUSION FROM COLLEGE 

During the first semester that a student is enrolled here, she must 
pass six hours of work to remain in college. Every semester after the 
first, a student must pass nine hours to remain in college or to be re- 
admitted. This regulation may be waived at the discretion of the 
Academic and Personnel Committee. 

This regulation does not take account of work that a student pro- 
poses to do during the summer session. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

First semester courses are usually given odd numbers. 

Second semester courses are usually given even numbers. 

A semester hour credit corresponds, unless otherwise stated, to an hour 
class period per week through one semester. 

The Roman number after the course represents its grade. 

Courses of Grade I are primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores; those 
of Grade II, primarily for Sophomores and Juniors; those of Grade III, 
primarily for Juniors and Seniors. Grade TV indicates that graduate 
credit may be earned. For necessary adjustments in grading, see page 55. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART* 

Associate Professors Ivy, Weatherspoon, Peterson; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Sparger; Instructor Skelton. 

1. ART STRUCTURE. 

A basic course in the use of the elements and principles of organization 
common to all art expression. Through many problems in various media, 
creative ability as well as intelligent choice and judgment in the use of 
art will have opportunity for development. One lecture and six studio 
hours each semester. Required of Freshmen in Bachelor of Science in 
Home Economics course. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts 
course. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.50. Mr. Ivy, Mrs. 
Weatherspoon, Miss Peterson, Miss Sparger, Mr. Skelton. (I) 

3. INTRODUCTION TO ART. 

A study of the nature and materials of art and the relation of art to 
physical and cultural environment. The chief purpose of the course is to 
establish a basis for intelligent appreciation. Three lecture hours each 
semester. Elective for Freshmen and Sophomores. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (I) 

22. COSTUME DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION. 

The use of art elements in costume, the relationship of the elements to 
physical characteristics, personality, types of materials, and purpose of 
costume. Experimental problems in designing costumes for various oc- 
casions adapted to physical and personality types and to the different 
structural forms of textiles. One lecture and six studio hours. Pre- 
requisites, Art 1, 3, 24. It is advisable that Art 64 precede this course or 
be taken simultaneously. Students enrolling for this course may not enroll 
for Home Economics 22. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Skelton. (Ill) 

* All students who select Art as a major or minor should enroll for Art 1, 3, 41, 
and 24. Individual interests determine the more advanced work of the student. At 
least Art 1 and 3 should be completed during the freshman and sophomore years. 

The Department has the privilege of retaining students' work for as long a period 
of time as the examples are useful. 

Courses bearing upon the following subjects and other similar ones will be arranged 
as there is demand for such courses: (1) Graphic Arts, (2) Illustration, (3) History 
of Sculpture, (4) Industrial Design, (5) The Art of the Book, (6) History of Costume, 
(7) Stage Design, (8) Landscape Architecture, etc. 



72 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

23. INTERIOR DESIGN. 

The use of art elements in the structural problems of interior design in 
domestic architecture. The relationship of furniture, rugs, wall coverings, 
etc., to the architectural form and to the personalities and activities of the 
occupant of the house. Creative problems in planning and furnishing 
houses of different types and periods will be executed. One lecture and 
six studio hours. Prerequisites, Art 1, 3, 2J t . Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Peterson. (Ill) 

24. COLOR AND DESIGN. 

A continuation of Art Structure with the emphasis on color. A study 
of color theories and the decorative and structural use of color in cre- 
ative problems. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Prereq- 
uisite, Art 1. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy. 
(ID 

25. MODERN ART. 

The origin and development of the important art movements and 
theories beginning with the nineteenth century and continuing through 
the present time. The work of the leaders in various movements will be 
studied. Emphasis is given to contemporary art. Three lecture hours, 
first semester. Elective for Juniors and Seniors. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (II) 

27. COMMERCIAL DESIGN. 

Beginning course for students interested in advertising art. Study of 
design of lettering with opportunity for creative work designing page 
arrangements, cards, booklets, posters, etc. One lecture and six studio 
hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Art 1, 3, 24. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Skelton. (Ill) 

31. INDUSTRIAL ARTS DESIGN. 

Problems in weaving, bookmaking, wood work, and leather tooling are 
designed and executed with consideration of the relationship to industrial 
processes of production. One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. 
Prerequisite, Art 1. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Miss 
Sparger. ('Ill) 

37. ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION. 

A survey course to introduce to the student the art contributions from 
prehistoric times to the present and to develop an appreciation of art 
quality as it has found expression in various ways during different ages. 
Three lecture hours, second semester. Required of Seniors in Bachelor of 
Science in Home Economics course. Elective for other Juniors and Seni- 
ors. Students having credit for Art 3 not eligible. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (Ill) 

39. MODELING. 

A general course in the preparation of clay, designing and modeling 
simple bowls, animal and figure composition in relief and in the round, 
the making of one piece molds and casting in clay. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Elective for Sophomores, Juniors and Seni- 
ors. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. Practically all sup- 
plies will be furnished. Mr. Ivy, Mr. Skelton. (II) 



Department of Art 73 

40. POTTERY. 

A study of the design and the processes of pottery making, primitive 
coil method, use of the potter's wheel, two and three piece mold casting, 
preparation, application, and fusing of glazes. One lecture and six studio 
hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Art 1, 3, 39. Credit, three semester 
hours. Studio fee, $5.00. Practically all supplies will be furnished. Mr. 
Ivy, Mr. Skelton. (Ill) 

41. DRAWING AND COMPOSITION. 

Fundamental principles of drawing and composition emphasized. Study 
of the laws of cylindrical, parallel, and angular perspective both in studio 
and out of doors, using various media. One lecture and six studio hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Mr. Ivy. 
(ID 

42. DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

A continuation of Art 41 with attention to problems in color. This 
course gives the student opportunity for experimental studies in the tech- 
nique of watercolors and oil painting. One lecture and six studio hours, 
second semester. Prerequisites. Art 1, 3, /fl. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy. (Ill) 

44. SCULPTURE. 

A study of the sculptural and plastic problems encountered in various 
sculptural media — terra cotta, stone, and wood — and of the relationship of 
sculpture to architecture and landscape architecture through creative 
problems for specific site and purposes. One lecture and six studio hours 
first semester. Prerequisites, Art 1, 3 39. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee $5.00. Practically all supplies will be furnished. Mr. Ivy, Mr. 
Skelton. (Ill) 

51. ADVANCED DRAWING AND COMPOSITION. 

A continuation of Drawing and Composition with emphasis on prob- 
lems of form, space, and volume as expressed in line, dark and light. One 
lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Art 7, 3, 41. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy, Mr. Skelton. 
(HI) 

53. ART EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

A study of the aims of art in the elementary school, the place of art 
in the integrated program, selection, preparation, and use of illustrative 
material, and creative work to fit the needs of individual students. Two 
lecture and two studio hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Art 1. Cred- 
it, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Sparger. (Ill) 

57. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE. 

A study of architectural forms and the chief historic styles with 
emphasis on the relation of architecture to the civilization which pro- 
duced it. Three lecture hours, second semester. Elective for Sophomores, 
Juniors, and Seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss 
Peterson. (II) 

(Not given in 1937-1938.) 



74 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

59. CRAFTS (TEXTILES). 

A study through creative problems of the processes of textile decoration, 
block-print, tie and dye, batik, stencil, air brush, etc., considering the de- 
sign and the process in its relation to commercial production as well as 
the art quality of the product. One lecture and six studio hours, second 
semester. Prerequisites, Art 1, 3, 24. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $2.00. Miss Sparger. (Ill) 

60. ADVANCED PAINTING. 

Experimental problems in form, volume, space, and light expressed in 
color emphasizing still-life and landscape subjects are executed in both 
oils and watercolors. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. 
Prerequisites, Art 1, 41, J t 2. Credit, three semester hours. Studio -fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Ivy. (Ill) 

62. HISTORY OP PAINTING. 

The main developments in painting are studied through the great crea- 
tive periods from primitive time to the nineteenth century. Three lecture 
hours, second semester. Elective for Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (II) 

64. FIGURE DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

The first part of the course is devoted to figure construction and com- 
position in black and white while the latter half is devoted to problems in 
color. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Art 1, 3, 41, 42. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Skel- 
ton. (HI) 

66. HISTORY OF FURNITURE. 

Period styles of furniture and interior design and the relation of these 
to the life of the time will be studied. Two lecture hours. Elective for 
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. Credit, two semester hours. Studio 
fee, $.75. Miss Peterson. (II) 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

68. ART EDUCATION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 

A study of the aims of art in the secondary school, the curricula of 
typical public schools, selection, preparation, and use of teaching ma- 
terials. Observation and criticism of activities in both junior and senior 
high schools, combined with planning desirable activities for public 
schools will be required. Two lecture hours and two studio hours. Prereq- 
uisite, eighteen semester hours of Art. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Skelton. (Ill) 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

69 AND 70. STUDIO PROBLEMS. 

Advanced work in any phase of Art offered by the Department. This is 
open to Art majors who have shown superior ability and upon the comple- 
tion of eighteen semester hours of Art credit. May be taken only during the 
senior year and with the approval of the head of the Department and the 
instructor with whom the student will work. Three conference or lecture 
hours and a minimum of six clock hours of studio work are required each 
week. Credit, three or six semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00 to $5.00 (work 
chosen will determine fee.) Staff of Department of Art. (Ill) 



ASTRONOMY 

10. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. 

An outline of the basic facts in astronomy and its history, with constel- 
lation study. This course is designed for those interested in the cultural 
side of science and for prospective teachers of General Science and of 
Geography. It has no prerequisite in college mathematics. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. (II) 

For other courses in Astronomy see Department of Mathematics. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professors Givler, Hall; Associate Professors Cold well, Shaftes- 
bury, Ingraham, Williams, Love, Thiel; Assistant Professor 
Crittenden; Instructors Summerell,* Ritchie; Assistants 



Brummitt, Heffner. 



BIOLOGY 



1 AND 2. GENERAL BIOLOGY.** 

A study of selected types of plants and animals designed to acquaint 
the student with the structure, activities, and life relations of organisms. 
Biological principles are stressed. Three laboratory and two recitation 
hours, for the year. Elective for Freshmen and other students in the 
Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of Freshmen in Physical Education 
and of Sophomores in Home Economics. Credit, six semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Miss Coldwell, Mr. Givler, Mr. Hall, Mr. 
Shaftesbury, Miss Ingraham, Mr. Thiel, Mr. Ritchie, Miss Brummitt. (I) 

92. HEREDITY AND EUGENICS. 

This course deals with the history and meaning of the doctrine of 
organic evolution, the theories and mechanism of heredity, and their re- 
lation to the problem of human betterment. Lectures, reading of text and 
reference books with written reports. Three recitation hours, second se- 
semester. Prerequisite, nine hours of a Biological Science. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mr. Givler. (Ill) 

93. THE HISTORY OF BIOLOGY. 

The development of the biological sciences from their ancient medical 
origin is related to that of other sciences, political and cultural history 
in general, and the main outlines of the history of philosophy. One hour 
weekly, first semester. Elective for Juniors and Seniors and recommended 
for all majors in Biology. Prerequisite, nine hours of a Biological Science. 
Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Givler. (Ill) 



* First Semester. 
** Specially qualified students may enter General Botany 21 or 22, or General Zoology 
41 and 42, upon presentation of their high school General Biology note book, if accepted 
after an interview with the head of the Biology Department. 



76 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

101. BIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS. 

Individual studies in Botany, Zoology, or other fields. The laboratory 
work and reading of the student will be guided by a weekly conference 
with the instructor in charge. A written report will be submitted each 
semester. Laboratory work and conferences are arranged. Either semester. 
Elective for approved Seniors. Credit, three or more semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00 per credit hour. (Ill) 

BOTANY 

21. GENERAL BOTANY. 

A survey of the life of seed plants with special emphasis on structure 
and function. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, first semester. 
Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Prerequisite, Biology 1 and 2. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall, Mr. Thiel. 
(ID 

22. GENERAL BOTANY. 

A study of the structure, life history, reproduction, and relationships 
of selected types from the Thallophytes to the Spermatophytes. Three 
laboratory and two recitation hours, second semester. Elective in the 
Bachelor of Arts Course. Prerequisite, Biology 1 and 2. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall, Mr. Thiel. (II) 

24. LOCAL FLORA. 

Methods and principles of plant classification. The identification of 
flowering plants. Field trips. Three laboratory hours and two recitation 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Botany 21 or 22. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

25. HISTOLOGY AND ANATOMY. 

The technique of preparing plant material for anatomical studies; 
methods of killing, imbedding, sectioning and staining. The tissues are 
studied as to origin, differentiation, and organization. Three laboratory 
hours and two recitation hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Botany 21. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. (Ill) 

26. PLANT MORPHOLOGY. 

Comparative morphology of Algae, Fungi, and Mosses. Six laboratory 
hours, and one recitation hour, second semester. Prerequisite, Botany 21 
or 22. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. (Ill) 

(Given upon request.) 

27. PLANT ECOLOGY. 

An elementary study of plants in their natural habitats and in relation 
to the factors of environment such as soil, water, heat, light, and animals. 
Major emphasis will be placed upon the laws of plant distribution and 
the factors involved in plant associations. Three laboratory hours and two 
recitations per iveek, first semester. Prerequisites, Botany 21 or 22. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

28. PLANT MORPHOLOGY. 

Comparative morphology of Ferns, Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. 
Six laboratory hours, and one recitation hour, second semester. Prereq- 
uisite, Botany 21 or 22. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Thiel. (Ill) 

(Given upon request.) 






Department of Biology 77 

30. DISEASES OP PLANTS. 

A study of the diseases of plants, their causal organisms, distribution, 
and methods of prevention and control. Three laboratory hours and two 
recitation hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Botany 21 or 22. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. (Ill) 

ZOOLOGY 

41 AND 42. GENERAL ZOOLOGY. 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, ecology, distribution, and 
economic importance of animals, and of the general principles of animal 
biology, with dissection of types of the principal groups. Three laboratory 
hours and two recitation hours, for the year. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 
2, or equivalent. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a se- 
mester. Mr. Shaftesbury. (II) 

45. ANIMAL ECOLOGY. 

A survey of the relations of animals to the conditions in which they 
live. Three laboratory hours and two recitation hours, first semester. Open 
to Juniors and Seniors approved by the instructor. Minimum prerequisite, 
Biology 1 and 2, and three additional semester hours in Biological Sciences. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (Ill) 

47. ECONOMIC ORNITHOLOGY. 

Laboratory work and lectures on the classification, distribution, food re- 
lations, and conservation of birds. First semester. Prerequisites, Biology 
1 and 2, or equivalent, and approval of the instructor. Credit, one semester 
hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (II) 

48. GENERAL ORNITHOLOGY. 

Chiefly field work on the identification and seasonal distribution of our 
native birds. Each student must be provided with opera glass or low 
power field glass. Second semester. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or equiv- 
alent. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 
(II) 

51. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES. 

A study of the comparative anatomy and evolution of the vertebrates, 
with dissection of a series of types. Six laboratory hours and two recita- 
tion hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Biology i and 2. Credit, four se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (II) 

54. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. 

A comparative study of embryos of frog, chick, and mammal. The 
work includes observation of living material, practical technique, the 
study of serial sections, and dissection of the larger embryos and foetal 
membranes. Six laboratory hours and two recitation hours, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, nine hours in Biological Sciences. Credit, four semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (Ill) 

56. PARASITOLOGY. 

An introductory study of the biology, life histories, distribution, and 
control of animal parasites, with special reference to those producing 
diseases of man and domestic animals. Three laboratory hours and two 
recitation hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Zoology J t l and 1/2 or Bac- 
teriology 81. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. (Ill) 



78 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

71. MAMMALIAN ANATOMY. 

Human anatomy is studied by means of skeletons, anatomical prepara- 
tions, models, a manikin, and demonstration of human dissections. The 
cat and other mammals are dissected. Three laboratory and two recitation 
hours, first semester. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of 
Juniors in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Phys- 
ical Education. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or Biology 3. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Miss Heffner. (Ill) 

72. HISTOLOGY AND ORGANOLOGY. 

A study of the microscopic structure of the principal tissues and organs 
of the animal body, with practical work in histological technique. Six 
laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second semester. Elective in the 
Bachelor of Arts Course, and Bachelor of Science in Physical Educa- 
tion Course. Prerequisite, Anatomy and Physiology 71, or equivalent. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams. (Ill) 

73. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE NEUROMUSCULAR SYSTEM, RESPIRA- 
TION AND CIRCULATION. 

A detailed study of muscle, nerve, blood, circulation and respiration. 
Adaptations to exercise. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, first 
semester. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of Seniors in 
the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Educa- 
tion. Prerequisites, Anatomy and Physiology 11 or 77, and Chemistry 1 and 
2, or 8 and 4- Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Williams. (Ill) 

74. PHYSIOLOGY OF DIGESTION, METABOLISM, EXCRETION AND 
REPRODUCTION. 

The course includes a study of the chemistry and physiological processes 
of digestion, secretion, respiratory exchange, and excretion. Physiological 
embryology. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, second semester. 
Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of Seniors in the course 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. Prereq- 
uisites, Anatomy and Physiology 73 or equivalent, and Chemistry 1 and 
2, or 3 and 4- Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss 
Williams. (Ill) 

75. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY. 

Lecture course. A presentation of the main facts and important recent 
advances in physiology as they apply to man. Two recitation or demon- 
stration hours and one quiz hour per week, each semester. Elective for 
Juniors or Seniors. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, and Chemistry 1 and 
2, or 3 and 4, or equivalent. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Williams. 
(HI) 
77. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE HUMAN BODY. 

A brief consideration of the structure and functions of each system of 
the human body. Three laboratory hours and two recitation hours, each se- 
mester. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of Sophomores 
in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or Biology 3. Chemistry 1 and 
2, or 8 and 4, prerequisites or parallel. Credit, three semester hours. Labo- 
ratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Miss Heffner. (II) 



Department of Biology 79 

BACTERIOLOGY 

81. GENERAL BACTERIOLOGY. 

A general survey of the fundamental facts of bacteriology. Laboratory 
technique is emphasized. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, 
each semester. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of 
Sophomores in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Home Economics. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or Biology 3. Chemistry 
1 and 2, or 3 and 4> prerequisites, or parallel. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Love, Miss Heffner. ('II) 

82. PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY. 

The relation of bacteria to disease in man. Clinical and diagnostic 
methods; the characteristics, isolation and identification of pathogenic 
micro-organisms. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second se- 
mester. Prerequisite, Bacteriology 81. Credit, three semester hours. Labo- 
ratory fee, $2.00. Miss Love, Miss Heffner. (Ill) 

83. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. 

Examination of blood, spinal fluid, and other body fluids. Designed for 
medical laboratory technicians. Six laboratory hours and one recitation 
hour, first semester. Prerequisite, Bacteriology 82. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 
Miss Love. (Ill) 

84. IMMUNOLOGY. 

Animals are inoculated with certain antigens and serological reactions 
demonstrated. Designed for medical laboratory technicians. Six labo- 
ratory hours and one recitation hour, second semester. Prerequisite, Bac- 
teriology 83. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Love. (Ill) 

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE 

33. NATURE STUDY. 

A general course intended to aid teachers in interesting pupils of both 
elementary and secondary schools in the common objects of nature. A 
number of the laboratory periods will be used for field study. Three labo- 
ratory and two recitation hours, each semester. Required of candidates for 
all primary certificates. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Hall. (II) 

GEOGRAPHY 

35. GENERAL GEOGRAPHY. 

A study of the fundamental distribution patterns of the world. Natural 
features, especially climates, landforms, vegetation, and soils are studied 
with a view toward broadening the background for the various fields of 
college work. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, each semester. 
Required of all candidates for primary, grammar grade, and high school 
certificates to teach general science. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Crittenden, Miss Summerell. (II) 

36. ELEMENTS OF REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 

Description and analysis of the major regions of the world with par- 
ticular emphasis upon human settlement and the use of the lands. Three 
recitation hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Geography 35. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Crittenden. (II) 



80 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Carolina 

37. INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY. 

The geography of economic production. Included for study are im- 
portant raw commodities, as food, textile fibers, timber, and minerals; 
the distribution of selected examples of the major types of manufacturing 
industries; and the relation between resources, manufacturing, trade, 
trade routes, and national policies and development. Students desiring 
loth Geography 35 and 37 should take course 35 first if possible. Three 
hours, each semester. Required of Sophomores pursuing the course in Sec- 
retarial Administration. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Crittenden. (II) 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Schaeffer, Petty; Associate Professor Barrow; In- 
structors Cook, Peck;** Assistants Parker, Tyler. 

1 AND 2. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

A general course designed to give the student who has had no previous 
preparation in the science, a view of the various fields of chemistry, an 
understanding of its more important theories, together with an apprecia- 
tion of its relationship to other sciences and its applications in industry, 
commerce, the household, etc. Three laboratory and two recitation hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 each semes- 
ter. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Petty, Miss Barrow, Miss Cook, Miss Peck, Miss 
Parker, Miss Tyler. (I) 

3 AND 4. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

A general course designed for those students who have had high school 
chemistry. Three laboratory and two recitation hours for the year. Offered 
to students who present one unit in Chemistry for entrance. Credit, six se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss 
Parker, Miss Tyler. (I) 

21. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

The lectures in this course deal with the theories underlying the 
methods of inorganic qualitative analysis. The laboratory work includes 
the separation and identification of the metallic radicals and of the more 
important non-metallic radicals. Six laboratory hours and one recitation 
hour, first semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 1 and 2, or 3 and h- Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Cook. (II) 

22. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

An introduction to quantitative analysis including a study of the prin- 
ciples and methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. In the labo- 
ratory work the main emphasis is placed upon volumetric methods. Six 
laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second semester. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 21. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss 
Cook. (Ill) 

23. BRIEF COURSE IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

An introduction to Organic Chemistry, including the carbohydrates. 
Three laboratory and two recitation hours, first semester. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 1 and 2, or 3 and //. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Miss Barrow, Miss Parker. (II) 



** Second semester. 



Department of Chemistry 31 

24. BRIEF COURSE IN FOOD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemistry of Lipins, Proteins, digestion, metabolism, and excretion, 
with some work in urine and blood analysis. Three laboratory and two 
recitation hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 23. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory -fee, $4.00. Miss Barrow, Miss Parker. 
(HI) 

31 AND 32. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

This includes the study of the Aliphatic Hydrocarbons, their derivatives, 
Fats, Carbohydrates, Proteins, and the Aromatic Series of organic com- 
pounds. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour for the year. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 1 and 2, or 3 and 4- Credit, six semester hours. Labo- 
ratory fee, $4.00 each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Peck. 
(Chemistry 31 is Grade II; Chemistry 32 is Grade III.) 

33 AND 34. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

The Aromatic Series, with special organic preparations relating to 
drugs, dyes, and biological processes. Six laboratory hours and one reci- 
tation hour for the year. Prerequisite, Chemistry 31, 32. Credit, six se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 each semester. Miss Schaeffer. (Ill) 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

35 AND 36. BIOCHEMISTRY. 

The chemistry of the Carbohydrates, Lipins, Proteins, with studies in 
digestion, urine and blood analysis, and organic tissues. Six laboratory 
hours and one recitation hour. Prerequisite, Chemistry 31-32, or 23-24- 
Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 each semester. Miss 
Barrow. (Ill) 

41. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

A continuation of Chemistry 22. In the laboratory work the emphasis 
is placed upon gravimetric methods of analysis. Six laboratory hours and 
one lecture period, first semester. Prerequisite or parallel, Chemistry 22. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4-00. Miss Cook. (Ill) 

42. HISTORY OF CHEMISTRY. 

Three recitation hours per iveeh with reading assignments, reports, and 
discussions ; second semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 21 or 31. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Schaeffer. (Ill) 

43. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 

An introduction to the principles and problems of physical chemistry. 
In the laboratory the student is given practice in making some typical 
physico-chemical measurements. Six laboratory hours and one recitation 
hour, first semester. Prerequisites, Chemistry 21 and 22 or 31 and 32; 
Mathematics 1 and 2 or 3 and 4 1 Physics 1 and 2 or 5 and 6. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Schaeffer. (Ill) 

44. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 

A continuation of Chemistry 43. Six laboratory hours and one recita- 
tion hour, second semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 43. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Schaeffer. (Ill) 



82 Th e Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Assistant Professor Jernigan; Associate Professor Denneen. 

GREEK 

1 AND 2. GREEK FOR BEGINNERS. 

Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles of Greek grammar, 
and special attention is given to the correlation of Greek grammar with 
the grammar of modern languages, particularly English. This course is 
recommended for students of language, religion, or medicine. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (I) 

3 AND 4. XENOPHON'S ANABASIS: LUCIAN'S DIALOGUES. 

The purpose of this course is to develop fluency in the reading of Greek 
and to study Greek clarity of thought. Some attention is paid to Greek 
conceptions of literature. Three hours for the year. Prerequisites, Greek 1 
and 2, or two entrance units. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 
(II) 

35. GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 

No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Introductory lectures are 
given on the art of epic poetry and the influence of the Greek and Roman 
epic upon subsequent literature. Homer and Vergil are read and studied 
in translation. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

36. GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 

This course is devoted mainly to the study of Greek tragedy through 
the medium of translations, though some attention is paid to other types 
of Greek and Roman literature. This is accompanied by lectures on Greek 
literary and religious conceptions, on the ideals which made Greek cul- 
ture preeminent in the history of thought, and on the influence of Greek 
literature upon subsequent thought. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

LATIN 

1 AND 2. LATIN FOR BEGINNERS. 

Fundamentals of Grammar and the reading of stories from Caesar and 
Ovid. This course is designed not only to teach Latin grammar and style, 
but also to make constant comparisons between Latin and English gram- 
mar and to teach purity of diction. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (I) 

3 AND 4. ROMAN ORATORY. 

Cicero's Orations and readings from Ovid's Metamorphoses, together 
with prose compositions. Three hours for the year. Prerequisite, Latin 1 
and 2, or two entrance units. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Denneen. 
(I) 
5 AND 6. VERGIL'S MNEIB I-VI. 

With lectures on pertinent topics. Three hours for the year. Prerequi- 
site, Latin 3 and 4, or three entrance units. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss Denneen. (I) 



Department of Classical Civilization 83 

7. THE SOCIAL LIFE OF ROME. 

Selected readings from Nepos, the letters of Cicero and Pliny the 
Younger. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, four entrance units or 
three entrance units by consent of the instructor. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jernigan. (II) 

8. HORACE. 

Selections from the Odes and Epodes. Three hours, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Latin 5 and 6, or four entrance units. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jernigan. (II) 

9. LATIN PROSE AND POETRY: SELECTIONS. 

Sallust, Ovid, Suetonius, Gellius. Three hours, first semester. Prerequi- 
site four entrance units or three entrance units by consent of the in- 
structor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (II) 

10. LATIN PROSE AND POETRY: SELECTIONS. 

Cicero^ Be Senectute, Be Amicitia; Catallus, Shorter Poems. A contin- 
uation of Latin 9. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Latin 5 
and 6, or four entrance units. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jer- 
nigan. (II) 

COURSES FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

Not all of courses 21-31 will he offered in any one year; a selection will 
be made meeting as far as possible the needs and desires of students ma- 
joring in Latin. Courses in other phases of the literature will be offered 
as needed. 

21. ROMAN COMEDY. 

Plautus. Three hours, first semester. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

22. ROMAN COMEDY. 

Terence. Three hours, second semester. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

23. ELEGIAC POETRY. 

Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. A study of Latin Elegiac 
poetry: its sources, types, and influence. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

24. HISTORY AND POLITICS IN THE TIMES OF JULIUS CAESAR. 
A study of the period 63-44 B. C. Readings from Sallust's Catiline, 

Suetonius's Life of Julius Caesar, Caesar's Gallic War and Civil War, and 
Cicero's Orations and Letters. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

25. ROME AND CARTHAGE. 

Readings from Livy, Books XXI-XLV, and Tacitus. Development of 
Rome as a World power from the First Punic War until the subjugation 
of Macedon. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

26. OVID. 

Reading and interpretation of selections from the Heroides, Amores, 
Tristia, Epistulae ex Ponto, and the Metamorphoses. The influence upon 
subsequent literature. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 



84 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

31. ADVANCED PROSE COMPOSITION. 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan. (Ill) 

33 AND 34. VERGIL. 

Readings in the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. A study of the art of 
Vergil in its development. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

35. ROMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 

See Classical Civilization 35. (Ill) 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Professors Keisteb, Kykeb ? Teague; Assistant Professor Joyce; In- 
structor Shohan. 

11. PRINCIPLES OP ECONOMICS. 

A study of the present-day economic system. Such topics as the follow- 
ing are considered: specialization; the effects of machinery; large-scale 
production; functions of middlemen and markets; speculation; demand, 
supply, and prices; money, credit, and banking. Three hours, -first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister, Mr. Shohan. (II) 

12. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 

Business cycles and depressions; international trade, foreign exchange, 
and protective tariffs; monopolies and their regulation; the distribution 
of wealth in modern society; consumption; proposals to change the eco- 
nomic order. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Keister, Mr. Shohan. (II) 

23. TAXATION AND GOVERNMENT FINANCE. 

The chief governmental expenditures and the main sources of revenue 
used by governments. Property taxes, income and inheritance taxes, 
license and franchise taxes, and various forms of sales taxes will be dis- 
cussed. A comparison of the tax burden on different classes in society. 
Improvements needed in the tax structure. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. (Ill) 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

24. LABOR PROBLEMS. 

A study of the basis for the conflict between workers and employers, 
and some of the more important results of this conflict of interest, such as 
labor organizations, collective bargaining, labor legislation, and the agita- 
tion for change in the present capitalistic system. Certain special prob- 
lems presented by the entrance of women into industry will be studied. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Shohan. 

(HI) 

25. GENERAL ECONOMICS— BRIEFER COURSE. 

A survey of our economic organization, emphasizing specialization, 
markets, middlemen, money, banking, profits, and wages. Three hours, 
first semester. Required of Juniors in the School of Home Economics 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Shohan. (Ill) 



Depaktment of Economics 85 

26. INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY. 
Same as Biology 37. (II) 

27. MONEY AND BANKING. 

How our different varieties of money and credit instruments are issued 
and secured; the functions performed by money in our society; how the 
funds necessary to carry on modern business are assembled and shifted 
to those who can use them most profitably; the services of bond houses, 
stock exchanges, commercial banks, and the Federal Reserve System. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister 
(III) 

28. THE MANAGEMENT OP PERSONAL FINANCES. 

Budgeting and keeping account of one's personal funds; depositing and 
borrowing money; saving and investing. The chief investments, with 
the advantages and disadvantages of each: savings accounts at interest, 
shares in building and loan associations, life insurance, purchase of real 
estate, bonds and mortgages, and corporation stocks. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. (Ill) 

29. BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

Some business principles helpful to young women, especially to those 
who may be considering a business career. How a business is organized — 
the individual owner, the partnership, and the corporation. The depart- 
ments and the functions of each within a firm, such as production, buying, 
selling, advertising, financing, and accounting. Three hours, each semest- 
er. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Shohan. (Ill) 

30. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of the 
functions, policies, and institutions involved in the marketing of raw 
materials, manufactured goods, and agricultural products. The marketing 
problems of the farmer, of the manufacturer, of various middlemen, and 
of different types of retailers will be studied. Present day marketing 
trends and policies will be considered in their relation to marketing cost 

and efficiency. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 

hours. Mr. Shohan. (HI) 

31 AND 32. BUSINESS LAW. 

The aim of this course will be to familiarize the student with the gen- 
eral principles of business law, including such subjects as contracts, 
agency, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, and 
bankruptcy. Three hours, throughout the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Teague. (Ill) 

33 AND 34. ACCOUNTING. 

How the accounts of a business are kept and how reports are compiled 
from these accounts. To give the student a mastery of the fundamentals 
of accounting, exercises and problems will be required. Business forms, 
documents, and practices will be analyzed to give a familiarity with mod- 
ern business procedure. Three hours, throughout the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Kyker. (Ill) 



86 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

38. INSTITUTIONAL ACCOUNTING. 

This course will deal with those fundamental principles and techniques 
of debiting, crediting; books of original entry, books of classified entry; 
posting, adjusting, and closing entries; the preparation of financial re- 
ports and summaries, and their interpretation. These fundamental 
principles will be applied to the business procedures and the accounting 
methods of a tea room, a school cafeteria, the nutrition department of a 
hospital, a college residence hall, a city club, and similar organizations. 
Two laboratory hours and one recitation, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Joyce. (Ill) 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professors Cook, Kephart, Spier, Fitzgerald; Associate Professors 
Clittts, Kimmel, Denneen, Smith; Assistant Professors Krei- 
meier, Land, MacFadyen, Reger, Fitzgerald, Mehaffie, 
Krug, Gunter, Lloyd; Instructors Flintom, Ladd. 

OPPORTUNITY FOR OBSERVATION AND TEACHING 
UNDER SUPERVISION 

The Curry School, located on the campus, is maintained as an integral 
part of the College under the direction of the Department of Education. 
The Curry School includes all phases of public school work from the 
kindergarten through high school, and more than 400 pupils are enrolled 
in it from a representative district of the city of Greensboro. The school 
offers in its program music, physical education, home economics, com- 
mercial education, and elementary art. The high school is a member of 
the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Among the advantages of the Curry School is a library containing over 
4,200 books, 5,000 pictures, numerous pamphlets, clippings and material 
aids for units of study on many subjects. In addition the library also 
serves as a laboratory in which pupils, student-teachers, and supervisors 
may become acquainted with books and readings for boys and girls as 
well as with the functions and uses of the library in the public schools. 
Classroom teachers also have opportunity to become acquainted with the 
possibilities of the library as a means of public education. 

13. THE AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL. 

The purpose of the course is to gain a broad outlook on American edu- 
cational conditions. A study of the origin and traditions of our educa- 
tional institutions, their social purposes and the effect of these influences 
on theories and practices is made. The course is designed for prospective 
teachers and liberal arts students who wish to understand the educational 
problem from the citizenship point of view. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Spier. (Ill) 

14. PUBLIC EDUCATION. 

A study of current movements and problems in public education in the 
United States and in North Carolina. A syllabus and assigned readings 
are employed. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Spier. (Ill) 



Department of Education 87 



31. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS. 

A study of tests used in elementary grades, including giving tests in 
the Training School with tabulations and interpretations of results. One 
hour, second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

33. THE USE OF BOOKS AND THE LIBRARY. 

The aim of this course is to give through problems, discussions, and 
lectures a thorough acquaintance with basic reference tools and facility 
in their use; and also to give training in the use of the library with 
special emphasis upon classification, or library arrangement of books, the 
card catalogue, and magazine indexes. It is designed to acquaint students 
with standard works of reference, that their use may facilitate work in 
all fields of study. It is open to students in all departments of the Col- 
lege. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Reger. (Ill) 

34. USE OP THE LIBRARY IN CLASSROOM TEACHING. 

This course is a study of reference materials used in connection with 
the school course of study, their use, their presentation to children, the 
interpretation and practical use of the school library, and the inter- 
relation of the library and the school curriculum. The objectives of the 
course are to give prospective teachers a background of organized library 
materials related to the curriculum, training in the care and use of books 
in relation to teaching, and methods for directing pupil library experi- 
ence. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Reger. (Ill) 

36. LIBRARY MATERIALS AND METHODS IN RELATION TO CLASS- 
ROOM TEACHING. 
This course is a study of enrichment materials related to the curric- 
ulum, their source, collection, care and use. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. (Ill) 

41-A. READING METHODS FOR PRIMARY GRADES. 

This course deals with recent scientific investigation in the field of pri- 
mary reading and the methods of teaching the subject in the first, second, 
and third grades. Studies of modern reading texts, required readings, 
discussions and reports. This course includes systematic observation in 
the Training School. Two hours, first semester. Open to Seniors and 
approved Juniors. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Spier. (Ill) 

41-B. PRIMARY CURRICULAR PROBLEMS. 

This course contains primary problems not covered in the other primary 
method courses, including methods in arithmetic, writing, and spelling. 
The course includes systematic observation in the Training School. Two 
hours, first semester. Open to Seniors and approved Juniors. Prerequi- 
site, approval of the instructor. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Spier. 
(HI) 

42. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 

This course will include an extensive study of children's literature: the 
principles underlying the selection and organization of literary material 
for primary grades; dramatization and story- telling and other factors, 



88 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

including the activities of the children which influence oral and written 
speech. This course also includes systematic observation in the Training 
School. Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of the in- 
structor. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Spier. (Ill) 

43. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARITHMETIC AND ENGLISH 

FOR THE INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADES. 

The purposes of this course are to organize the content to be taught in 
arithmetic, reading, spelling, and language in the intermediate and upper 
grades, and to develop with the students an understanding of the aims 
and methods of teaching these subjects. There will be systematic obser- 
vation in the Training School. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, 
approval of the instructor. Open to Seniors and approved Juniors. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Fitzgerald. (Ill) 

44. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY 

FOR THE INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADES. 

In this course the purposes are as follows: to organize the content to 
be taught in geography and history in the intermediate and upper grades; 
to develop with the students an understanding of the aims and methods 
of teaching these subjects; and through the working out of individual 
and group projects to give the prospective teacher practice in planning 
the teaching of large units. There will be systematic observation in the 
Training School. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval 
of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Fitzgerald. (Ill) 

45. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH. 

This course is intended for teachers of English in the secondary school. 
The first part of the course deals with methods of instruction in the 
language-composition branch of English; the second part deals with the 
reading-literature branch of the curriculum. Emphasis is placed upon 
the study and practice of the methods of teaching composition, grammar, 
and literature — the choice, the interpretation, the arrangement, and the 
presentation of materials. Recent scientific tests and measurements and 
the minimum-essentials program are also stressed. Systematic observa- 
tion and demonstration work in the high school are included. Prerequi- 
site, Education 69. Credit, three semester hours, either semester. Miss 
Kreimeier. (Ill) 

46. PROBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. 

This course is planned for Seniors who have already made a study of 
the Technique of Teaching. The purpose is to examine some of the more 
fundamental administrative problems which condition the effectiveness of 
the classroom teacher. Among the topics discussed are: The scope and 
function of the high school and its relation to the elementary school and 
the college; the junior high school; vocational information; the high- 
school curriculum; control of pupils; and extra-curricular activities. A 
syllabus and assigned readings are used as the basis for the work. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. (Ill) 



Department of Education 89 

*47. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. 

This course aims to give practical help in the problems that arise in the 
teaching of French. Among the topics considered will be the following: 
the general aims and methods of teaching a modern language; the organi- 
zation of a course of study in French; the basis for judging textbooks; 
reference books for the teacher; recent scientific tests in French; the 
work of the Modern Foreign Language Study. Systematic observation of 
the teaching of French in the high school. Three hours, either semester. 
Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet the approval of the 
instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Ladd. (Ill) 

49. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE. 

The organization of the course in general science, sources of material, 
the texts, laboratory equipment, and other problems of the science teacher 
will be discussed. The course includes systematic observation of the 
teaching of science in the high school. Three hours, first semester. Pre- 
requisite, content and professional courses to meet the approval of the 
instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

53. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL SOCIAL 
STUDIES. 
A study of the organization of history and social science courses in 
junior and senior high school. Such topics as choice of texts, reference 
works, equipment, and supplementary material will be considered. Ob- 
servation of the teaching of these subjects in the high school. Three 
hours, either semester. Education 69, prerequisite, or to be taken jointly 
for professional credit. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Lloyd. (Ill) 

55. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL LATIN. 

Discussion of aims and general methods of teaching Latin; methods of 
teaching specific points — vocabulary, derivatives, forms, syntax and trans- 
lation — with emphasis on the work of the first year; devices for arousing 
interest; text-books and supplementary books; standard tests in Latin; 
recommendations from the report of the Classical Investigation. Observa- 
tion of the teaching of Latin in the high school. Three hours, either se- 
mester. Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet the ap- 
proval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Denneen. 
(Ill) 

57. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the problems 
involved in the selection, organization, and presentation of the materials 
in high school mathematics. Emphasis will be placed upon the parts 
played by social and psychological factors which enter into these prob- 
lems. Observation of the teaching of mathematics in the high school. 
Three hours, either semester. Prerequisite, content and professional 
courses to meet the approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Kimmel. (Ill) 



* French majors who have had no courses in Spanish should take Education 47. 
French majors with a minor in Spanish should take Education 47 together with one 
hour of Education 77, two semester hours being given to the study of methods and one 
hour each to French and Spanish. Credit for work in both courses, four semester hours. 



90 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

61. TEACHING UNDER SUPERVISION. 

Students are assigned to the specific kind of teaching which they expect 
to do — elementary, primary, intermediate, upper grade, or high school. 
Students before arranging their college program should consult the Train- 
ing School program. 

The work is done in the Training School under the direction of the 
head of the department and under a supervisor for each grade or subject. 
After a period of observation, student teachers are made fully responsible 
for a certain part of the teaching throughout the semester, which includes 
the details of school management during their time of teaching. The same 
period each day for five days must be given to this work. Weekly and 
daily conferences are held by supervisors for constructive criticism of 
teaching and planning new lessons. The principles of the special method 
courses are continuously applied to teaching, so that theory may con- 
stantly function in the improvement of teaching skill and that experience 
in teaching may give meaning and interest to theory and principles. 
Daily work in Training School, either semester. Prerequisite, Education 
64, 68 or 69, or equivalent; special methods should be taken conjointly. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Kephart and Supervisors. (Ill) 

63. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND CLASS ROOM MANAGEMENT. 

This course includes: types of school organization, school discipline, 
punishment, problems of school grading and marking, preparation of 
teachers, agencies for teachers' growth in service, records and reports, 
the daily program, attendance and health of school children, community 
relations and duties, school ethics, and character training. Observation 
of teaching in different grades to study problems of school management 
and to assist students in deciding as to the field of teaching to be chosen. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Fitz- 
gerald, Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

64. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING FOR PROSPECTIVE PRIMARY 

TEACHERS. 
This course includes a study of the school as an ideal environment for 
the development and growth of the primary child and the field work of 
the teacher in the primary school. Teaching is considered as a fine art 
in providing proper stimuli to child activity and learning. The course 
includes systematic observation and participation in the primary grades 
of the Training School. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, a 
course in Psychology or its equivalent. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Spier. (Ill) 

66. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING. 

Required of Juniors in School of Home Economics. Three hours, either 
semester. Prerequisite, three semester hours of Psychology. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. (Ill) 

68. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN THE GRAMMAR GRADES. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Fitz- 
gerald. (Ill) 

69. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Clutts. (Ill) 



Department of Education 91 

70. SOCIAL INTERPRETATIONS OF EDUCATION. 

A study of Education as a socializing force and of various social agen- 
cies as educative factors; and of the school in its relation to the com- 
munity, the state, the church, and other institutions, and to the changing 
social ideals and policies. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two se* 
mester hours. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

81. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 

A study of the physical, biological, psychological, and social bases of 
education with an interpretation of the principles that underlie and affect 
the curriculum, methods, educational aims, types of school organization, 
modern educational problems and theories, moral and vocational educa* 
tion, and the school as a social agency. Three hours, either semester. For 
Seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

83. MORAL EDUCATION. 

A practical course for teachers and others interested in moral problems. 
The following problems will be studied and investigated: origin of mor- 
als; theories of morals; cause of and proposed remedies for juvenile de- 
linquency and crime; influential agencies affecting character, such as 
churches, schools, radios, movies, current literature, the youth movement; 
growth of city population and changing ideals of right and wrong. The 
aim of this course will be the formulation of constructive suggestions by 
which good citizenship and character may be developed by cooperation of 
the public schools with other agencies. Three hours, either semester. Pre- 
requisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Cook. 

88. LITERATURE FOR THE GRAMMAR GRADES. 

The aim of the course is to introduce to the prospective teacher the 
abundant material of literary value in folk-lore and in medieval and mod- 
ern prose and verse, and to help her judge its social and ethical value to 
the child. Required of applicants for grammar-grade certificates. Two 
hours, second semester. Miss Fitzgerald. (Ill) 

89. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. 

This course is designed to give an historical background for the study 
and interpretation of present educational problems. Educational develop- 
ment of Western Europe and interpretation in the light of social and 
political conditions. Attention will be given to a study of the life and 
theories of the educational leaders of different periods. Three hours, first 
semester. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Clutts. (Ill) 

98. EDUCATION IN THE KINDERGARTEN. 

This course deals with the physical, mental, and social development of 
the kindergarten child. The activities, equipment, and methods obtaining 
in the kindergarten will be stressed. Observation in the kindergarten and 
in the first grade of the Curry School is included as a part of the course. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Spier. 
(HI) 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES FOR BUSINESS TEACHERS. 
(See page 139.) 



92 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Smith, Hall, Taylor, Hurley, Dunn; Associate Pro- 
fessors Gould, Eowley, Wilson, Tillett, Painter, Summer- 
ell; Instructors Bush, Moses, Kohler; Assistant Stern. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. Fresh- 
men whose level of proficiency in English Composition is below the re- 
quired standard shall be enrolled in a course without credit until the re- 
quired standard is attained. Any undergraduate whose work in any 
course gives evidence of lack of proficiency in written English shall be 
brought to the attention of a committee from the English Department. 
The committee after investigating the student's work will arrange for 
the removal of the deficiency and will determine when the deficiency has 
been removed. This Committee on the Use of English by Students is 
composed of the following members: Miss Summerell, Miss Bush, Mr. 
Wilson. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

I AND 2. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 

Reading and analysis of prose with emphasis on composition. Frequent 
themes; reports on assigned readings, and personal conferences. For 
Freshmen. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Hurley, Mr. Dunn, Miss Gould, Miss Rowley, Mr. Wilson, Miss Tillett, Mr. 
Painter, Miss Summerell, Miss Bush, Miss Kohler. (I) 

II AND 12. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. 

A survey course of English literature down to the beginning of the 
twentieth century. Outlines, written themes, and oral reports. Personal 
conferences. For Sophomores. Three hours for the year. Credit, six se- 
mester hours. Mr. Hall, Mr. Hurley, Miss Gould, Miss Rowley, Mr. Wil- 
son, Miss Tillett, Mr. Painter, Miss Summerell, Miss Bush. (II) 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Advisory Committee: Mr. Wilson, Mr. Hurley, Miss Summerell, Miss 
Tillett. 

Subject to the approval of the head of the department, any of the fol- 
lowing courses may be elected by Juniors and Seniors. They should be 
so elected, however, as to come under some general study scheme of 
literary periods, forms, and movements. It is important also that due 
consideration be given to a proper correlation of English with other sub- 
jects, notably, Latin, the Romance Languages, German, History, and, for 
those who expect to teach, Education. Students who in the judgment of 
the Advisory Committee have a creditable record in the subject may elect 
English as their major study. Such students will be expected to take not 
less than twenty-four nor more than thirty-six semester hours of elective 
English, one course of which should be in prose. At least ten of the re- 
quired semester hours must be taken from the following: 

English 36: Chaucer; English 39, 40: Shakespeare; English 41: Mil- 
ton; English 59, 60: Eighteenth Century Prose; English 43, 44: Ro- 
manticism; English 45, 46: Nineteenth Century Poets; English 47, 48: 



Department of English 93 

The English Novel; English 49: Spenser; English 50: Nineteenth Cen- 
tury Prose — The Essay; English 51, 52: American Literature; English 
95, 96: Anglo-Saxon, Middle English; English 113, 114: The English 
Language. 

15. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. 

A course the basis of which is grammar, planned for those students who 
would understand more fully the fundamentals of speech and written 
composition. Ball's Constructive English is the text. Two hours, first 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Prerequisite, English 1 and 2. 
Mr. Dunn. (II) 

17. THE SPEAKING VOICE. 

The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; enunciation and 
pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; with exercises designed to overcome 
the defects of the individual voice. Two hours, first semester. Credit, tivo 
semester hours. Mr. Moses. (II) 

18. PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

The principles and practice of parliamentary lav/ and conduct of meet- 
ings, followed by training in the delivery and organization of the original 
speech. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Moses. (II) 

21. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

This course supplements the required course in composition. It is 
arranged especially for students who intend to make English their major 
subject. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Prereq- 
uisite, English 1 and 2. Miss Tillett. (II) 

22. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A continuation of English 21, with special emphasis upon description 
and narration. Students who have not had English 21 should consult the 
instructor before registering for this course. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tillett. (II) 

23. THE WRITING OF NEWS. 

An elementary course in journalism, with special emphasis on the 
gathering and writing of news. Students will study practical newspaper 
making in the plants of the local papers. Two hours, first semester. Credit. 
two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (II) 

24. THE EDITING OF NEWS. 

This course is intended to supplement English 23 and will be concerned 
for the most part with newspaper desk work, including editing, headline 
writing, and make-up. Newspaper policies and methods will be considered, 
with a study of present day tendencies. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (II) 

25. CREATIVE WRITING. 

Advanced composition, including practice in the short story, the essay, 
and other literary forms. Lectures, readings from modern and con- 
temporary literature in each of the forms studied. A limited number of 
students will be admitted to this course. Students desiring to take the 
course should consult the instructor before registering. Two hours, for the 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (Ill) 



94 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

26. CREATIVE WRITING. 

A continuation of English 25. Students desiring to take this course 
should consult the instructor before registering. Two hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (Ill) 

27 AND 28. PLAY PRODUCTION. 

A study of the cultural and educative possibilities of amateur dramatics. 
Especially recommended to prospective teachers and social workers who 
will be called upon to coach amateur theatricals in their schools and com- 
munities. Theory and laboratory work in directing, acting, scene-design- 
ing, costuming, lighting, make-up, and stage-setting. Plays will be studied 
and presented in class. Two recitations and three laboratory hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. 
Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

29 AND 30. PLAY WRITING AND ADVANCED PRODUCTION. 

Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique. A student 
not primarily interested in the actual writing of plays may take this 
course and fulfill its requirements in part by working out problems of 
production, although a certain amount of dramatic composition will be 
required of everyone. The number of students admitted to the course 
must be limited to twelve. Three hours, for the year. Prerequisite, English 
27 and 28, and the approval of the instructor. Credit, six semester hours. 
Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

*33. THE SHAKESPEARIAN THEATRE. 

A study of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the theatre: play- 
wrights, producers, technicians. They will be considered as practical men 
of the theatre whose first purpose was to furnish entertainment and in- 
struction for Elizabeth and her London. Certain plays will be studied in- 
tensively, and (if the personnel of the class warrants) will be produced 
in part or as a whole. The style, manner ,and staging of these produc- 
tions will be as nearly like that actually practiced by Shakespeare as is 
possible. Junior and Senior elective. Open to specially qualified Sopho- 
mores by permission of the head of the English Department and of the 
instructor. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mjrj. 
Taylor. (Ill) 

*34. THE SHAKESPEARIAN THEATRE. 

A continuation of English 33. Method, nature, and objectives will be 
the same, except that different plays will be studied and produced. Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

36. CHAUCER. 

A study of the major and certain of the minor poems of Chaucer, with 
literary rather than linguistic emphasis. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Summerell. (Ill) 

39. SHAKESPEARE. 

The plays will be taken in approximate chronological order, the first 
semester being devoted, for the most part, to the chronicle plays and 
comedies. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Kohler. (Ill) 



* Either English 33 or 34 may be taken for credit without the other. 



Department of English 95 

40. SHAKESPEARE. 

A continuation of Course 39; the tragedies and romances. Two hours, 
second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Kohier. (Ill) 

41. MILTON. 

A study of the poetry of Milton culminating in Paradise Lost, with out- 
side assignments in his prose and in other literature of the Puritan period. 
Special attention is given to the chief ideas in the poems, and to the de- 
velopment of Milton's personal powers against the social, political, and re- 
ligious background of the seventeenth century. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Rowley. (Ill) 

43. ROMANTICISM IN ENGLISH POETRY, 1780-1805. 

The new interest in external nature, the influence of democracy, and the 
subjective attitude toward life and literature will be studied, with atten- 
tion to such writers as Cowper, Burns, Blake, and more especially, Words- 
worth and Coleridge. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

44. THE LATER ROMANTICISTS, 1805-1825. 

A continuation of Course 43. The second semester will be devoted to 
the study of Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

45. BRITISH POETS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of the poetry of Tennyson and Arnold, with outside assignments 
on Clough, Swinburne, and Rossetti. Emphasis is given to the oral in- 
terpretation of poetry and especially to its vitality as embodying the high- 
er ideals of modern thought and conduct. Two hours, first semester. Cred- 
it, two semester hours. Prerequisite, six semester hours of English Liter- 
ature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

46. BRITISH POETS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

The poetry of Robert Browning. An interpretative study of Browning's 
Lyrics, Romances, Men and Women, Dramatis Personae, and a selected 
number of tragedies. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Prerequisite, six semester hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. 
(Ill) 

47. THE NOVEL. 

An historical and critical survey of the English novel from Richardson 
to the twentieth century. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Hurley. (Ill) 

48. THE CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. 

This course is intended to introduce to the student the notable English 
novelists of the twentieth century, and to help her to evaluate the newer 
books in terms of modern life as well as of literary art. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. (Ill) 

49. SPENSER AND THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. 

The course will include all the important Elizabethans except Shakes- 
peare, and will emphasize certain of the critical and social ideals of the 
English Renaissance. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Gould. (Ill) 



96 The Woman's College of the University of North Caeolina 

50. NINETEENTH CENTURY PROSE: THE ESSAY. 

A study of the great prose writers of the nineteenth century and of 
their influence upon contemporary life and thought. In particular, Lamb, 
De Quincey, Macaulay, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Arnold, and Stevenson 
will be studied. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Gould. (Ill) 

51. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

A survey of the early periods of American life and literature, with 
especial study of the beginnings of romanticism, and with emphasis upon 
the expansion of our literature in Irving, Cooper, Bryant, Poe, and 
Hawthorne. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Hall. (Ill) 

52. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

A critical study of Emerson, Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, Lowell, 
Whitman, Lanier, and writers of the West. The emphasis, as in English 
51, will be upon the expression of the national character and upon the 
originality of the contribution made by these writers. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

53. AMERICAN LITERATURE: THE NOVEL. 

The beginnings of American fiction in the eighteenth century and its 
development through the nineteenth will be studied in relation to the 
growth of fiction writing as an art and the reflection of changing phases 
of American life. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Hurley. (Ill) 

54. AMERICAN LITERATURE: PROSE WRITERS OF THE PAST 
FIFTY YEARS. 

A study of American literature since the 1880's as an expression of the 
social and intellectual conditions of the American people. Special attention 
is given to the prose literature of New England, the West, and the South 
following the Reconstruction Period, and to the general tendencies of 
American literature since 1890. Reports on assigned topics are required. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 
(Ill) 

56. THE FRONTIER IN THE LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH AND 
WEST. 

A study of the literature and literary influences of the Frontier in the 
South, Southwest, and West. An attempt will be made to relate the 
vitality of modern American literature to the social, political, and philos- 
ophical forces emerging from the advancing Frontier. Ballads, cowboy 
songs, and writings of such humorists as Crockett, Longstreet, Baldwin, 
Bill Arp, Harris, Josh Billings, John Phoenix, Locke, Artemus Ward, 
Harte, and Mark Twain will be emphasized. The course will involve read- 
ings in and reports on significant phases of Frontier life and literature. 
(History 35 furnishes an excellent background for this course.) Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

57. CONTEMPORARY POETRY. 

A study of contemporary poets whose writings reflect the changing 
social, political, and ethical conventions of our present civilization. Such 
representative English and American poets as Gibson, Brooke, Yeats, 



Department of English 97 

Hardy, Housman, Kipling^ De La Mare, Noyes, Masefield, Amy Lowell, 
Robinson, Frost, Masters, Emily Dickinson, Millay, Sandburg and Lindsay 
will be studied. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Prerequisite, six semester hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

58. CONTEMPORARY POETRY. 

A continuation of Course 57. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Prerequisite, six semester hours of English literature. Mr. 
Smith. (Ill) 

59. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

This course entails an intensive study of Defoe and the rise of peri- 
odical literature; satires of Addison, Steele, and Swift; and the conflicting 
philosophies of Shaftesbury and Mandeville. In the field of drama the 
transition between Restoration ideals and those of the emerging middle 
class will be considered in the works of Farquhar, Congreve, Steele, and 
Lillo. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Painter. 
(Ill) 

60. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of English life and thought as manifested in the various literary 
impulses of the latter half of the century. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Painter. (Ill) 

62. THE CONTEMPORARY ESSAY. 

The modern essay, considered as a medium of contemporary expression. 
Essays by present-day American and English writers will be studied. Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (II) 

71. THE LITERARY STUDY OP THE BIBLE. 

A reverently critical study of the Bible as a part of the world's great 
literature. The purpose sought in the course may be said to be a fuller 
comprehension of the truth of the Bible through a more intelligent appre- 
ciation of its excellences of form and structure. Representative master- 
pieces will be considered — among them essays, orations, stories, and 
poems. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. 
(ID 

72. THE LITERARY STUDY OP THE BIBLE. 

A continuation of Course 71. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Smith. (II) 

76. THE PROSE AND POETRY OP MATTHEW ARNOLD. 

A study of the poetry and literary essays of Arnold. One hour, second 
semester. Credit, one semester hour. Prerequisite, six semester hours of 
English Literature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

79. STUDIES IN THE NOVEL. 

The course requires a critical reading of the major works of some one 
or two recognized masters among the old English novelists. In 1935-1936 
the works of Jane Austen were studied. One hour, first semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Mr. Hurley. (II) 



98 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

80. STUDIES IN THE NOVEL. 

A continuation of English 79 with emphasis on the Contemporary Novel. 
In 1935-1936 Arnold Bennett and John Galsworthy — a realist and a ro- 
manticist — were studied. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Mr. Hurley. (II) 

82. STUDIES IN MODERN DRAMA. 

Such representative writers as Ibsen, Hauptmann, Sudermann, Brieux, 
Hervieu, Rostand, Maeterlinck, Shaw, Barrie, Synge, Echegaray, Drink- 
water, Moody, and O'Neill will be studied. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

83. FAMILIAR LETTERS. 

A brief historical study of the familiar letter, followed by a closer 
study of letters, both English and American, since the early eighteenth 
century. Limited practice in writing. Two hours, first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Summerell. (II) 

84. THE SHORT STORY. 

A study of the history and development of the Short Story with analysis 
and discussion of the best classic and contemporary stories, both Euro- 
pean and American. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Rowley. (II) 

85. REPRESENTATIVE AMERICAN PLAYS. 

The course will be a brief history of the American theatre. Due atten- 
tion will be paid to the influence of actors, actresses, and producers on 
the development of the drama, together with a consideration of the plays 
of representative playwrights. Three hours for the first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Taylor. (II) 

91. EUGENE O'NEILL AND THE EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE. 

A study of recent experimentalists in drama with chief emphasis on 
O'Neill as the American exponent. One hour, first semester. Credit, one se- 
mester hour. Mr. Taylor. (II) 

92. PLAYS OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW. 

A study of Shaw's contribution to the theatre and of his significance in 
the literary world of the last four decades. One hour, second semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Taylor. (II) 

93. BIOGRAPHY. 

An historical and critical study of European and American biography 
from the time of Plutarch to the nineteenth century. Two hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Tillett. (Ill) 

94. BIOGRAPHY. 

A study of nineteenth and twentieth century biography with particular 
emphasis upon recent interpretation of the form. Two hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Tillett. (Ill) 



Department of English 99 

95. ANGLO-SAXON. 

An introductory course. Grammar and readings in Anglo-Saxon prose 
and poetry. In both this course and English 96 a comparative study be- 
tween Anglo-Saxon and modern English will be made with the view of se- 
curing a more comprehensive understanding of modern word usage and 
problems in modern grammar. Three hours, -first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 

96. MIDDLE ENGLISH. 

Grammar and readings in Middle English prose and poetry; a study of 
Middle English language and literature. See Course 95. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 

113. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

The origin and nature of language. The Indo-European languages. 
The vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation of the earlier periods of 
English as related to modern English. The influence of other languages 
— especially Greek, Latin, and French — upon English; prefixes, suffixes, 
derivatives; semantics; current spelling; proper names. Both this course 
and its companion course will be taught with the view of providing students 
with an intelligent understanding of their language for use in life as 
well as in teaching. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 

114. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

A study of the three types of American pronunciation and of Southern 
British pronunciation. Attention will be given to Southern American 
pronunciation in its historical relation to the British. Discussion of the 
"standards" of speech. Critical examination and frequent use of the lead- 
ing British and American dictionaries. The alphabet of the International 
Phonetic Association will be used. See English 113. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 



FRENCH 

See Department of Romance Languages, 



GEOGRAPHY 

See page 79. 



100 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Professor Schoch; Assistant Professor Rosinger; Instructor Alt- 
vater. 

Students who do not offer any German for entrance will take German 
1 and 2. Students offering two or three units of German will take German 
3 and 4, 5 and 6, or 11 and 12, according to ability. 

Not all courses 21-33 will be given in any one year; a selection meeting 
as far as possible the needs and desires of the students choosing the 
courses will be made. The time for recitation will then be arranged. 

As far as practicable, German is the language of the classroom. 

I AND 2. ELEMENTARY COURSES. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch, 
Mrs. Altvater. (I) 

3 AND 4. INTERMEDIATE COURSE, 

First semester, grammar review, Novellen, and prose cultural reading. 
Second semester, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell or its equivalent. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch. (I) 

3s AND 4s. SPECIAL INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

A more thorough grammar review, Novellen, prose, cultural reading 
and short plays. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Schoch. (I) 

5 AND 6. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. 

Representative works in prose and verse. Essentially a reading course 
for students who have had two years of college German. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch. (II) 

7 AND 8. GRAMMAR REVIEW AND ADVANCED GRAMMAR. 

This course may be taken in conjunction with any course above 3 and 4. 
Required of students wishing to teach German. One hour for the year. 
Credit, two semester hours. (II) 

9 AND 10. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. At the discretion 
of the head of the department, the course may oe taken instead of German 
S and 4. Mr. Rosinger. (II) 

II AND 12. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 1 and 2. This course may fee taken collaterally tenth German S and 4 
as a Sophomore elective. Miss Schoch. (II) 

15 AND 16. BRIEF SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE. 

A study of historical, political, and philosophical backgrounds, social 
tendencies and accompanying expressions of music and art in their rela- 
tion to German literature. Literary productions exemplifying various 
periods and movements of German literature are read in the second semes- 
ter. This course is designed mainly for students presenting three units 
of high school German and who have had aural and oral training in the 
language. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. (II) 



Department of Health 101 

21 AND 22. GOETHE'S LIFE AND SELECTED "WORKS. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch. (Ill) 

25 AND 26. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH AND 
TWENTIETH CENTURIES. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch. (Ill) 

29 AND 30. GERMAN CLASSICS IN ENGLISH FROM MEDIEVAL 
TIMES THROUGH GOETHE'S FAUST. 
A general-culture course designed to acquaint the student with repre- 
sentative masterpieces of German Literature. Lectures on the literary- 
movements in Germany from medieval times to the present. One hour for 
the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Schoch. (Ill) 

31. LESSING. 

Three hours for the first semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

32. SCHILLER. 

Three hours for the second semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

33. GOETHE'S FAUST. 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Schoch. 
(HI) 



GREEK 

See Department of Classical Civilization. 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Medical Division : Dr. Collings, De. Gove, De. Naples ; Hygiene : 
Associate Professor Caelsson; Assistant Professor Haeeis; In- 
structor Shambuegee. 

The medical division has general supervision of health conditions and 
is responsible for student health service. To this end it provides regular 
medical examinations with follow-up work for correction of remediable 
defects, offers office consultations, dispensary service, and medical care of 
sick students. 

The Hygiene division conducts required courses for Freshmen, Senior 
Physical Education Majors, and Commercial students. It offers in addi- 
tion two electives to members of the upper classes. 

1 AND 2. HYGIENE. 

A practical course designed to place before each student the ideal of a 
well-balanced program for daily living and to emphasize her obligation 
to serve society by the promotion of individual, family, and public health. 
Two hours for the year. Required of all Freshmen except those in the 
Home Economics course. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Carlsson, Miss 
Harris, Miss Shamburger. (I) 



102 The Woman's College of the University of Nokth Carolina 

3. HYGIENE. 

A practical course designed to help students to direct their activities 
in accordance with modern health standards. Required of all one-year 
Commercial students. Two hours, one semester. Miss Harris, Miss Sham- 
burger. 

31. HOME AND COMMUNITY HYGIENE. 

Survey of factors of importance in the health of the home and com- 
munity with analysis of methods of disease prevention and of raising 
health standards. Reports, conferences, and visits to local health organi- 
zations. Two hours, first semester. Prerequisite, six semester hours in 
general Biology or Chemistry. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. 
(ID 

32. SCHOOL HYGIENE. 

For those who expect to teach, this course supplies basic information in 
health education. Members of the class will participate in health teach- 
ing. Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, nine semester hours, Hy- 
giene 1 and 2, Education one course, and General Biology or Chemistry. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. (Ill) 

36. HYGIENE. 

First Aid. Theory demonstrations and practice. Official course leading 
to full Red Cross Certification. One hour, second semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Dr. Collings. (II) 

64. HYGIENE. 

Medical Background for Social Case Work. A survey of modern methods 
of medical diagnosis and treatment, with special emphasis on diseases 
likely to be encountered by the social worker. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Restricted to students specializing in the field of case work. Open to 
others only oy special permission. Credit, three semester hours, Dr. 
Collings. (II) 

67. HEALTH EDUCATION. 

A study of aims, methods, and materials for health teaching, and class 
observations in elementary and secondary schools. Two hours, first semes- 
ter. Required of Seniors in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
course. Elective for other Seniors. Prerequisite, nine semester hours, 
Hygiene 1 and 2, Education one course, and General Biology or Chemistry. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. (Ill) 

69. CHILD HYGIENE. 

Development and care of the child from prenatal life through adoles- 
cence. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Hygiene 1 and 2 or Phy- 
siology 75 or 77. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Carlsson. (II) 



Department of History and Political Science 103 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

HISTORY 

Professors Kendeick, Johns, Aenett; Associate Professors Gul- 
landee, Laegent, Deapee; Instructors Mosee, Hege, Pfaff, 
Pfaff*. 

3 AND 4. THE WORLD TODAY IN THE LIGHT OF THE PAST. 

The aim of the course is to help prepare students for meeting the prob- 
lems of citizens today and tomorrow. The unifying themes will be na- 
tionalism, capitalism, democracy, and their incidence. These topics will 
be studied analytically and historically, particularly as they have mani- 
fested themselves in Europe and the United States. Four hours for the 
year. For Freshmen. Credit, eight semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 a 
semester. The teaching staff for this course will be composed of pro- 
fessors and instructors in History, Sociology, and Economics. (I) 

11. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1877. 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of the 
period. Three hours, first semester. Primarily for Sophomores. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johns, Miss Largent. 

12. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877. 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of the 
period. This course may be taken either semester by B.S.S.A. students 
in fulfillment of their Sophomore requirement in recent American His- 
tory. Primarily for Sophomores. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Ken- 
drick, Mr. Johns, Miss Draper. (II) 

32. THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM. 

A survey of Europe in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the cultural, social, and economic aspects 
of the period. Special attention will be devoted to the combination of re- 
action in government with progress in political and economic thought. 
In this last respect this course complements Philosophy 31. (See page 
123.) Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Pfaff. (HI) 

(Offered in 1938-1939 and alternate years.) 

34. THE RISE OF DEMOCRACY AND NATIONALISM. 

A survey of Modern Europe from 1815 to 1870. Particular emphasis 
will be given to economic and political liberalism and to the vogue of 
romanticism and nationalism. The beginnings of the change from the old 
colonialism to modern imperialism will also be stressed. Three hours, 
second semester. Prerequisite, History 3 and 4 or History 51 and 52. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Pfaff. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1937-1938 and alternate years.) 



♦First semester. 



104 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

35. THE SOUTH. 

A study of the part the South has had in the history of the Nation. 
(This course offers a particularly good background for English 56.) Three 
semester hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of history. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Kendrick. (Ill) 

36. THE UNITED STATES FROM THE WORLD WAR TO THE PRES- 
ENT. 

This course is intended for Juniors and Seniors who would familiarize 
themselves in some detail with the history of the United States during 
their own life-time. It should serve to clarify the student's thinking on 
insistent problems which she must face as a citizen. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Kendrick. (Ill) 

37. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY. 

Special emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, and constitu- 
tional development of the English colonies down to the American Revolu- 
tion. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of history. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johns. (Ill) 

41. EUROPE FROM THE 1860'S TO THE WORLD WAR. 

The growth of nationalism, industrialism, imperialism, militarism, and 
the secret alliances that finally produced the World War. Three hours first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, one year of history. 
Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

42. EUROPE FROM THE WORLD WAR TO THE PRESENT. 

The war and its immediate incidence, the resulting revolutions and the 
early spread of democracy and pacifism, the work of the League of Na- 
tions, the rise of Communism, and Fascism, the growth of militant na- 
tionalism and consequent threats to Western Civilization. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, one year of 
history. Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

49 AND 50. THE INDUSTRIAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF ENGLAND 
FROM THE MIDDLE AGES UNTIL THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. 

A study of the principal economic and social problems of England dur- 
ing the period indicated. Two semester hours throughout the year. Prereq- 
uisite, one year of History. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Gullander. 
(ID 

51. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 

A survey of social, economic, political, and intellectual conditions in 
France and the rest of Europe under the Old Regime, followed by a 
study of the movement of the Revolution. Special emphasis will be 
placed upon the social and economic phases. Two hours, first semester. 
Prerequisite, History 3 and 4 (except oy permission). Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Largent. (Ill) 

52. THE NAPOLEONIC ERA. 

Special emphasis will be placed on the European and World aspects of 
the period and upon its influence in producing the guiding principles of 
nineteenth and twentieth century history. Two hours, second semester. 
Prerequisites, History 3 and 4 or History 51 (except oy permission). 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Largent. (Ill) 



Department of History and Political Science 105 

71. ANCIENT CIVILIZATION. 

Tlie successive civilizations that developed in the valley of the Nile, 
Mesopotamia, the Hellenic Peninsula, and Rome will be viewed primarily 
from the social angle. Particular emphasis will be laid on the culture and 
economics thought of the successive groups. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Kendrick. (Ill) 

72. MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION. 

The period from the fifth through the thirteenth centuries will be 
treated with a view to discovering the economic and cultural elements 
of imperial Roman, Byzantine, and Medieval life for their intrinsic 
value and also as foundations of Modern European Civilization. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Draper. 
(Ill) 

81. HISTORY OP NORTH CAROLINA TO 1835. 

A general course covering social, economic, and political conditions and 
developments in the Colony and in the State to the Constitution of 1835. 
Two hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

82. HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1835. 

A continuation of History 81, but may be taken independently. Two 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

45 AND 46. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION. 

This is a course in the background, causes, and progress of the cultural, 

intellectual, and religious movements in Europe from the fourteenth to the 

seventeenth centuries. Two hours for the year. Prerequisite, History 3 and 

4 (except by permission). Credit, four semester hours. Miss Draper. (II) 

(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

83 AND 84. CURRENT HISTORY. 

A study of current affairs, particularly those of an economic and social 
character. Leading periodicals will be used as texts. This course may be 
taken profitably, but not necessarily, in connection with any other two- 
hour course in History. One hour for the year. Prerequisite, one year of 
History. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.25 a semester. 
(II) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Elliott; Assistant Professor Alexander. 
All courses in Political Science carry credit as History. 

21. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. 

This course will be a study of the government of the United States. 
Origin, organization, and development will be emphasized. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the Government in action — elections, law-making, 
and administration. Three hours, either semester. Prerequisite, one year 
of History. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Elliott, Miss Alexander. 
(HI) 



106 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

22. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. 

A continuation of course 21 with attention paid to the same questions 
in the state and local fields. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
one year of History. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. (Ill) 

24. WORLD POLITICS. 

In this course a survey of world politics since 1848 will be made. Im- 
portant treaties, the partition of Africa, the Far East problem, the posi- 
tion of the small and weak states, and the recent efforts to organize the 
nations of the world will be studied. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Elliott. (Ill) 

25. MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. 

The study will include surveys of the different forms of city government, 
its functions, and its problems of administration. The possible reforms in 
municipal government will be discussed. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. (Ill) 

27. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES. 

In this course a survey will be made of the development of political 
parties. Party organizations and activities will be studied. Nominations, 
campaign methods, and party reforms will be discussed. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Edwaeds; Associate Professors Playfoot, Tansil; Assist- 
ant Professors Edwards, Street, Rosa, Naumann; Instructors 

COXE, SlNGLETAEY, YOEK. 

The specialized undergraduate curricula in home economics include 
General Home Economics, Clothing and Textiles, Food and Nutrition, 
Housing, Home Relationships and Child Development, Home Economics 
Education, and Institution Economics. The General Home Economics 
curriculum is planned primarily for students interested in homemaking. 
The Clothing and Textiles, Pood and Nutrition, and Housing curricula 
are presented for students interested in majoring in these subject matter 
fields. The Home Relationships and Child Development curriculum is 
organized for students interested in nursery school work. The Home 
Economics Education curriculum is planned for home economics students 
who are planning to teach or enter cooperative extension service. The 
Institution Economics curriculum is organized for students planning to 
enter the fields of hospital dietetics and other types of institutional work. 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

2. CLOTHING SELECTION AND CONSTRUCTION. 

The factors that influence the individual in the selection, purchase, and 
construction of clothing as revealed by self-analysis; knowledge of cloth- 
ing fabrics; the clothing budget; wardrobe buying procedures. Two lec- 
tures and one three hour laboratory each week. Elective. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. (I) 



Department of Home Economics 107 



12. PATTERN STUDY AND CONSTRUCTION. 

Advanced study of textile fabrics; the foundation pattern, flat pattern 
construction; construction of garments from designed patterns. One lec- 
ture and two three hour laboratories each week. Prerequisites, Home 
Economics 2 and Art 1. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Miss Coxe. (II) 

22. COSTUME DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

This course includes the application of art principles to dress, the study 
of current styles, ways of identifying clothes with the wearer, and dis- 
cussions of fashion influences, trends and predictions. During the labo- 
ratory periods actual clothing and dress accessories are designed and 
constructed. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory each week. 
Prerequisites, Art 1 and Home Economics 12 (or parallel). Elective. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (II) 

24. ADVANCED CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION. 

The development of understanding and appreciation of the use of line, 
form, texture, and color through modeling, draping, and construction of 
garments on the form and human figure. One lecture and two three hour 
laboratories each week. Prerequisites, Home Economics 12 and 22. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. (Ill) 

38. CLOTHING FOR CHILDREN. 

The selection and construction of children's clothing as related to the 
development of the child; brief study of children's clothing through the 
ages. One lecture and one three hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 2. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Coxe. (Ill or IV) 

52. DECORATIVE TEXTILES. 

This course includes a study of the application of art principles in 
planning and executing stitchery designs for articles which may be used 
in home furnishing and costume designing. Two lectures and one three 
hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 102. Elective. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Naumann. 
(Ill) 

102. HISTORIC TEXTILES. 

This course includes a study of the historic and artistic backgrounds 
related to the textiles of various countries from the early Egyptian 
civilization to modern times. The characteristic fibers, weaves, motifs, 
and dyes used in these textiles will be studied. Three lectures each week. 
Prerequisites, History 3 and J^, Home Economics 2, or approved equivalents. 
Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Naumann. (Ill or IV) 

112. CLOTHING AND TEXTILE ECONOMICS. 

The economic phases of the production and distribution of textiles 
directly or indirectly affecting the consumer; clothing needs of families 
of different income levels; responsibility of the consumer in relation to 
conditions in the textile and clothing industry; standardization; labeling; 
shopping ethics. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, Home Eco- 
nomics 2 and Economics 25. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Coxe. (Ill or IV) 



108 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

122. ADVANCED COSTUME DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

This course includes the advanced and creative study of costume design 
and its relation to fashion, materials, the human form, accessories, use, 
and the principles of design. During the laboratory periods actual cloth- 
ing and accessories are designed and constructed. One lecture and two 
three hour laboratories each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 22. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (Ill 
or IV) 

127. HISTORY OF COSTUME. 

This course includes a study of the historic, literary, and artistic back- 
grounds related to the costumes of various countries from the earliest 
civilizations to the present day and their relation to present dress. Three 
lectures each week. Prerequisites, History 3 and 4, Home Economics 22, 
or approved equivalents. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Naumann. 
(Ill or IV) 

154. TEXTILE ANALYSIS. 

A study of the chemical and physical properties of the textile fibers; 
yarn and cloth construction; finish of fabrics; standard testing methods 
used; test results interpreted in terms of consumer information. Two 
lectures and one three hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites, Home 
Economics 2; Chemistry 31 and 32; Physics 1 and 2. Credit, three sem- 
ester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Coxe. (Ill or IV) 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

11. FOOD SELECTION AND PREPARATION. 

A study of foods designed to give the student a scientific understanding 
of the function of foods, a knowledge of the fundamental principles of 
cookery, and the ability to utilize such knowledge in the selection, prep- 
aration and service of standard products. One lecture and two three hour 
laboratories each week. Prerequisites, Chemistry 1 and 2, or 3 and 4, or 
individual approval. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Mrs. Edwards. (I) 

21. MEAL STUDY. 

This course includes the study of meal planning, marketing and costs; 
the selection, preparation, and service of foods in relation to meals. The 
relations of selection, arrangement, and use of equipment and furnishings, 
the planning and use of time, and the techniques of operation to efficient 
and aesthetic meal service are emphasized. Two lectures and one three 
hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 11. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Edwards. (II) 

28. NUTRITION. 

This course includes the study of the nutritive requirements of the 
body for normal health and development, the selection and preparation 
of food in relation to nutrition, dietaries for various ages and special 
dietary conditions. Special emphasis is given to child feeding. Two lec- 
tures and one three hour laboratory each iveek. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Prerequisite or parallel, Chemistry 1 and 2 
or S and 4. Required of Physical Education majors. Elective. Miss Ed- 
wards. (II) 



Department of Home Economics 109 

31. NUTRITION AND DIETETICS. 

This course aims to give the student a knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of nutrition, and to develop the ability to utilize this knowledge 
in the planning of adequate dietaries for the normal individual and for the 
family group living at different economic levels. Two lectures and one 
three hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites, Chemistry 31 and 32, 
Home Economics 21. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 
Mrs. Edwards. (Ill) 

110. FOOD ECONOMICS. 

A course dealing with the problems of food production, markets and 
marketing; food standardization and prices; food utilization in the home. 
Two lectures each week. Prerequisites, Home Economics 21 and Eco- 
nomics 25. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

111. EXPERIMENTAL FOOD STUDY. 

This course aims to give the student an insight into experimental pro- 
cedure through (a) review of recent experimental food studies (b) labo- 
ratory investigation of factors regulating standards in food products and 
preparation. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory each week. 
Prerequisites, Home Economics 31 and Physics 1 and 2 (or parallel). 
Laboratory -fee, $4-00. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill 
or IV) 

128. NUTRITION OF DEVELOPMENT. 

This course relates the normal development and optimal health of the 
child to his nutritional needs from conception through adolescence. Two 
lectures and one three hour laboratory each week. Credit, three semester 
hours. Prerequisite, Home Economics 31. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Mrs. 
Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

130. DIET THERAPY. 

This course deals with the modification of the normal diet to meet the 
dietary requirements of pathological and special conditions which depend 
largely on diet for treatment. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory 
each week. Prerequisites, Home Economics 31 and Chemistry 36. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

HOUSING 

23. THE HOUSE AND ITS FURNISHING. 

In this course a study is made of the planning and furnishing of houses. 
The laboratory work includes the practical problems of house planning in 
relation to family needs and income, the actual arrangement of furniture 
and furnishings, the construction of various furnishings and accessories, 
the remodeling and refurnishing of a college girl's room, and special 
house and room remodeling. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory 
each week. Prerequisite, Art 1. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (II) 

S3. HOME MANAGEMENT. 

Management problems of the homemaker in regard to income, labor, 
time utilization, and family relationships. Application of principles un- 
derlying management through six weeks residence in the home manage- 
ment house. Prerequisite, Home Economics senior ranking. Credit, two 
semester hours. Fee, $1.00. Mrs. Street. (Ill) 



110 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Carolina 

119. HISTORY OF FURNITURE. 

This course includes a study of the historic background related to fur- 
niture of various countries from early civilizations to modern times. 
Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, History 3 and 4, Home Economics 
23, or approved equivalents. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Naumann. 
(Ill or IV) 

120. HOUSING. 

The study of modern housing from the economic and social angles as 
concerned with house planning, building, building regulations, legisla- 
tion, financing, and recent developments in housing. Two lectures each 
week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 23 or equivalent. Elective. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Edwards. (II) 

123. ADVANCED HOME FURNISHING. 

In this course an intensive study is made of past and present house 
furnishings in relation to type and arrangement of house, income, and 
costs; selection, arrangement and adaptation of style and type of furniture 
and furnishings. One lecture and two three hour laboratories each week. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 23. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (Ill or IV) 

133. HOUSEHOLD BUYING. 

This course includes the study of the production, distribution, brand- 
ing, labeling, advertising, legislation and standardization of household 
goods in relation to consumer buying. Two lectures each week. Prereq- 
uisite, Home Economics 33 or individual approval. Elective. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

136. HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT. 

The selection, operation, care and arrangement of household equip- 
ment in relation to income and efficiency in the use of time and labor. 
One lecture and one three hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite, 
Physics 3 or approved equivalent. Elective. Credit, two semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. Street. (Ill) 

137. PROBLEMS IN FAMILY FINANCE. 

Earning and spending the family income, to increase its adequacy and 
insure economic security, household budgeting and accounting; household 
credit, investments and control of property. Two lectures each week. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 13Jf. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. 
Street. (IV) 

139. PROBLEMS IN HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS. 

This course will include the presentation and discussion of present day 
problems in household economics. Three lectures each week. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Edwards. (IV) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 



Department of Home Economics 1 1 1 

HOME RELATIONSHIPS AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

32. CHILD DEVELOPMENT. 

A general course in the physical, mental, and social development of 
the child. Two lectures each week and observation in the nursery school. 
Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, Psychology 21. Elective. Mrs. 
Rosa. (Ill) 

134. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC PROBLEMS OF THE HOME. 

The principles of economics and sociology as applied to problems of 
present-day home and family living — money management, health, housing, 
recreation, legislation, and relationships. Two lectures each week. Pre- 
requisites, Economics 25 and Sociology 21 or equivalents. Credit, two 
semester hours. Elective. Miss Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

150. HOME RELATIONSHIPS. 

A study of the relationships of parents and children as they are affected 
by modern home and family life. Two lectures each week. Prerequisites, 
Home Economics 32 and Sociology 33. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. 
Rosa. (IV) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

61. TEACHING METHODS IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

The aims and principles of education as applied to the field of home 
economics teaching; the organization and administration of home eco- 
nomics in the secondary school; an introduction to curriculum construc- 
tion. Prerequisites, Psychology 22 and Education 66. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Fee $.50. Miss Playfoot, Mrs. Street, Miss York. (Ill) 

62. TEACHING METHODS IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

Continuation of Home Economics 61, with supervised observation of 
vocational home economics teaching. Credit, two semester hours. Fee, 
$.50. Miss Playfoot, Mrs. Street, Miss York. (Ill) 

63. SUPERVISED TEACHING IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

The application of the principles of teaching to situations as found in 
the secondary school with conferences, observations, and teaching under 
supervision. Prerequisite, Home Economics 62 (or parallel). Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Playfoot, Mrs. Street, Miss York. (Ill) 

66a. SUPERVISED TEACHING IN NUTRITION. 

Experience in the teaching of nutrition, especially planned for those 
interested in hospital dietetics and school feeding. Prerequisite, Home 
Economics 61. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Playfoot. (Ill) 

163. FOOD DEMONSTRATION TECHNIQUES. 

A laboratory course dealing with the techniques of food demonstration. 
One lecture and one two hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite, Home 
Economics 31. Elective. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.00. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

165. PARENT EDUCATION METHODS. 

A study of the history and philosophy of parent education; a review of 
typical programs, methods, and materials for parents study with practice 



112 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

in planning lessons and leading adult groups. Two lectures each week 
with observation and practice to be arranged. Prerequisite, Home Eco- 
nomics 32 and 150 (or parallel). Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. 
Rosa. (IV) 

167. NURSERY SCHOOL EDUCATION. 

A course in the theory and practice of nursery school education, in- 
cluding a study of equipping, organizing, and managing a nursery school, 
with supervised teaching in the nursery school. Two lectures each week 
and laboratory to be arranged in the nursery school. Prerequisite, Home 
Economics 32. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. (IV) 

INSTITUTION ECONOMICS 

20. INSTITUTION FOOD STUDY. 

The problems involved in the selection, preparation, and service of food 
on the quantity basis. One lecture and two three hour laboratories each 
week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 21. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory /ee, $5.00. Elective. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

41. INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT. 

The organization of administrative work in the food and house units 
of such institutions as schools, colleges, hospitals, commercial and indus- 
trial institutions; the study of management of employees, materials, 
money, and time; the use of job analysis, work directions and records. 
Two lectures each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 20 (or parallel). 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

42. INSTITUTION BUYING. 

The study of food and equipment. The production, distribution, stor- 
age, grades, standards, and cost of food are studied as well as the selec- 
tion, installation, operation, and cost of equipment. Emphasis is placed 
on the buying procedure, methods, specifications, and records. Visits to 
markets, wholesale houses, and manufacturing plants are made. Two lec- 
tures each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 41. Credit, two sem- 
ester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

43. INSTITUTION EXPERIENCE. 

Practical work in the cafeteria in preparing and serving food. By rota- 
tion of duties, experience is gained in the various units as vegetable and 
salad preparation, bakery, counter service, store room control, money 
management, and dining room care. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the 
job and in achieving high standards of work in each unit. Hours to be 
arranged. Prerequisites, Home Economics 20 and Jfl (or parallel). Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

44. INSTITUTION EXPERIENCE. 

Practical work in the cafeteria in planning meals, buying and storing 
food and in supervising the preparation and serving of food. A study 
of office routine and the operation and efficiency of large equipment. 
Apprentice work is arranged in school lunch rooms and observations in 
hospitals, restaurants, tea rooms, dining halls, and hotels. Emphasis is 
placed on the importance of organization and management. Hours to be 
arranged. Prerequisite, Home Economics 43. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 



Department of Home Economics 113 

45. INSTITUTION HOUSE ADMINISTRATION. 

The furnishing, decoration, and maintenance of institutional house 
units, such as educational and commercial institutions and hospitals. The 
study of materials, records, and employee training. This course trains 
for work as executive housekeepers, supervisors of dormitories, and as 
plant maintenance managers. Three lectures each week. Prerequisite, 
Home Economics 42. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

GENERAL COURSES 

180. SPECIAL PROBLEM IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

An individual problem to be selected by the student with the approval 
of the head of the department. This problem is to be of pertinent in- 
terest to the home and of direct relation to the proposed thesis of the 
student. The problem will be worked out under the supervision of one or 
more staff members. Conference hours to oe arranged. Credit, one to 
four semester hours. Assigned staff member. (IV) 

200. THESIS SEMINAR. 

Reports of progress and discussion of theses and related problems. No 
credit. (IV) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The degree of Master of Science in Home Economics is offered after 
the completion of prescribed courses in home economics and related fields. 
The prerequisites for the degree are a Bachelor of Science degree in Home 
Economics as offered at this institution or at an accredited institution 
offering an approved course in home economics, or a Bachelor's Degree in 
an approved major field from an accredited institution. Before being 
admitted to candidacy, the student must have completed the courses as 
outlined. The requirements for the Master of Science degree are nine 
full courses, six of which shall constitute the major and three the minor. 
The thesis, which is required of all candidates for the degree of Master 
of Science, shall carry the equivalent value of one full course. Other re- 
quirements as outlined by the Graduate School of the University of North 
Carolina must be met. These requirements include a reading knowledge 
of a modern language, a written comprehensive examination in the major 
field, an oral examination on the thesis, residence, and responsibility to 
the major committee. 



ITALIAN 

See Department of Romance Languages 



LATIN 

See Department of Classical Civilization. 



114 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Barton, Strong; Assistant Professor Watkins. 

The courses essential to the major, which is based on 1, 2, or 3, 4, are 5, 
17, 18, 23, 25, 27, 37. The courses essential to the minor, which is based on 
1 and 2, or 3, 4 are 17 and 18. In each case, other courses are to be chosen 
to make up the required number of hours. 

Students who expect to major or minor in Mathematics are urged by 
the department to take Mathematics 1 and 2; those who take Mathematics 
as an elective, whether preparing for the sciences or not, are advised to 
take Mathematics 3 and 4. 

1 AND 2. ALGEBRA AND PLANE TRIGONOMETRY. 

Algebra, three hours, first semester. Plane Trigonometry, three hours, 
second semester. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Barton, Miss Strong, 
Miss Watkins. (I) 

3 AND 4. ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS. 

An introductory course which treats of the graphical representation of 
functions and the elements of Trigonometry, Analytic Geometry, and 
Calculus. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Barton, Miss Strong, Miss Watkins. (I) 

5. SOLID AND SPHERICAL GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Strong. (II) 

7. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

This course is more elementary than Mathematics 17 and is designed 
as an alternative to Mathematics 2 or 4 for those students who have had 
Trigonometry in high school. Students should not elect both Mathematics 
7 and 17. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 or 
3 and a course in Trigonometry. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Barton. (I) 

17. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 and 2, or 3 
and 4' Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (II) 

18. INTRODUCTION TO THE CALCULUS. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 17 or 7. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (II) 

20. COLLEGE GEOMETRY. 

This course includes a rapid review of high school geometry, followed 
by a brief study of the modern geometry of the triangle and circle. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 and 2, or 3 and k 
and approval of instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. 
(Ill) 

23. THEORY OF EQUATIONS. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 25. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Watkins. (Ill) 



Depabtment op Mathematics 1 1 5 

25. ADVANCED ALGEBRA. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 17 or 7. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

27. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. 

Three hours, first semester. A continuation of Mathematics 18. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

28. ADVANCED ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 18. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

30. ADVANCED CALCULUS. 

This course will extend the concepts developed in the elementary Cal- 
culus to functions of more than one variable. It will include a study of 
partial derivatives, multiple integrals with their applications; also some 
elementary work in the solution of differential Equations. Two hours, 
second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 27 or its equivalent. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

32. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 27. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

37. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. 

Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 17 or 7. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Watkins. (Ill) 

41. THEORY OF STATISTICS. 

An introductory course in statistical methods. Such topics as the col- 
lection and classification of data, graphical methods, frequency distribu- 
tion, averages, correlation, index numbers, and time series will be treated. 
This course is designed especially for students in other departments who 
are interested in the fundamental principles of statistical methods. Two 
recitations and one two-hour period for laboratory work, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Watkins. (II) 

The following courses will be given whenever called for : 

24. HIGHER PLANE CURVES. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 27, 28, and 
28. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

31. PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 28. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

33 AND 34. MODERN ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Two hours for the year. Prerequisite, Mathematics 27, 28. Credit, four 
semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 



116 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

ASTRONOMY 

12. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY. 

The practical work includes constellation study, exercises with the 
celestial globe, and elementary observation with field glass and small 
telescope. This course may be used toward a major or minor in Math- 
ematics. Two recitations and one two-hour period for laboratory and ob- 
servational work, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 and 2, or 
3 and 4- Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

35 AND 36. ASTRONOMY. 

A fuller treatment of Descriptive Astronomy than that attempted in 
Course 12. Time to be arranged. Three hours for the year. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 1 and 2, or 3 and 4, and one course in Physics. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss Strong. (HI) 
(Given upon request.) 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Professors Altvater, Brown, Thompson, Fuchs; Associate Pro- 
fessors Minor, Ferrell, More; Instructors Sottthwick, Clem- 
ent, Schneider, Holloway, Hazelman. 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

"Applied Music" refers to the practical study of Piano, Organ, Voice, 
Violin, or Orchestral Instruments, in private individual lessons. See 
School of Music for entrance requirements and classifications of those 
who elect formal courses in music. Private lessons in applied music are 
available to students from other departments whose courses of study 
admit of such extra work. 

COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

1 AND 2. HARMONY AND KEYBOARD HARMONY. 

This course deals with the individuality and unity of melody, harmony, 
and rhythm as elements of musical expression. It aims to develop the 
ability to recognize, in aural analysis, all the diatonic harmonies in both 
major and minor modes, and to employ them in harmonization of both 
given and original melodies. Emphasis is placed upon the conscious mu- 
sical fact rather than upon the written symbols; hence much original 
work is required. Three hours for the year. Required of Freshmen in 
the School of Music. Elective for students in Bachelor of Arts Course. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Fuchs. (I) 

3 AND 4. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

This course gives systematic training in the fundamentals of music 
theory, sight singing and ear training, stressing the elementary problems 
in pitch and rhythm. Individual work is required in both sight singing 
and ear training. Two hours for the year. Required of Freshmen, School 
of Music. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Holloway. (I) 



Department of Music 117 

5 AND 6. THEORY. 

A study of the fundamentals of music theory, as preparation for the 
study of Harmony. Notation, terminology, rhythm, melody writing, sight 
reading, ear training, and the harmonization of simple melodies are 
especially stressed. Two hours for the year. Required of Freshmen taking 
the A.B. course with a major in music. Elective for all A.B. students. 
Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Thompson. (I) 

11 AND 12. ADVANCED HARMONY AND KEYBOARD HARMONY. 

Application of the principles outlined in Music 1-2, to the study of al- 
tered chords, chromatic harmonies, remote and enharmonic modulations. 
Analysis of Schumann Op. 68, Mendelssohn's Song Without Words, etc., as 
a basis for the study of the principles of musical form and harmonic 
analysis. Three hours for the year. Required of Sophomores in the 
School of Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts Course. 
Prerequisite, Music 1-2. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Fuchs. (II) 

13 AND 14. HISTORY OF MUSIC. 

General History of Music, with special attention to the period since the 
year 1600, and with emphasis on the work of the great masters, including 
a critical study of the great orchestra works, the Symphony, the Sym- 
phonic Poem, the Overture, and a number of the most important operas 
of the Italian, the German, and the French schools. Two hours for the 
year. Required of Sophomores in School of Music. Elective for students 
in Bachelor of Arts Course. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Brown. (I) 

15 AND 16. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

This course gives more extensive training in sight singing and ear 
training, studying more difficult problems, including two- and three-part 
material. One hour for the year. Required of Sophomores majoring in 
Music Education, and of Juniors majoring in voice. Prerequisite, Music 
3-4. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Holloway. (II) 

17 AND 18. THEORY. 

This course is planned to lead the student naturally to an organized 
consciousness of the harmonic elements of simple music, and to the 
ability to think tones in combination. This is accomplished by constant 
drill in aural analysis, and by considerable work in keyboard harmoniza- 
tion. By a study of the natural laws of chord progression, the student 
acquires the ability to harmonize simple melodies at the keyboard or in 
written form. Two hours for the year. Required of Sophomores taking 
the A.B. course with a major in music. Prerequisite, Music 5-6. Elective 
for other A.B. students. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 
(II) 

19. HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF MUSIC. 

A general survey of music history before the Christian era. A more 
detailed study of the music and of music history from the beginning of 
the Christian era to the culmination of the polyphonic school as repre- 
sented in the monumental works of J. S. Bach. Through the records and 
scores of the new Carnegie Music Library much of the great music of all 
periods is available for illustration and study. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Required of Sophomores in School of Music. Elective for students 
in Bachelor of Arts Course. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Brown. 



118 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Caeolina 

20. MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION. 

A study of the musical development from 1750 to the present time — a 
knowledge of the history and an intimate acquaintance with important 
works of each of the great classic and romantic composers is required. 
Three hours, second semester. Required of Sophomores in School of 
Music. Elective for students in Bachelor of Arts course. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Brown. (II) 

17 AND 18. PIANO. 

Two hours a week given to advanced work in piano. One hour a week 
given to ensemble work, sight reading, accompanying, and improvisation. 
Three hours for the year. Required of Sophomores in Music Education. 
Prerequisite, Piano 1-2. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Clement. (II) 

21 AND 22. COUNTERPOINT. 

Application of the principles of single and reversible counterpoint, to 
two or more melodies in combination. Study of the various forms of 
polyphonic composition. Two hours for the year. Required of all Juniors 
in the School of Music. Prerequisite, Music 11-12. Credit, four semester 
hours. Mr. Fuchs. (Ill) 

23 AND 24. VOICE TECHNIC. 

Special attention given to voice building, careful study of diction. One 
hour for the year. Required of Juniors in Music Education. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Schneider. (Ill) 

25 AND 26. PIANO TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of fundamental teaching material and best methods of 
presentation to the child mind. Notation, sight reading, ear training, 
rhythm, technique, melody writing, and musical games. Observation of 
children's classes. Three hours for the year. Open to Juniors in School 
of Music majoring in Piano. Prerequisite, Piano 11 and 12. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss Clement. (Ill) 

27. MUSIC APPRECIATION. 

The course in Music Appreciation will be adapted to the needs of the 
general college student who wishes to obtain a better understanding of 
music as an element of liberal culture and to develop the power of listen- 
ing intelligently. No technical knowledge is required for entrance. The 
following subjects will be studied: the orchestra and orchestral instru- 
ments; the materials of music; the fundamental musical forms as illus- 
trated in the standard orchestral literature. Two hours, either semester. 
Elective in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science courses (except 
Bachelor of Science in Music.) Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Thomp- 
son. (Ill) 

28. MUSIC APPRECIATION. 

The literature of chamber music, the opera, oratorio, and song will 
form the subject matter of this course. Two hours, second semester. 
Elective in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science courses (except 
Bachelor of Science in Music). Prerequisite, Music 27. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Mr. Thompson. (Ill) 



Depabtment of Musio 119 

29. CONDUCTING. 

This course will teach the technique of the haton, the essential qualities 
of successful conducting, the fundamentals of choral and orchestral in- 
terpretation and will give practice in conducting, followed by detailed 
criticism by the class and by the instructor. Two hours, first semester. 
Required of Seniors in Music Education. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss More. (Ill) 

31 AND 32. COMPOSITION. 

Required of Seniors majoring in applied music, except voice. Practical 
work in original composition. Four semester hours for the year. Mr. 
Fuchs. (Ill) 

35. MUSIC APPRECIATION METHODS. 

A study of the educational values and aims of music appreciation in 
the schools and the best methods and subject matter for accomplishing 
those aims. Model lessons to the class, observation, and practice teach- 
ing in the Training School will furnish practical application of the meth- 
ods studied. Two hours, first semester. Required of Seniors in Music 
Education. Open to all Seniors in the School of Music. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss More. (Ill) 

36. SELECTION AND USE OF MATERIALS. 

A study of the various sorts of music materials suited to the develop- 
ment of the pupil from childhood to maturity, including several of the 
most used series of school music texts, materials for many sorts of pro- 
grams, and for the various musical organizations of the school and com- 
munity. Two hours, second semester. Required of Seniors in Music Edu- 
cation. Open to all Seniors in the School of Music. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss More. (Ill) 

37 AND 38. CHOIR CONDUCTING. 

This course deals with the organization and training of church choirs, 
the technique of conducting and playing the organ at the same time, and 
a study of various liturgies. It presents a survey of the best material 
available for the average quartet or chorus choir. Two hours for the 
year. Required of all students majoring in Organ. Junior and Senior 
elective for students having had one year of Organ. Credit, four semester 
hours. Mr. Thompson. (Ill) 

39 AND 40. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A study of the larger forms of musical composition. Designed for stu- 
dents who give evidence of marked creative ability. Two hours for the 
year. Elective for students who have taken Music 81-32, or its equivalent. 
Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Fuchs. (Ill) 

41. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight reading necessary for primary 
grade teachers — study of the child voice, rote songs, problems and ma- 
terials of music in grades one to three. Three hours, first semester. Elec- 
tive for Bachelor of Arts students. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Hollo way. (Ill) 



120 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

42. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight reading necessary for inter- 
mediate and upper grade teachers — study of problems and music materials 
in grades four to six. Three hours, second semester. Elective for Bach- 
elor of Arts students. Prerequisite, Music 4L Credit, three semester 

hours. Miss Hollo way. (Ill) 

-. ... 

42-B. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

The essentials of school music problems and materials in the interme- 
diate and upper grades. Three hours, second semester. Elective for 
Bachelor of Arts students ivho have not taken Music 41. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

43 AND 44. PUBLIC SCHOOL METHODS. 

A study of the values and aims of music in the elementary school, the 
subject matter used, and the best methods of presenting the various prob- 
lems encountered in rote and sight singing. Model lessons by the in- 
structor, lesson planning, observation in the Training School, and teach- 
ing of the class by its members are used as means of gaining teaching 
skill. Two hours for the year. Required of Juniors in Music Education. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors majoring in Applied Music. Prerequisites, 
Music 1-2, 3-4. Credit, four semester hours. Miss More. (Ill) 

45 AND 46. HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS. 

A study of music work in junior and senior high schools, including the 
course of study, classes in theory, history, and appreciation; credit for 
outside study; extra-curricular activities and public performances; and 
the relation of the supervisor to the community and to the various mem- 
bers of the school organization. Two hours "for the year. Required of 
Seniors in Music Education. Open to all Seniors in the School of 
Music. Prerequisite, Music 4^-44- Credit, four semester hours. Miss 
More. (Ill) 

47 AND 48. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING.' 

This course lays emphasis on the reading of part work suitable for glee 
Glubs and chorus work in:; grammar • grades and high school. Special 
attention is given to harmonic dictation as it bears on the problem of 
chorus singing. One hour for the year. Required of Junior's majoring in 
Music Education, and Seniors majoring in Voice. Prerequisites, Music 
3-4, 15-16. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

49. ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS— WOOD-WIND AND BRASS. 

Class study of wind instruments, both wood and brass. Each student 
is given opportunity to gain a practical knowledge of several instruments 
— a knowledge which, will be most useful to a student who expects to 
direct school orchestras. Two hours, first semester. Required of Juniors 
in Music Education. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Hazelman. (Ill) 

50. VIOLIN, VIOLA, CELLO, BASS. 

Class instruction. -The object of this course, is to give the student a 
working knowledge. of the stringed instruments. It aims also to prepare 
her to organize and conduct ensemble classes. Required of Juniors in 
Music Education. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Altvater. (Ill) 



Department of Music 121 

51. MUSIC FORM AND STRUCTURE. 

A survey of the structure and form of music as related especially to the 
Dance. Designed especially as an elective for majors in Education and 
in Physical Education. Two recitations weekly, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Mr. Thompson. (Ill) 

61 AND 62. PRACTICE PIANO TEACHING. 

Practice of the principles learned in the methods course by the teaching 
of children under the supervision and direction of the instructor of Piano 
Teaching Methods. Observation of children's classes. Three hours for 
the year. Open to Seniors in the School of Music majoring in Piano. 
Prerequisites. Music 25-26, Piano 21-22. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Clements. (Ill) 

63 AND 64. SUPERVISED TEACHING. 

The daily teaching in various grades of the Training School is pre- 
pared for and supplemented by frequent conferences with supervisors for 
constructive criticism and planning of new work. Three hours for the 
year. Required of all Seniors in Music Education. Prerequisite, Music 
43-Jf/f. Credit, six semester hours. Miss More, Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

65 AND 66. VOICE TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of teaching material. The study of phonetics as applied 
to the singing voice. Special attention to breathing, tone production, tone 
quality, and diction. Observation and practice teaching required. Three 
hours for the year. Elective for Seniors majoring in Voice. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss Schneider. (Ill) 

67 AND 68. VIOLIN TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of material and methods of presentation. Ability to 
teach both class groups and individual pupils through observation and 
practical experience. Three hours for the year. Open to Juniors major- 
ing in Violin. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Altvater. (Ill) 

69 AND 70. PRACTICE VIOLIN TEACHING. 

Application of the problems involved in Music 67 and 68, through the 
teaching of children, under the direct supervision of the Violin Depart- 
ment. Orchestra organization and routine, through active membership in 
the college orchestra. Mr. Altvater. (Ill) 

71 AND 72. FORM AND ANALYSIS. 

Analysis of musical structure in primary, composite, and large forms. 
Constructive work. Two hours for the year. Prerequisites, Music 1, 2, 11, 
12. Credit, four semester hours. (Ill) ' 

73 AND 74. INSTRUMENTATION. 

•Individual characteristics of orchestra instruments; building of the 
orchestral score. One hour for the year. Prerequisites, Music 1, 2, 11, 
12. Credit, two semester hours. (Ill) 

75 AND 76. VOICE TECHNIC. 

Continuation of Music 23-24. Required of Seniors in Music Education. 
One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. (Ill) 



122 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

91 AND 92. COLLEGE CHOIR. 

Membership in the choir is open to all students having a voice of fair 
effectiveness, a correct ear, and some knowledge of musical notation. Two 
rehearsals each week. Credit, one semester hour for the year's work. Mr. 
Thompson. 

93 AND 94. COLLEGE ORCHESTRA. 

Qualified players of orchestra instruments are admitted to membership, 
following try-outs by the conductor. Two rehearsals each week. Credit, 
one semester hour for the year's work. Mr. Altvater. 

95 AND 96. ENSEMBLE PLAYING. 

Participation in performance of chamber music. Elective for qualified 
players on permission of Dean. Two meetings each week. One hour for 
the year. Credit, two hours for the year's work. Staff. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Assistant Professor Rosingeb. 

21. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. 

This course consists of lectures and discussions concerning the theory 
of values, with special attention to ethical values. After making a survey 
of the more elementary topics in the theory of values with constant refer- 
ence to modern problems, certain representative ethical theories will be 
studied. The purpose of this course is to gain a perspective of the prob- 
lems of value which are pertinent to present day activities and to stimu- 
late a desire for mature philosophical thinking. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

22. AESTHETICS. 

A study of the meaning of beauty and of the great philosophies of 
aesthetics. Consideration will be given to the standards and ideals in- 
volved in artistic appreciation; the application of general aesthetic 
principles to the fine and practical arts. Emphasis will be placed upon 
the relation of aesthetic values to other human interests. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

23. ELEMENTARY LOGIC. 

The subject matter consists of an analysis of the formal processes of 
deductive reasoning. The topics to be studied have been expressly chosen 
to meet the practical needs of students. Among other things, the major 
types of fallacies will be examined with a view to increasing the student's 
accuracy of thought. Methods of testing logical rigor will be pre- 
sented, and the students will be given exercises to serve as practical 
applications. The logical theory will be given from a thoroughly modern 
point of view, rather than from the standpoint of traditional syllogistic 
logic. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

24. THE LOGIC OP SCIENCE. 

A study of scientific method, or the logic of reasoning from experi- 
mental data. This will include the methodologies of the social as well 
as the natural sciences. Such concepts as classification, hypotheses, 
theories, diagnoses, probability judgments, the evaluation of data, et 



Department of Philosophy 123 

cetera, and their application to various fields of thought, will he con- 
sidered. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
(HI) 

31. PHILOSOPHICAL AND SCIENTIFIC ASPECTS OF MODERN 

HISTORY. 
Representative modern philosophers and scientists will be studied in 
their relation to cultural movements. This course is designed to com- 
plement History 32, and credit earned in it will be accepted for a major 
or a minor in History. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. (Ill) 

32. FUNDAMENTALS OF SYSTEMATIC REASONING. 

For students interested in continuing the work of Philosophy 23, and 
for students of mathematics and the sciences. Training will be given in 
the organizing of material for systematic presentation by a careful study 
of the logical structure of systems. Consideration will be given to certain 
basic concepts of science. Prerequisite : Philosophy 23 or 2Jf, or two years 
of mathematics, or one year of mathematics and one year of science, or oy 
special permission of the instructor. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. (Ill) 

33. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. 

A study of the major philosophies of ancient Greece. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

34. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 

A study of the works of the chief philosophers of Europe from Descartes 
through Kant. Credit earned in this course will be accepted for a major 
or minor in History unless the student has already received History 
credit in Philosophy 31. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. (Ill) 

41. CONTEMPORARY METAPHYSICS. 

Studies in the writings of contemporary philosophers. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

42. FIELDS OF KNOWLEDGE. 

A retrospective survey of the natural and social sciences which will 
correlate and evaluate the various fields of knowledge so that the student 
will gain a synthesized perspective of the realm of science. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

44. MODERN ETHICAL THEORIES. 

For students of languages and literature, history, economics, political 
theory, and sociology. A study of modern ethical theories. Prerequisite, 
Philosophy 21. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. (Ill) 

45. ADVANCED AESTHETICS. 

For students of art, music, and literature, and all interested in con- 
tinuing the work begun in Philosophy 22. Prerequisite, Philosophy 22. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 



Note: Only five of courses 24-44 will be given in 1937-1938. These will be selected 
to meet as far as possible the needs and desires of students electing Philosophy. 



124 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Coleman; Assistant Professors Maktus, Tisdale, Pitz- 
watee, Instructors White, Davis, Vail; Assistant Pakk. 

A. GENERAL. COURSES 

In addition to the 120 semester hours of academic work required for a 
degree, each student must pass four semesters' work in Physical Education. 

I AND 2. GYMNASTICS, SPORTS AND RHYTHMS. 

In the first semester, fundamental motor skills in sports and rhythms; 
in the second, baseball, tennis, folk dancing, rhythmics, or swimming. 
Two hours for the year. Required of all Freshmen. Miss Fitzwater, Miss 
White, Miss Vail. 

3 AND 4. REMEDIAL AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISES. 

Two hours for the year. Substituted for regular class work on advice 
of the College Physician and the Physical Director. Miss Tisdale. 

5 AND 6. MODIFIED GYMNASTICS. 

Light work in gymnastics, games, and minor sports. Designed for stu- 
dents whose strength and endurance render regular work questionable, 
and for those who need special attention given to posture training. Two 
hours for the year. Miss Fitzwater, Miss Tisdale, Miss White. 

7 AND 8. GYMNASTICS AND GROUP GAMES, SWIMMING. 

Two hours for one semester. Required of all Commercial Students. 
Miss White, Miss Fitzwater. 

II AND 12. GYMNASTICS AND OUTDOOR SPORTS. 

In the first semester, a student may choose between field hockey, swim- 
ming, soccer, basketball, tennis; in the second semester, folk dancing, 
baseball, tennis, archery, clogging, rhythmics, swimming, and diving. 
Two hours for the year. Required of all Sophomores. Miss Fitzwater, 
Miss White, Miss Vail. 

ELECTIVES 

Open only to students who have completed the two-year requirement in 
Physical Education. 

25. THE MODERN DANCE. 

Open only to students who have completed one semester of rhythmics, or 
who can present the necessary skills. The course is concerned with the 
advanced form of dance composition. Two hours, first semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss Vail. (II) 

28. FOLK AND NATIONAL DANCING. 

Open only to students who have had one semester of dancing, or who 
can present the requisite skills. A study will be made of the music, the 
costumes, and the technique of national dance forms, with special em- 
phasis on English and American country dances, as coordinated by Cecil 
Sharp, and on the modern social dance. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Miss White, Miss Fitzwater, Miss Tisdale. (II) 



Department of Physical Education 125 

29. LIFE SAVING AND WATERFRONT SUPERVISION. 

Open only to students who can present the requisite skill in swimming. 
Designed for students interested in Camp Counselorships and summer 
recreation programs. Two hours, second semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Miss Tisdale. (II) 

31. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Methods, material, and organization of the Physical Education cur- 
riculum for Grades I to VI. Required by the State Department of Public 
Instruction for Elementary Teachers' Certificate. Tiuo hours, each sem- 
ester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Coleman. (II) 

32. COMMUNITY RECREATION. 

A study of the organization and administration of programs in Com- 
munity Recreation. Observation of the Greensboro playgrounds, and 
practice in the organization and leadership of social games and Commu- 
nity Festivals. It is advised but not required that Physical Education 31 
be taken before Physical Education 32. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Miss Coleman. (II) 

33. ATHLETICS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. 

Open only to students who can present a playing knowledge of basket- 
ball. The course is designed to assist prospective high school teachers in 
the administration of the athletic program for girls. Coaching and 
tournament organization of basketball, field ball, and volley ball; lead-up 
games for basketball; organization and direction of the Athletic Associa- 
tion for high school girls. Two hours, first semester. Credit, one se- 
mester hour. Miss White. (II) 

35. ATHLETICS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. 

A continuation of Physical Education 33, taking up the coaching of 
baseball, softball, badminton, and games of a recreational type. Organi- 
zation of field days, sports days, and play days for high school girls. Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss White. (II) 

B. TEACHER-TRAINING COURSES FOR MAJOR STUDENTS 

The technical courses in Physical Education are based on the study of 
Education and of Biology. Courses in Language, History, and other acad- 
emic subjects are required in order to secure the cultural background 
essential to women who hope to hold positions in this field of education. 

For entrance requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in 
Physical Education, see page 51. 

No student will be permitted to enter upon or to continue the work of 
the course when in the judgment of the College Physician her physical 
condition renders it inadvisable. 

Students entering with advance credits from other colleges are asked to 
arrange a conference with the Director of Physical Education before 
registering for the Major Course in Physical Education. 

For the requirements for graduation with B.S. in Physical Education, 
see page 63. 



126 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Cabolina 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

41. PLAYGROUND ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

The construction and equipment of school and community playgrounds; 
elementary first aid; scout organization and leadership; playground 
games. Three hours, first semester. Required of Sophomores in Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Coleman, Dr. Collings. 

51. THE TEACHING OP PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

General methods in Education and their application to Physical Educa- 
tion; integration of Principles in general Education and in Physical 
Education. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Martus. 

52. THE CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Studies of state and city programs; standard tests for motor ability 
and physical efficiency. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Martus. 

59 AND 60. LABORATORY (PRACTICE) IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 
Practice in swimming, dancing, gymnastics, and field sports. Required 
of Juniors in Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Vail, Miss Davis, Miss Tisdale. 

61 AND 62. PRACTICE TEACHING. 

Supervised practice in teaching gymnastics, games, dancing, and swim- 
ming. Two hours for the year. Required of Seniors in the Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, four semester hours. Miss 
Martus. 

63 AND 64. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

The first semester is given to a study of the history and literature of 
Physical Education. In the second semester the class studies plans and 
equipment for modern gymnasia and athletic fields, and organizes courses 
in Physical Education for high schools and colleges. The methods of 
supervision in the elementary schools are included. The group also takes 
up the coordination of departments of health and of recreation with 
Physical Education. Two hours, for the year. Required of Seniors in 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, four semester 
hours. Miss Coleman. 

65 AND 66. BODY MECHANICS. 

Lectures and clinical practice in Physiotherapy, with special reference 
to correction of spine and foot deformities. Two hours, for the year. Re- 
quired of Seniors in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. 
Credit, four semester hours. Miss Tisdale. 

67. HEALTH EDUCATION. 

A study of aims, methods, and materials for health teaching in the 
elementary and secondary schools. Two hours, first semester. Required 
of Juniors in Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. 



Depaetment of Physical Education 127 

68. EXAMINATION AND MEASUREMENT. 

Lectures and practice in examinations of the growth and development 
of children and adults. Two hours, second semester. Required of Seniors 
in Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Tisdale. 

69 AND 70. LABORATORY (PRACTICE) IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Advanced practice in the technique of swimming, dancing, gymnastics, 
and field sports. One hour, for the year. Required of Seniors in the 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Fitzwater, Miss Vail, Miss White, Miss Davis. 

75 AND 76. KINESIOLOGY. 

This course deals with the human bones, joints, and muscles concerned 
with physical exercises; the mechanical conditions under which these 
work; the manner in which they enter into the coordinate movements of 
life and of gymnastics and sports. Special emphasis is laid on the appli- 
cation of these principles to the solution of problems of posture and de- 
formities. Three recitation hours, for the year. Required of Juniors in 
the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Edu- 
cation. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Coleman. 



GYMNASIUM OUTFIT 

Every student in the regular college courses must provide herself with 
a regulation gymnasium outfit as follows: 

Two washable suits ($2.25 each) $4.50 

One official jersey 1.00 

Regulation shoes for gymnastics 2.50 

Two pairs ribbed hose (at $.50) 1.00 



$9.00 



Students in the Commercial Courses are not required to purchase jersey. 

This equipment must be secured after coming to college from dealers 
who handle the uniform adopted and required by the Physical Education 
Department. 

No swimming suit except the regulation tank suit may be worn in the 
swimming pool. This suit must be secured through the Department of 
Physical Education, and is laundered by the College after each swimming 
period. The cost of this suit is about $1.25. Students using the pool 
must also have rubber bathing shoes (cost, $.50). 



♦Maximum cost. 



128 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS * 

Professor Waefield; Assistant Professor Tiedeman. 

1 AND 2. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

The aim of this course is three-fold: first, to impart to the student 
some definite knowledge of the physical universe; second, to show how 
this knowledge has promoted inventions; and third, to bring to the stu- 
dent's attention the important role in other fields played by the advances 
of physics. Students taking this course will be divided into two groups; 
those who take it as an elective with no expectation of doing advanced 
work in science will be given material broader in scope and less technical 
in treatment than that given other students. Two recitation hours and 
one laboratory period of three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. 
(I) 

3. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

A short course dealing with the more important fundamental principles 
of Physics and with their applications. Two recitation hours and one 
laboratory period of three hours for one semester. Required of Home 
Economics students. Open to other B.S. and A.B. students subject to the 
approval of the Department and of the Class Chairman. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Tiedeman. (I) 

5 AND 6. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

A general course on the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, and on 
heat, the first semester; and on electricity, sound, and light the second 
semester. Three recitation hours and one laboratory period of three 
hours for the year. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1 and 2. Credit, eight se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. Mr. Warfield. (II) 

7 AND 8. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

The combined contents of this course with Physics 1 and 2 are equiva- 
lent to Physics 5 and 6. One recitation hour for the year. Prerequisites 
or Corequisites, Physics 1 and 2. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. War- 
field. (II) 

9. PHOTOGRAPHY. 

A course designed to teach the student the principles of physics in- 
volved in photography. The course will serve as a foundation for the 
pursuit of photography as a hobby, or for its use as a clinical or re- 
search tool, or in the preparation of teaching or lecture material. Each 
student must have a satisfactory camera available for use during the 
entire course. One lecture hour, and two three hour laboratory periods 
per week each semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Estimated cost of material, $5.00. Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 



* Students who plan to major in Physics are advised to take Mathematics 3-4 in 
the Freshman year and Physics 5-6 in the Sophomore year. Since Physics 5-6 is a 
Grade II course it may be counted toward the major. The courses essential to the major 
are Physics 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26. 



Depaetment of Physios 129 

11. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

An advanced course on laboratory technique and manipulation as in- 
volved in special laboratory problems. One laboratory period of three 
hours, first semester. Approval of instructor is necessary. Prerequisites 
Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, one semester hour. Labor- 
atory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 

12. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

Similar to Physics 11. One laboratory period of three hours, second 
semester. Approval of instructor is necessary. Prerequisites, Physics 1 
and 2, or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 

16. SOUND. 

This is a course planned especially for students of Music, Speech and 
Psychology. It embraces a study of a wide selection of sound phenomena 
and their applications in music, speech, hearing, architecture, and modern 
electro-mechanical sound devices. Two recitation hours and one three 
hour laboratory period, second semester. No prerequisite. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 

21. LIGHT. 

An advanced course on Physical Optics embracing: optical instruments, 
spectra, interference phenomena, polarized light, nature of light, absorp- 
tion, and dispersion. Given in alternate years. Two recitation hours and 
one laboratory period of three hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Phy- 
sics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. (Ill) 

(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

22. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. 

An advanced course on Electrical and Magnetic theories and instru- 
ments, embracing: electron theory, electrolysis, thermo-electricity, elec- 
tromagnetics, and alternating currents. Given in alternate years. Two 
recitation hours and one laboratory period of three hours, second semester. 
Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. (HI) 
(Not given in 1937-1938.) 

23. HEAT. 

An advanced course on the theory of Heat, embracing: thermodynamics, 
molecular physics, quantum theory, and radiations. Given in alternate 
years. Two recitation hours and one laboratory period of three hours, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6, and 
Mathematics 1 and 2, or their equivalents. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

24. MECHANICS. 

An advanced course on theoretical Mechanics, embracing: wave mo- 
tions, gyroscopic actions, dynamics of fluids (including applications to 
aeronautics), and quantum mechanics. Given in alternate years. Two 
recitation hours and one laboratory period of three hours, second semes- 



130 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

ter. Elective. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6, and 
Mathematics 1 and 2. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 

25. MODERN PHYSICS. 

An advanced course tracing the development of Physics from the early- 
Greek philosophers to the modern quantum theory. Three recitation 
periods, first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

26. ELECTRONICS. 

A course mainly on the properties and practical applications of the 
electron, embracing: thermionics, photoelectricity, cathode rays, X-rays, 
and radioactivity. Two recitation hours and one laboratory period of 
three hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 
5 and 6. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. War- 
field. (IH) 

28. ELEMENTS OP RADIO COMMUNICATION. 

A course of lectures and laboratory work consisting of elementary con- 
siderations of the fundamental laws and their applications to the circuits 
of modern radio systems. Given in alternate years. One recitation hour 
and two laboratory periods of three hours each, second semester. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 1 and 2, or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 

31. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

A laboratory course which will allow students who have taken Physics 
11 and 12 to continue laboratory work. One laboratory period of three 
hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 11 and 12 and two other ad- 
vanced courses in Physics which have been completed or are being taken 
concurrently. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. War- 
field, Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

32. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

Similar to Physics 31. One laboratory period of three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield, 
Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

43 AND 44. X-RAY TECHNIQUE. 

A course in the theory of X-rays and practical experience by each stu- 
dent in the making of radiographs in all the more common positions, 
using hospital type equipment; the development of films and the in- 
struction in the care, use, and dangers of all types of X-ray equip- 
ment. One recitation hour and two laboratory periods of three hours 
each, throughout the year. Prerequisites, Biology 111 and 12 and Physics 
1 and 2 or 5 and 6. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00 
each semester. Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 



(Note: The student must purchase her own X-ray films.) 



Depaetment of Psychology 131 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Highsmith, Martin; Associate Professor Baekley; As- 
sistant Craig. 

11 AND 12. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

Designed to present the basic principles and methods of psychology as 
an experimental natural science. Two recitation hours and one three hour 
laboratory period a week for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Approval of instructor is necessary. Laboratory fee, $1.00 a semester. 
Mr. Barkley. (II) 

21. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The development of points of view, problems, and methods of psy- 
chology; the fundamental principles necessary for understanding the be- 
havior of human beings: the facts and principles of intelligent behavior, 
motivation, and personality. Three hours, each semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Highsmith, Mr. Martin, Mr. 
Barkley. (II) 

22. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The psychological facts and principles in learning, study, individual 
differences, and adjustment. Three hours, each semester. Prerequisite. 
Psychology 21 or its equivalent. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. High- 
smith, Mr. Martin, Mr. Barkley. (II) 

26. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of the intellectual and social development of the child from 
birth to adolescence, with special emphasis upon the early developmental 
period. Some of the subjects discussed: Factors influencing develop- 
ment, original nature and learning; the development of percepts, lan- 
guage, thought processes; play; moral development; personality; the 
problem child. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12 
or 21. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barkley. (Ill) 

32. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of the applications of psychology in industry, personnel work, 
advertising, selling, medicine, law, politics, and athletics. Special atten- 
tion is given to problems of vocational guidance and individual efficiency. 
Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, one course in Psychology. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barkley. (II) 

33. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course affords an opportunity for students in Psychology and Edu- 
cational Psychology to do intensive work on special experimental or 
statistical problems in these fields. Three hours, each semester. Consult 
instructor before registering for this course. Credit, three semester hours. 
Members of Staff. (Ill) 

34. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course is a continuation of Psychology 33. Three hours, each se- 
mester. Prerequisite, Psychology 33. Credit, three semester hours. Mem- 
bers of Staff. (Ill) 



132 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Carolina 

37. MENTAL MEASUREMENTS. 

A study of the current methods of measuring mental abilities. Practice 
in the administration and scoring of group and individual tests and in the 
statistical analysis and interpretation of test results. Three hours, each 
semester. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12, or 21. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Highsmith. (Ill) 

41. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY AND MENTAL HYGIENE. 

A study of abnormal mental phenomena in their relation to normal life, 
including such topics as sensation; perception; thought; sleep; dreams; 
hypnosis; disassociation; the psychoneuroses; personality disorders, espe- 
cially of childhood; the fundamental principles of mental hygiene. Three 
hours, first semester. Prerequisite, six hours in Grade II or their equiv- 
alent. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barkley. (Ill) 

42. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE. 

This course deals with developmental characteristics and problems of 
adolescence. Testing devices for studying developmental trends and be- 
havior problems will be stressed. Three hours, second semester. Prerequi- 
site, one course in Psychology. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. High- 
smith. (Ill) 

44. ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of instructor. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith, Mr. Martin, Mr. Barkley. 
(HI) 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professors Barney, Underwood, Hooke; Associate Professors Mil- 
ler, Laird, TTardre, LaRochelle; Assistant Professors Abbott, 
Cutting, Farinholt; Instructors Taylor, Funderburk:. 

FRENCH 

1 AND 2. BEGINNING COURSE. 

Texts: An elementary French grammar, a reader for beginners, and 
some easy French text. In this course, special emphasis is laid on the 
fundamental principles of French grammar. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Taylor. (I) 

3 AND 4. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

French 3 provides an intensive review of the fundamental principles of 
French grammar, together with the translation and discussion of modern 
texts. Regular work in composition is required also in French 4, but more 
time is devoted to reading. Supplementary reading includes at least one 
book on French life and customs and one modern literary work. 

Several sections of French 3-4 are made up of students who attained the 
necessary grade in the placement tests given at the beginning of the first 
semester. These special groups receive more drill in conversation and a 
more extensive program of supplementary reading. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Underwood, Mr. Hooke, Miss Taylor, 
Mrs. Funderburk. (I) 



Depabtment of Romance Languages 133 

7 AND 8. READINGS FROM LITERATURE. 

This course is based on the reading in chronological order of selections 
from French literature. Attention will be given to translation and reading 
for comprehension, with such verb or other drill as seems desirable. Sup- 
plementary reading will include a brief survey of French literary history. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Underwood and 
others. (II) 

9 AND 10. READING AND COMPOSITION. 

The emphasis in this course, which is a companion course to 7-8 above, 
is on language, with Modern French readings, composition and conversa- 
tion, verbs and idiom drill. Outside reading. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hooke and others. (II) 

11 AND 12. ELEMENTARY CONVERSATION. 

This course is intended as a Sophomore elective in French for those 
who desire to gain proficiency in conversation. Those who have completed 
French 9 and 10, or equivalent, but are not ready for French 51 and 52 
will also be admitted. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Hardre, Mr. Hooke. (II) 

19 AND 20. COMPOSITION. 

This one-hour course in composition may be combined with French 7-8 
above or taken separately by those who feel the need of practical exercise 
on grammatical principles. One hour for the year. €redit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Barney. (II) 

25. SURVEY COURSE. 

Lectures, translations in class, and reports from assigned readings on 
the general development of French literature from the beginning to 1600. 
This course will give the student a general basis for more specific work 
in literature. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Barney. (Ill) 

26. SURVEY OF MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE. 

A continuation of Course 25. This course covers in outline the last three 
centuries and forms a basis for more specific study. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 

27 AND 28. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE. 

The aim of this course is to give a comprehensive view of the literature 
of the period and of the conditions under which it was produced. Selected 
works from the following authors will be read: Corneille, Pascal, La 
Rochefoucauld, Mme. de SevignS, Moliere, Racine, La Bruyere, and La Fon- 
taine. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Laird. 
(Ill) 

29 AND 30. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE. 

This course is primarily a study of Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, 
Rousseau and others of the Enlightenment who prepared the way for 
modern democracy, liberty, and science. Full attention is given to drama, 
fiction, the Salons, the Quarrel of the Ancients and Moderns, Sentimental- 
ism, etc. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Under- 
wood. (Ill) 

(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 



134 The Woman's College of the University of Nobth Carolina 

31 AND 32. FRENCH ROMANTICISM. 

A study of the best known poetry, novels, and dramas of the first half 
of the nineteenth century. An effort is made to increase the students' 
critical ability and appreciation of poetry. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Miller. (Ill) 

35 AND 36. FRENCH LITERATURE SINCE 1850. 

A study of the better known writers and literary movements of the 
late nineteenth century, such as Balzac, Flaubert, Sainte-Beuve, Taine, 
Baudelaire, Verlaine, Anatole France; realism, naturalism, impression- 
ism, symbolism. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Mr. Underwood. (Ill) 

37 AND 38. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH DRAMA. 

A survey of French drama from the closing years of the nineteenth cen- 
tury to the present time. Class discussion and analysis of representative 
plays, and reports on supplementary reading. All plays are read in 
French editions, especially those of La Petite Illustration. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hooke. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

61 AND 52. ADVANCED CONVERSATION. 

This course is conducted wholly in French. Its aim is to give a more 
intimate knowledge of France as it is today, together with the ability to 
carry on an ordinary conversation in French. Three hours for the year. 
Prerequisites, French 9 and 10, or 11 and 12. Credit, six semester hours. 
Mr. Hardre. (Ill) 

53 AND 54. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a comprehensive review of 
French grammar and a thorough grounding in the principles of French 
composition. During the latter part of the second semester, special at- 
tention is given to the study of French letter-writing, both social and 
commercial. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Hardre. (Ill) 

61. PROFESSIONAL REVIEW OF GRAMMAR. 

Professional review of one or more grammars used in the high schools 
of the state. The main principles of grammar will be taken up with a 
view to organizing and extending previous knowledge. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 

62. PHONETICS. 

A course in both scientific and practical phonetics. Beginning with the 
description of correct position of the vocal organs for the reproduction of 
the sounds represented by the symbols of the International Phonetic As- 
sociation, the rules for the pronunciation of single words are learned and 
fixed by much practice in phonetic transcription. The students hear the 
sounds from records made by native French professors. This course should 
be taken by all those who expect to teach French. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 



Department of Romance Languages 135 

65 AND 66. FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH. 

This course is offered for the purpose of acquainting students not pre- 
pared to pursue the regular courses in French literature or not having 
time for extensive work, with the masterpieces of French literature and 
those works which have affected the thought of the world. One hour for 
the year. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

71 AND 72. CHOSES FRANQAISES. 

A general information course on France and the French people. There 
will he some consideration of geography and history as a necessary hack- 
ground, followed by a study of French national traits, home life, and 
institutions. This course is intended to give the student an inspirational 
background for the study of French similar to that obtained by travel, and 
to give the prospective teacher of that language a fund of information 
useful in her chosen profession. Three hours for the year. Credit, six se- 
mester hours. Miss Laird. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

101. THE EARLY FRENCH NOVEL. 

Reading, reports, discussion, and some class translation from the sources 
and beginning of the novel in France to 1800. Three hours for the first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

102. MODERN FRENCH NOVEL. 

Similar to Course 101 in method. Both courses should be elected by 
those who wish to acquire ability for extensive private reading. Three 
hours for the second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 
(Ill) 

(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

SPANISH 

1 AND 2. ELEMENTARY COURSE. 

Thorough drill is given in pronunciation, vocabulary building, and im- 
portant principles of grammar. This is designed to equip the student with 
a solid foundation for more advanced study of the Spanish language and 
literature. Texts: An Elementary Grammar; short stories on Spain, 
Mexico, and South America; a short and simple novel. Collateral Reading: 
Three hundred pages on the geography and history of the Spanish-speak- 
ing countries. Three hours for the year. Credit^ six semester hours. Miss 
LaRochelle, Miss Abbott, Miss Cutting. (I) 

3 AND 4. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

Review of grammar, reading with composition and conversation based 
on texts read. Texts: A Review Grammar; novels and dramas of the 
nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Collateral Reading: Three hundred 
pages on the Art, Music, Dance, and Customs of the Spanish people. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss LaRochelle, Miss 
Abbott, Miss Cutting. (I) 



136 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Carolina 

5 AND 6. THE SPANISH NOVEL OF THE NINETEETH CENTURY 
AND COMPOSITION. 

A study of the development of the novel from its early beginnings 
through the nineteenth century. Intensive study of the life and works of 
the nineteenth century novelists. Drill on conversation and composition. 
Texts: Novels of Fernan Caballero, Valera, Alarc6n, Pereda, Perez Gald6s, 
Pardo Bazan, Clarin, and Palacio Vald§s; a composition hook; a news- 
paper. Collateral Reading: History of Spanish Literature by Merim£e and 
Morley; Introduction to Spanish Literature by Northup; El Gonde de 
Lucanor; Amadis de Gaula; Celestina; Lazarillo de Tormes; Don Quix- 
ote, and two novels of the nineteenth century. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss LaRochelle. (II) 

11 AND 12. CONVERSATION. 

This course is intended as a junior or senior elective in Spanish for 
those who desire to gain proficiency in conversation. Systematic and in- 
tensive drills in oral practice and discussion of assigned topics. Free 
composition based on outside reading of newspapers and magazines. Use 
of phonograph records in preparation of various types of prose and poetry 
for the improvement of oral work and self expression. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Cutting. (II) 

21 AND 22. CONTEMPORARY SPANISH NOVEL AND COMPOSITION. 

A special study of the life and representative works of modern novelists. 
Continuation of drill on conversation and composition. Texts: Novels of 
Blasco Ibafiez, Baroja, Valle-Inclan, Ricardo Le6n, Concha Espina, and 
Azorin; a composition book; a newspaper. Collateral Reading. Four con- 
temporary novels. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss LaRochelle. (Ill) 

(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

23 AND 24. CONTEMPORARY SPANISH DRAMA AND COMPOSITION. 

History of the development of the drama from the thirteenth century 
to the present day. Intensive study of the life and works of contemporary 
dramatists. Free composition and oral reports on assigned topics. Texts: 
Dramas of Perez Gald6s, Benavente, Linares Rivas, Dicenta, Los Her- 
manos Quintero, Arniches, Marquina, and Martinez Sierra; a composition 
book; a newspaper. Collateral Reading: History of Spanish Literature by 
Merimee and Morley; Introduction to Spanish Literature by Northup; 
La Vida es Sueno, El Gran Galeoto, Don Juan Tenorio, and two con- 
temporary dramas. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss LaRochelle. (Ill) 

25 AND 26. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE. 

An introduction to the general field of Spanish Literature from its 
origins to the present time. Lectures, recitations, and reports in English. 
Collateral reading in English and Spanish. Two hours for the year. Credit f 
four semester hours. Miss Abbott. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1937-1938.) 

33. THE NOVEL OF THE GOLDEN AGE. 

A study of Cervantes' Don Quixote in part and some of his Novelas 
Ejemplares. Lectures, recitations, and collateral reading. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Abbott. (Ill) 



Department of Secretarial Science 137 

34. THE DRAMA OF THE GOLDEN AGE. 

A study of selected plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de 
Alarcdn, and Caldertfn de la Barca. Lectures, recitations, and collateral 
reading. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Abbott. (Ill) 

53 AND 54. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A comprehensive review of the principles of Spanish grammar, their 
practical application in the construction of sentences, paraphrasing from 
Spanish texts, and free composition. This course should be taken by 
those who intend to teach Spanish. Two hours for the year. Credit, -four 
semester hours. Miss Abbott. (Ill) 

ITALIAN 

1 AND 2. BEGINNING COURSE. 

Study of grammar supplemented with reading and conversation. The 
student will be taught to understand simple Italian, spoken or written, 
and to pronounce the language correctly. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Miller. (II) 

3 AND 4. 

This is a continuation of Course 1 and 2. After a further grounding 
in the principles of grammar, Dante's Inferno and selections from 
Petrarch, Boccaccio, and other authors will be read as time permits. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. (Ill) 



DEPARTMENT OF SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Kyker, Assistant Professor Spruill; Instructor Hum- 
phrey. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Administration is designed to give a broad foundation of culture on 
which is built specialized training to prepare those who desire to enter 
the field of secretarial work. The requirements in the freshman and 
sophomore years correspond to those of a liberal arts course. Certain 
basic courses in Economics which give a fundamental understanding of 
the structure, functions, and operation of our business and economic 
organization are required as a basis for the more specialized courses in 
Secretarial Science. In the Secretarial Science courses emphasis is 
placed on the understanding of principles as well as the acquiring of 
specialized business techniques and skills. 

For the requirements for graduation with a B.S. in Secretarial Admin- 
istration see page 64. 

21 AND 22. SECRETARIAL SCIENCE (PRINCIPLES). 

This course gives the necessary training to prepare one to perform 
the duties of a commercial stenographer, a private secretary, or a teacher 
of typewriting and shorthand. Business English, dictation, transcrip- 
tion, methods of handling correspondence, and the preparation of business 
reports and papers constitute the subject matter of this course. For Jun- 
iors. Credit, eight semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each semester. 
Miss Spruill, Mr. Humphrey. 



138 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

23. SECRETARIAL SCIENCE (ADVANCED). 

A continuation of Secretarial Science 21 and 22 and related secre- 
tarial practice, including office machines. Prerequisite, Secretarial Science 
21 and 22, or its equivalent. Credit, four semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00. Miss Spruill. 

24. OFFICE MANAGEMENT. 

This course offers advanced preparation for the teacher of typewriting, 
stenography, or office methods. It also trains for the positions of private 
secretary, head or supervising stenographer, and office manager. The 
subject matter of the course includes: the location of the office, office lay- 
out, office equipment and supplies, the routing and flow of office work, the 
handling of correspondence, the preparation of business reports and busi- 
ness papers for the different departments of a business, employment of 
personnel, standards of performance, and methods of paying office work- 
ers. A study of the office manuals of large offices and trips to modern 
business offices will be made. Readings, and the preparation of an office 
manual will be required of each student. Three hours, second semester. 
For Seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each 
semester. Miss Spruill. 

26. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE AND REPORTS. 

This course presents the handling of business correspondence and re- 
ports both as to the principle and as to practice. A study is made of 
order letters, acknowledgment letters, information letters, credit policies 
and credit letters, claim letters, the letters of reference and application, 
the collection series, the psychology of the sales letter, the sales letter, 
the sales series, and adjustment letters. Special attention is given to 
business reports, summaries, and forms of set-up for the business mate- 
rial. Practice in the application of principles is required. Three hours, 
second semester. Open to Seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Kyker. 

31. SECRETARIAL PRACTICE. 

An opportunity will be given to a limited number of advanced Secre- 
tarial Science students to secure actual experience in secretarial and 
office work by being assigned as assistants to do typing, mimeographing, 
indexing, filing, preparation of manuscripts, taking dictation, transcrib- 
ing, and the handling of routine correspondence. Three hours, either 
semester. Prerequisite, Secretarial Science 21 and 22. For seniors. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Kyker, Miss Spruill. 

35 AND 36. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING FOR BUSINESS TEACHERS. 

Accounting principles and systems applicable to different types of busi- 
nesses; accounting for partnerships and corporations and their reorgani- 
zation, liquidation, and consolidation; accounting for branch houses and 
affiliated corporations, cost accounting; special reserves, investments and 
the elements of actuarial science. Principles are applied by solving nu- 
merous accounting problems. Prerequisite, Economics 33 and 34 or the 
equivalent. Three hours for the year. For Seniors. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Kyker. 



Department of Secretarial Science 139 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES FOR BUSINESS TEACHERS 

59 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN SHORTHAND, TYPEWRITING, 
AND BOOKKEEPING. 

A study of the subject matter and methods of teaching typewriting, 
shorthand, bookkeeping, and other business subjects presented primarily 
from the vocational viewpoint. Occupational surveys and follow-up 
studies are considered as a basis for determining the need for vocational 
business curricula, and job analysis is considered as a method for deter- 
mining the curriculum content. 

(a) Typewriting: Methods of learning the keyboard, development of 
speed, correlation of shorthand with typewriting, equipment, diagnostic 
charts, remedial teaching, modern tests, grading, and standards. 

(b) Shorthand: Direct methods of teaching shorthand, supplementary 
aids, testing, provisions for individual differences, teaching transcription, 
job analysis of secretarial duties, the developing of traits, and the correla- 
tion of shorthand with typewriting and secretarial practice. 

(c) Bookkeeping: The need for vocational bookkeepers, the social 
values of bookkeeping, the journal, ledger, equation, the balance sheet 
approaches in bookkeeping, the place of the bookkeeping machine, the use 
of practice sets and business papers, tests and measurements. Three 
hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Secretarial Science 21 and 22, Eco- 
nomics 33 and 34 or their equivalent. Open to Seniors. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Kyker, Miss Spruill, Mr. Humphrey. 

61. SUPERVISED TEACHING OF BUSINESS SUBJECTS. 

In this course, the methods of teaching business subjects are applied to 
actual classroom teaching. Demonstration teaching, lesson planning, 
teaching under supervision, and conferences constitute the work of the 
course. Prerequisites, Education 59 and Economics 33-34 and Secretarial 
Science 21-22. Three semester hours. Mr. Kyker, Miss Spruill, Mr. Hum- 
phrey. 

*65. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

A study of the agencies and institutions for business education, their 
scope and functions. A critical study of the aims and objectives of busi- 
ness education. The various business curricula are evaluated in relation 
to modern educational philosophy, the trends in business education, and 
the findings of business education research. Tests, measurements, and 
standards in commercial subjects; trait development, job analysis, oc- 
cupational surveys and follow-up studies in business curriculum building, 
and the need for business education research will receive careful atten- 
tion. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Kyker. 

*19. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN THE SOCIAL BUSINESS SUB- 
JECTS. * 

A study of the appropriate subject matter and the effective methods 
of teaching social-business subjects: elementary economics, business law, 
business organization, general business, and other business subjects that 
have for their objective an understanding of organized business, business 
relations, and the various business problems met by the individual in 



* Business Education 65 and 79 alternate, both not being offered the same year. 



140 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

his personal, social, and civic activities. The place and the need for 
consumer education in the high school and tne construction of a social- 
business curriculum receive special attention. Open to Seniors. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Kyker. 

BUSINESS TEACHER-TRAINING CURRICULUM 

This curriculum, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Administration, offers preparation for the teaching and supervisory- 
positions in the field of secondary Business Education. The course is 
sufficiently comprehensive in its offering to meet the certification require- 
ment in North Carolina. With the proper selection of electives, it will 
be possible to meet the certification requirements of other states for 
specialized teachers of: (1) bookkeeping and accounting; (2) steno- 
graphic and secretarial subjects; (3) salesmanship and merchandising. 

The fundamental courses in general Education are designed to give an 
understanding of the relationship of Business Education to the problems 
and objectives of Secondary Education. 

The basic courses in Economics will give the business teacher the 
needed background for the more specialized courses. She should also gain 
an understanding of the structure, functions, and operation of our busi- 
ness and economic organization and the social-business problems confront- 
ing the business world. 

The specialized courses in Business Education deal with the problems, 
methods, curriculum construction, testing, supervision, administration, 
and research peculiar to the field of business education. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
First Semester Second Semester 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

History 3 4 History 4 4 

Science or Mathematics 3 Science or Mathematics 3 

Foreign Language* 3 Foreign Language* 3 

Hygiene 1 2 Hygiene 2 2 

~15 15 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 11 3 English 12 3 

Psychology 21 3 Psychology 22 3 

Principles of Economics 11 3 Principles of Economics 12 3 

Biology 37 or History 12 3 History 12 or Biology 37 3 

Foreign Language* or Elective.. 3 Foreign Language* or Elective.. 3 

15 15 

The State Department of Public Instruction requires a minimum of 15 
semester hours of Education and 36 semester hours of Business. Principles 
of Economics and Economic Geography (9 semester hours) are taken in 



* A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must con- 
tinue a foreign language offered at entrance. 



Department of Sociology 141 

the Sophomore year. The remaining 27 semester hours of Business and 
the 15 semester hours of Education are taken in the junior and senior 
years. 

Required courses in Education: 

Education 69, (Technique of Teaching) 3 

or 
Education 46, (High School Problems) 

Education 59 (Materials and Methods in Business Subjects) 3 

Education 61, (Observation and Directed Teaching of 

Business Subjects ) 3 

Electives in Education 6 

15 

To meet the requirements for certification in North Carolina, the fol- 
lowing courses must be taken: 

Secretarial Science 21-22, 23, 12 

Secretarial Science 24 (Office Management) 3 

Economics 33-34 (Principles of Accounting) 6 

The remaining 6 hours of Business and 18 hours of unrestricted elec- 
tives will be chosen in consultation with the adviser in charge of the 
business teacher training course, so as to meet best the needs of each pros- 
pective teacher. 

GRADUATE WORK IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

A graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Science is 
offered by the College. The primary purpose of this program is to 
prepare master teachers and supervisors of business courses, heads of 
business departments in secondary schools, and teachers of profes- 
sional business education courses in teachers' colleges. 

Professional courses in business education and subject-matter 
courses in business and secretarial science open to advanced under- 
graduates and graduates will be offered during the summer sessions. 

For information concerning the courses offered, prerequisites for 
admission, and the requirements for the degree, write for special 
bulletin on Graduate Work in Business Education. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Johnson; Assistant Professor Shivers; Instructor Proc- 
tor. 

11 AND 12. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. 

A general survey of introductory Sociology with considerable emphasis 
on social change, current social problems and social control. Three hours 
-for the year. Elective for Sophomores. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Johnson. (II) 



142 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

21. PRINCIPLES OP SOCIOLOGY. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the science of 
society. The course will consider the origin, nature, and development of 
social organization as conditioned by physical, psychological, and cultural 
factors; the social institutions, such as property, the family, the church, 
and the state; and the inter-relation between human nature and culture. 
Modern social problems will be examined in relation to theories of social 
progress. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Johnson, Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

22. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 

This course deals with various current social problems and social mal- 
adjustments. It is concerned with such processes as dependency, defici- 
ency, degeneration, unrest, demoralization, disorganization, and revolu- 
tion. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Johnson, Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

23. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of individual and collective behavior in relation to the various 
social and cultural influences or stimuli. This course deals with group be- 
havior conditioned by original human nature, the cultural environment, 
and differences in class interests. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 

24. RURAL SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 

The social problems which are peculiar to rural life, such as rural edu- 
cation, rural recreation, the rural home, the rural church, will be studied. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. John- 
son. (Ill) 

26. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION. 

The approach to the study of the community is made by considering 
human nature and the development of personality. This is followed by 
a study of the processes involved in the economic, ecological, and cultural 
organization of the community. Three hours, second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Sociology 11-12 or 21, or in the case of Seniors, the consent of 
the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

27. INTER-RACIAL RELATIONS. 

After a brief account of the cultural and historical background of the 
Negro in Africa, this course will consider the problems of amalgamation, 
assimilation, population, racial mental equipment, and migration. With 
this introduction there will follow an analysis of the present political, 
social, cultural, and economic status of the Negro in the United States, 
and a consideration of such problems as education, health, sanitation, 
and desirable inter-racial relationships. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 

28. ANTHROPOLOGY. 

In this course will be discussed the earliest appearance of man, the pre- 
historic history of Europe, the types of mankind, universal human traits, 
culture, the diffusion of culture. The aims of this course are to give a 
perspective of the general history of mankind and an analysis of repre- 
sentative cultures of primitive and civilized societies for the purpose of 



The School of Music 143 

recognizing the universal human traits reflected in property ownership, 
marriage, etc. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 

33. THE FAMILY. 

An historical introduction to the problems of the family is followed by 
a consideration of such materials as the natural and institutional family, 
the modern family, the home and the family, the family and the com- 
munity, methods of studying the family, and the mechanism and processes 
of inter-action taking place in the family. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

36. CRIMINOLOGY. 

This course will consider theories of criminology and punishment. It 
will analyze case studies of delinquents; compare and criticize programs 
for the social treatment of the criminal. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

38. SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. 

A seminar in contemporary sociological theories. Three hours, second 

semester. For majors and minors in Sociology. Required for majors. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

39. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. 

The aim of this course is to introduce the student to the various fields 
of social work. Family case work, group work, and medical social work 
will be included in the survey. Three hours, first semester. For majors 
in Sociology, and others with permission of the head of the department. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Proctor. (Ill) 

40. SOCIAL CASE WORK. 

A review of the fundamental elements of case work technique; diag- 
nosis; investigation; case planning; case recording. Given in connection 
with actual case experience. Three hours, second semester. For majors 
in Sociology and other especially qualified students. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Proctor. (Ill) 



SPANISH 

See Department of Romance Languages 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

II. Hugh Altvater, A.B., Mus.M., Dean 

COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 
COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

The School of Music offers regular courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Music, with major in piano, organ, violin, 
voice, public school music, or orchestral instruments. Students who 



144 



The Woman's College of the University of Nokth Carolina 



wish to pursue music without the specialization which is necessary 
for this degree may elect music as a major in the Bachelor of Arts 
course. 

All students majoring in music are required to be members of the 
College Choir or Orchestra unless excused by the Dean of the School 
of Music. 

The fees for lessons in Applied Music (piano, organ, violin, and 
voice) are given under the head of "Expenses." (Consult the Index.) 

CURRICULUM IN MUSIC 



Leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Music with the major 
in pianot, organ*, or violinj. 



freshman 



SEM. 
HBS. 



Music 1-2, Harmony 6 

Music 3-4, Sight Singing and 

Ear Training 4 

Applied Music 1-2 6 

English 1-2 6 

Modern Language 6 

Hygiene 1-2 4 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Music 21-22, Counterpoint 4 

Applied Music 21-22 8 

Music 15-16, Sight Singing 

and Ear Training 2 

Psychology 21 3 

Music 71-72, Form and 

Analysis 4 

Music Elective 6 

College Elective 3 



32 



30 



SOPHOMORE 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Music 11-12, Harmony 6 

Music 19-20, History of Music 6 

Applied Music 11-12 6 

English 11-12 6 

Modern Language 6 



30 



SENIOR 



HRS. 



Music 31-32, Composition 4 

Applied Music 31-32 8 

Music 73, 74, Instrumentation .... 2 

Music Elective 13 

College Elective 3 



30 



Note — If a student pursuing the above courses plans to teach her major subject in the 
public schools, the following courses must be taken as electives : 

Teaching Methods in major subject 6 

Practice Teaching - 6 

Psychology 22 3 

Education 69 3 



t Students majoring in piano who are deficient in sight-reading must pursue a regular 
non-credit course in this field until the faculty passes favorably upon their sight-reading 
ability. Piano majors are required to participate in ensemble group rehearsals at the re- 
quest of their teacher. 

* Students majoring in organ must elect Music 37-38. 

% Violin majors are required to play in ensemble groups at the request of their teacher. 



The School of Music 



145 



The course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science with a major 
in voice is as follows: 

SEM. SEM. 

FRESHMAN HKS. JUNIOR HRS. 



Music 1-2, Harmony 6 

Music 3-4, Sight Singing and 

Ear Training 4 

Voice 1-2 4 

Piano -.. 2 

English 1-2 6 

Italian 6 

Hygiene 1-2 4 



Music 15-16, Sight Singing and 

Ear Training 2 

Voice 21-22 6 

Psychology 21 3 

German 6 

Music Elective 10 

College Elective 3 



SOPHOMORE 

Music 11-12, Harmony 6 

Music 19-20, History of Music 6 

Voice 11-12 4 

Piano — 2 

English 11-12 6 

French 6 



32 

SEM. 

HRS. SENIOR 



30 

SEM. 



Music 47-48, Sight Singing and 

Ear Training 2 

Music 71-72, Form and Analysis 4 

Voice 31-32 6 

Music 29-30, Conducting 2 

Music Elective 13 

College Elective 3 



30 



30 



See footnote to previous curriculum for list of courses needed for State 
certification of graduates from voice course. 

A candidate for the degree in voice must demonstrate her ability to 
play piano accompaniments of average difficulty before the completion of 
her course. 



CURRICULA IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music. 



GENERAL COURSE 



SEM. 



FRESHMAN HRS. 

Music 1-2, Harmony 6 

Music 3-4, S. S. and Ear Training 4 

Piano 1-2 6 

English 1-2 6 

Modern Language 6 

Hygiene 1-2 „ 4 



INSTRUMENTAL SUPERVISION 
COURSE 

SEM. 

FRESHMAN 



Music 1-2, Harmony 6 

Music 3-4, S. S. and Ear 

Training 4 

Major Orchestral Instrument 4 

Piano 2 

English 1-2 6 

Modern Language 6 

Hygiene 1-2 4 



32 



32 



146 The Woman's College of the University of Nobth Carolina 



SEM. 
SOPHOMORE HBS. 

Music 11-12, Harmony 6 

Music 13-14, History of Music 4 

Music 15-16, S. S. and Ear 

Training „ 2 

Piano 17-18 6 

English 11-12 6 

Modern Language — 6 



SEM. 
SOPHOMORE HBS. 

Music 11-12, Harmony 6 

Music 13-14, History of Music...... 4 

Music 15-16, S. S. and Ear 

Training 2 

Major Orchestral Instrument — 4 

Piano - 2 

English 11-12 6 

Modern Language 6 



30 



30 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HBS. 

Music 43-44, Public School 

Music Methods ~ ~ 4 

Music 47-48, S. S. and Ear 

Training 2 

Music 49-50, Orchestral In- 
strument Class 4 

Voice 23-24 4 

Vocal Technic 23-24 „ 2 

Psychology 21-22 6 

Music 21-22, Counterpoint 4 

Music 71-72, Form and 

Analysis 4 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Music 47-48, S.S. and Ear 

Training 2 

Music 43-44, Public School 

Music Methods ~ 4 

Major Orchestral Instrument 4 

Music 49-50, Orchestral Instru- 
ment Class 4 

Psychology 21-22 - 6 

Music 21-22, Counterpoint 4 

Music 71-72, Form and Analysis 4 

Minor Orchestral Instrument 

(Brass) 2 



30 



30 



SEM. 
SENIOR HRS. 

Music 35-36, Music Appreciation, 
Methods, Selection of Ma- 
terials 4 

Music 45-46, High School Music 

Methods 4 

Voice 37-38 4 

Music 63-64, Supervised Teaching 6 

Vocal Technic 39-40 2 

Education 69 3 

Violin 3 

Music 73-74, Instrumentation 2 

Music 29-30, Conducting 2 



SENIOR HBS. 

Music 35-36, Music Appreciation 

Methods-Selection of Materials 4 

Major Orchestral Instrument 4 

Music 45-46, High School 

Music Methods 4 

Music 63-64, Supervised Teaching 6 

Education 69 3 

Music 73-74, Instrumentation 2 

Music 29-30, Conducting 2 

Minor Orchestral Instrument 

(Woodwind) 2 

Minor Orchestral Instrument 

(String) S 



30 



30 



The School of Musio 147 

CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHEIiOR OP ARTS WITH A MAJOR 

IN MUSIC 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, with the major in piano, 
organ, voice, or violin. One hundred and twenty semester hours required 
for graduation. 



SEM. 

FRESHMAN HB8. SOPHOMORE HRS. 

Music 5-6 4 Music 17-18 — 4 

Applied Music, Music 13-14 ~ 4 

Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ.. 4 Applied Music, 

English 1-2 6 Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ.. 4 

Social Science 3-4 8 English 11-12 - 6 

Foreign Language 6 Foreign Language 6 

Hygiene 1-2 4 Social Science - 4 

Elective - 2 

*32 30 

SEM. SEM. 

JUNIOR HRS. SENIOR HRS. 

Music 11-12 6 Music 21-22 6 

Applied Music, Applied Music, 

Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ.. 4 Piano, Voice, Violin, or Organ.. 4 

Science or Mathematics - 6 Science or Mathematics — 6 

Electives 14 Electives 14 

30 30 



♦Note. — In view of the fact that 32 semester hours are required in the Freshman year, 
two semester hours of electives may be omitted from one of the later years, if the 
student desires. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The list of requirements in applied music as given below must not 
be misunderstood to be a complete statement of work needed to satisfy 
credit standards. The compositions mentioned are to be interpreted 
merely as symbols of stages of advancement. A jury of faculty mem- 
bers will decide upon each student's qualifications for entrance or ad- 
vancement. 

PIANO COURSE. 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales and arpeggii at mod- 
erate tempi; Etudes such as Czerny op. 299; Heller op. 47; Little Preludes 
and Fugues, Bach; Easier Two-part Inventions, Bach; compositions by 
standard composers equivalent in difficulty to Mozart, Sonata in C major, 
No. 3; Haydn, Sonata G major, No. 11; Beethoven Sonata op. 49, No. 2. 

Freshman Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 108. Major and minor, 
dominant seventh and diminished seventh arpeggii M. M. 72; Trill one, 
two, four, and eight notes M. M. 60; Legato and staccato octaves at mod- 
erate speed. Czerny, op. 299 and Cramer; Bach Two-part Inventions; 
Early sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven; compositions of equal diffi- 
culty from Romantic and Modern schools. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. 



148 The Woman's College of the University of Noeth Carolina 

Sophomore Year: Technical work continued; scales M. M. 132. Cramer; 
Czerny op. 740; Bach Three-part Inventions; Easier dance movements 
from French Suites; Beethoven Sonatas op. 14. No. 1; op. 14, No. 2; 
Romantic and Modern compositions. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. 

Junior Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 144. Scales in thirds, sixths, 
tenths, M. M. 132; other technical work continued. Czerny, op. 740; 
Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; French and English Suites; easier Pre- 
ludes and Fugues from W. T. C, Bach; More difficult Beethoven Sonatas; 
Compositions by Schumann, Schubert, Chopin, Rubinstein, Liszt, Mac- 
Dowell, Debussy and others. Four hours for the year. Credit, eight se- 
mester hours. 

Senior Year: Technical work continued; Bach, Preludes and Fugues 
from W. T. C; Chopin, Etudes; a wide repertoire embracing a sonata, 
concerto, and pieces by Classic, Romantic, and Modern composers. Com- 
plete public recital. Four hours for the year. Credit, eight semester hours. 

VOICE COURSE. 

Because of the highly individual character of the voice, it is not pos- 
sible to indicate stages of development so accurately as in the case of in- 
struments. Entrance examinations will have to do with ability to sing 
on pitch, capacity to phrase simpler songs, general musical intelligence, 
and reading ability. 

Freshman Year: Voice classification, tone production exercises, diction 
study. Songs from Volumes 1 and 11 of Italian Anthology "Songs of the 
17th Century." Old English classics. Two hours for the year. Credit, 
four semester hours. 

Sophomore Year: Technical study continued. Songs by Schubert, 
Brahms, and continuation of study from Italian Anthology. Arias from 
standard oratorios. French songs by Faure, Widor, Vidal, etc. Two hours 
for the year. Credit, four semester hours. 

Junior Year: Continued study of German, English, French, Italian 
Songs. English list should include works by Chadwick, Scott, Beach, or 
their artistic equivalent. At least two French or Italian Arias should be 
included. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 

Senior Year: Continuation of previous year's study on more advanced 
basis. Complete public recital. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. 

VIOLIN COURSE. 

Entrance requirements — The student should be able to pursue to her 
advantage the study of the 42 Etudes of Kreutzer. A previous thorough 
study of the Kayser op. 20, the Mazas Special Studies and the Dont Exer- 
cises Preparatory to Kreutzer is recommended. 

Freshman Year: Careful review of previous technical study. Sevcik 
trill studies. Kreutzer Etudes. Three octave scales and arpeggios. Con- 
certos of Bach, Viotti. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. 

Sophomore Year: Fiorillo Etudes. Double stop studies. Concertos, 
Spohr, No. 2; Viotti, No. 22. Three hours for the year. Credit, six se- 
mester hours. 



The School of Music 149 

Junior Yeae: Rode Caprices. Concertos, Bach, Mendelssohn; Sonatas, 
Tartini and Corelli. Four hours for the year. Credit, eight semester 
hours. 

Senior Year: Studies by Gavinies and Schradieck. Bach solo sonatas. 
Selected great concertos and sonatas. Smaller modern works. Complete 
public recital. Viola study required. Four hours for the year. Credit, 
eight semester hours. 

ORGAN COURSE. 

Second Year: The foundations of organ technic are laid by the study 
of simple exercises in legato, pedal, and manual playing by Stainer, fol- 
lowed by the Caspar Koch Pedal Scales, the completion of at least four of 
the "Little Eight Preludes and Fugues" by Bach, easy preludes and offer- 
tories, and intensive study of the art of hymn playing. 

Third Year: Completion of the "Little Eight Preludes and Fugues" 
by Bach, and at least two of the more difficult preludes and Fugues, such 
as the Cathedral Prelude and Fugue in E minor, and the short G minor 
Fugue, one of the easier sonatas by Mendelssohn or Guilmant, standard 
pieces of the German and French school. "Studies in Pedal Phrasing" 
by Dudley Buck. Choir accompaniments. Keyboard modulation and 
transposition. 

Fourth Year: Larger preludes and Fugues by Bach, sonatas and com- 
positions by Widor, Vierne, Bonnet, Karg-Elert, and others of the mod- 
ern school. Oratorio accompaniments. Complete public recital. 

COURSE IN MUSIC EDUCATION. 

To major in Music Education the student must have completed the work 
of the freshman year in the School of Music, including freshman piano; 
must have an acceptable singing voice; a high degree of skill in sight- 
singing and ear-training; and a personality that shows promise of suc- 
cessful teaching ability. 

RECITAL ATTENDANCE 

Students pursuing regular courses in the School of Music are re- 
quired to attend all faculty and student recitals and the performances 
of the College Concert Course. 

CARNEGIE MUSIC LIBRARY 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York City in 1935 awarded to 
Woman's College a "College Music Set" consisting of a library of 
826 records, 250 music scores, 125 works on music history, apprecia- 
tion, biography and reference books, and a Capehart reproducing 
machine. This award is valued at $2,750. 

Two rooms in the Music Building have been set aside as a library 
to house this valuable collection. A librarian is in charge, and the 
library is kept open daily, not only for the students of the music 
history and appreciation classes, but for the use of all students and 
members of the college community who may wish to acquaint them- 
selves with the music of the great masters. 



150 The Woman's College op the University of Nobth Carolina 

STUDENTS' RECITALS 

Students' recitals are given weekly, at which time works studied in 
the classroom are performed before the students of the Music Depart- 
ment. All students majoring in music are required to attend these 
recitals and to take part in them when requested to do so. These 
semi-public appearances are of great assistance in enabling the stu- 
dent to acquire that ease and self-possession so essential to a success- 
ful public performance. 

ARTISTS' RECITALS AND CONCERTS 

!Not less important than classroom instruction is the opportunity 
of hearing good music rendered by artists of superior ability. To 
afford students this opportunity a regular series of recitals and con- 
certs is given annually, the best artists available being secured. 

The artists appearing in the series of 1936-1937 are listed on 
page 38. 

Kecitals and concerts are given frequently during the school year 
by members of the Music Faculty. 

COLLEGE VESTED CHOHl 

The College Vested Choir is composed of one hundred and twenty- 
five college students who rehearse twice weekly and sing in chapel 
once each week. In addition, the choir studies one or more of the 
great choral works, which with the assistance of soloists, is presented 
in public performance. The choir sings for the University Sermons 
and other important college events. 

THE ORCHESTRA 

Membership in the college orchestra is open to all students who 
play an orchestral instrument sufficiently well to meet the require- 
ments of the director. Two rehearsals are held each week through- 
out the college year, and attendance is required of students who are 
studying an orchestral instrument. Public concerts are given during 
the college year as often as circumstances warrant. 

The orchestra is under the direction of Dean Altvater. One se- 
mester hour's credit is granted for two semesters' work in the or- 
chestra. 



The School of Music 151 

THE BAND 

During the school year 1936-37 plans were laid for the formation 
of a band. The necessary equipment was purchased and the proper 
classes were established. It is expected that in a short time an im- 
pressive group, suitable for parade and concert purposes, will be a 
regular part of the college life. Students who look forward to mem- 
bership and who own band instruments are requested to bring them 
for their own use. Numerous instruments are available at the col- 
lege for those students who have not found it possible to purchase 
their own. 

MADRIGAL CLUB 

The Madrigal Club is an organization of the Music Education 
Department. All Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors majoring in 
Public School Music, and the teachers in this department make up 
its membership. Juniors and Seniors who have Public School Music 
for their minor subject may be elected to associate membership in the 
club. At weekly meetings and rehearsals music suitable for women's 
voices is studied. Programs are prepared and given for special 
occasions. Student officers administer the affairs of the club, while 
the singing is directed by Associate Professor More. 

ANNUAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC CONTEST 

One of the major activities sponsored by the School of Music for 
the improvement of music in the State is the annual North Carolina 
Music Contest for High Schools. District elimination contests for 
the town and consolidated high schools are held in sixteen centers in 
the State, and the winners in these district contests, with the enroll- 
ments from the large city schools having an attendance of more than 
600 students, enter the annual State contest held at the College in 
April of each year. The attendance at the seventeenth annual contest, 
held in April, 1936, was 3,697 students from 133 different schools. 
One hundred and sixty-two schools participated in the state and 
district contests. These annual performances have given the music 
teachers, supervisors, and students a splendid opportunity to com- 
pare their work with that done in the other schools. The contest has 
in this way made a real contribution to the rapid development of 
music in the schools of the State. 



THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Assistant Professor Joyce, Director-, Instructors Maeley, 
Haeeell, Bendix. 

Applicants for admission to the Commercial Department must 
meet the regular college entrance requirements. 

In addition to completing the courses listed below, which provide 
a minimum of 31 credit hours, students enrolled in the one-year Com- 
mercial Course must meet the special requirements of the Depart- 
ment. 

Credit Hours 

Typewriting 1, 2 6 

Shorthand or Stenotypy 1, 2 12 

Accounting 3 

Business Correspondence 3 

Office Training 4 

Hygiene 2 

Physical Education 1 

Special Requirements for Certificate 

Before being issued a certificate by the College, the department re- 
quires that students be able to take dictation at the rate of one hun- 
dred words a minute and to type accurately at a minimum rate of 
fifty words a minute. 

1. SHORTHAND. 

This course includes the direct application and theory of Gregg Short- 
hand as presented through word building, phrasing, and letter writing. 
Emphasis is placed on the proper arm, hand, and finger movements 
essential to the development of rapid, fluent writing, and on transcription 
of sentences, simple business letters, and articles. Six credit hours. Mr. 
Joyce, Mrs. Marley, Miss Harrell, Miss Bendix. 

2. SHORTHAND. 

Review of theory, including principles of word building, brief forms, 
abbreviations, and phrasing; dictation and transcription of business let- 
ters and material taken from editorials and court testimonials. Emphasis 
is placed not only on the development of speed and accuracy in taking 
dictation and in transcribing notes, but also on the effective arrangement 
of different types of written business communication and materials taken 
from print. Six credit hours. Mr. Joyce, Mrs. Marley, Miss Harrell, Miss 
Bendix. 

4. STENOTYPY. 

Stenotypy is the machine shorthand, a system of simplified spelling 
written in plain alphabet type on the Stenotype. This machine is in use 
today in business organizations, in civil service, in law offices, in court 
recording, and in convention reporting. Machines for practice are fur- 
nished the students throughout the school year. 

From six to eight weeks are given to a mastery of the keyboard, a 
knowledge of stenotype letter combinations and abbreviations, and the 



The Commercial Depaetment 153 

ability to read stenotype notes. Speed development is then begun, with 
emphasis placed on vocabulary building. The student begins transcrip- 
tion from perfect notes and from dictated matter. Six credit hours. Miss 
Bendix. 

5. STENOTYPY. 

The second semester is devoted to the development of speed, both on 
the machine and in transcribing. The student is taught pencil stenotypy, 
which is a form of speed writing that can be used for simple dictation. 
Six credit hours. Miss Bendix. 

8. TYPEWRITING. 

In this course students study the use and care of the typewriter. Exer- 
cises are given for the developing of proper rhythm, touch, and reach, 
and the writing from various kinds of copy. Emphasis is placed on 
rhythm, accuracy, and the development of speed. Problems in arrange- 
ment of special material are given. Three credit hours. Mr. Joyce. 

9. TYPEWRITING. 

Instruction in the form and arrangement of letters, articles, statistical 
tabulations, special emphasis being placed upon effective proportion in 
arranging different types of material and in copying from rough drafts. 
Timed tests are given for accuracy and speed, as well as direct dictation 
at the machine. Three credit hours. Mr. Joyce. 

11. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE. 

This course includes a study of the writing of letters and other forms 
of business correspondence. The course stresses the application of stand- 
ard English to the needs of business. Practice is given in writing credit, 
collection, sales, adjustment, and application letters. A study is made 
of the various types of business reports, with special emphasis on se- 
curing and outlining material. Three credit hours. Miss Harrell, Miss 
Bendix. 

12. OFFICE TRAINING. 

This course includes lectures and reading assignments on subjects re- 
lating to business ethics and etiquette. Laboratory projects include prac- 
tice in operating adding machines, comptometers, ediphones, billing ma- 
chines, and duplicating machines. Practice is given in filing, indexing, 
proof reading, and stencil writing and in the preparation of business pa- 
pers and itineraries. Special care is taken to develop the occupational 
intelligence of the student. Four credit hours. Mrs. Marley. 

14, ACCOUNTING. 

This course is intended to provide the stenographic student with rea- 
sonable knowledge of accounting principles necessary for her to under- 
stand intelligently and to execute the duties common to all office workers. 
It covers the basic principles of accounting theory and the development 
of accounts, the presentation and interpretation of financial statements, 
as well as the duties of the bookkeeper at the close of the fiscal period. 
Three credit hours. Mr. Joyce. 



154 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The Department maintains constant contact with the leading com- 
mercial and industrial institutions of the State and cooperates with 
the College Placement Bureau in securing positions for those students 
successfully completing the course. 

LABORATORY FEE 

A typewriting laboratory fee of $2.00 each semester is required of 
every student in the Commercial Department. 



Degrees Conferred at the Forty-fourth Annual 

Commencement of the College 

June 1, 1936 



BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Mabel Cooper Adams *f Lenoir, Caldwell 

Mary Lee Alford Zebulon, R. F. D., Franklin 

Sarah Rawlings Ambrose Jacksonville, Onslow 

Sara Louise Andrewes Brevard, Transylvania 

Carmen Gattis Austin Four Oaks, Johnston 

Ida Hassell Bailey „ Raleigh, R. 1, Wake 

Elizabeth McDaniel Barineau Lincolnton, R. 3, Lincoln 

Ruth Wagg Barker Asheville, Buncombe 

Louise Davis Bell „ Mooresville, Iredell 

Faith Bissell Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Mary Elizabeth Bitting Durham, Durham 

Neta Lenore Blackwelder Wadesboro, Anson 

Kent Blair Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Amelia Frances Block Greensboro, Guilford 

Lillie Mae Bost New London, Stanly 

Doris Elinor Box Palisades Park, N. J. 

Frances May Boyette Scotland Neck, Halifax 

Dorothy Virginia Boyles King, Stokes 

Sarah Priscilla Boyles Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Reynolds Bradshaw Rock Ridge, Wilson 

Julia Estelle Brown Greenville, Pitt 

Sarah Elizabeth Biihmann Greensboro, Guilford 

Mildred Sue Bullock.™ „ Oxford, Granville 

Nan Kelly Burgin* , Asheville, Bunco mbe 

Martha Jane Burnside . Greensboro, Guilford 

Frances Penn Burton Stuart, Va. 

Lucile Bryan Byrd Elizabethtown, Bladen 

Edna Mae Cameron Selma, Johnston 

Willie Flata Carter T Marion, McDowell 

Evelyn French Cavileer Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Winifred Sharon Collett Wilmington, New Hanover 

Louise Cox Raleigh, Wake 

Eliza Faison Cromartie Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Mary June Darden Murfreesboro, Hertford 

Mary Elizabeth Davis Concord, Cabarrus 

Sarah Elizabeth Dowdle Franklin, Macon 

Gladys Leonard Draper ~ Greensboro, Guilford 

Alice Dunlap - Albemarle, Stanly 

Rachel Lee Dunnagan Yadkinville, Yadkin 

Amelia Miles Elliott Edenton, Chowan 

Mabel Clara Farmer Marshall, Madison 

Margaret Kathryn Farrior Wallace, R. F. D., Pender 

Helen Taylor Floyd _ Lumberton, Robeson 

Frances Katherine Foust _ Greensboro, Guilford 



* Absent by permission, 
t Dated July 24, 1935. 



156 Th e Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Joyce Frances Fulcher Washington, Beaufort 

Laura Mae Gamble Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Mausleat Garrard _ Durham, Durham 

Mary Agnes Garrett Greensboro, Guilford 

Genevieve Whittington Garrou* Valdese, Burke 

Louise George Alderson,, W. Va. 

Naomi Lee Gibson Laurinburg, Scotland 

Kathryn Selma Ginsberg Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Priscilla Glenn Gastonia, Gaston 

Robbie Thelma Goforth* Columbia, S. C. 

Louise Goodman Concord, Cabarrus 

Florence Vida Greis Ocean City, N. J. 

Betty Brown Griesinger Cleveland Heights, O. 

Mary Olive Hackney Lucama, Wilson 

Blanche Newsome Hardy*. Coral Gables, Fla. 

Jennie Wayles Harrison Greensboro, Guilford 

Lillian Hartness Mooresville, Iredell 

Frances Lucille Highsmith Durham, Durham 

Mary Carolyn Hines Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Lucille Hinton Greensboro, Guilford 

Rosabelle Hinton „ Selma, Johnston 

Sophie Martin Hinton* Elizabeth City, R. 3, Pasquotank 

Martha Doralyne Hodgin Greensboro, Guilford 

Minnie Elmira Hohn Randleman, Randolph 

Lela Hooker „ Durham, Durham 

Frances Jarvis Humphreys Danbury, Stokes 

Bess Florence Idol*f Kernersville, R. 1, Forsyth 

Miriam James*f Mt. Pleasant, Cabarrus 

Gertrude Coxe Jones Candler, R. 2, Buncombe 

Helen Marie Jones High Point, Guilford 

Ruby Jane Keller Oxford, Granville 

Mary Wall Kendrick Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Martha Elizabeth Kiser Hickory, Catawba 

Margaret Eloise Knight Greensboro, Guilford 

Sally Alice Knott Oxford, Granville 

Edith Celestia Lambeth Brown Summit, Guilford 

Elizabeth Landing Norfolk, Va. 

Mattie Cordula Lanier Hickory, R. 1, Catawba 

Edythe Virginia Latham Greensboro, Guilford 

Jessie Belle Lewis Enfield, R. 2, Halifax 

Ruth Allen Lilly Albemarle, Stanly 

Margaret Louise Liverman Columbia, Tyrrell 

Ollie Merivel McDonald Pinehurst, Moore 

Christiana McFadyen Raeford, R. 1, Hoke 

Harriet Zelota McGlohon Ayden, Pitt 

Lyn Nell McLennan Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Frances McNeill North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Mary Ruth McNeill Lumberton, Robeson 

Katherine Lelia Maddox Greensboro, Guilford 

Eva Mangum Morganton, R. 1, Burke 

Drusilla Louise Martin Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Lucille Massey Holly Springs, Wake 

Margaret Gibson Messer Bryson City, Swain 

* Absent by permission, 
t Dated July 24, 1935. 






Commencement 157 

Julia Herring Miller Wilson, Wilson 

Mary Ceward Money*t Madison, Rockingham 

Mary Lea Motsinger Guilford College, Guilford 

Mary Louise Myrick Greensboro, Guilford 

Margaret Estelle Neister Spencer, Rowan 

Eleanor Drake Nunn New Bern, Craven 

Martha Ann Ogburn Greensboro, Guilford 

Helen Virginia Page Cleveland, R. 2, Iredell 

Marie Love Palmer Franklin, Macon 

Caroline Parker Raeford, Hoke 

Sarah Eugenia Parker Winton, Hertford 

LaRue Frances Parrish Durham, R. 3, Durham 

Virginia Louise Pendleton Gate City, Va. 

Mildred Ophelia Penland Bryson City, Swain 

Nina Merle Penton Salem, N. J. 

Josephine Ellis Perry Louisburg, Franklin 

Mary Maurine Perryman Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Margaret Elizabeth Phillips*f Matthews, Mecklenburg 

Lewellyn Pinner Peak, S. C. 

Lorena Elizabeth Polston Henderson, Vance 

Dorothy Lois Poole Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Adelaide Porter Black Mountain, Buncombe 

Mary Catharine Proctor Lumberton, Robeson 

Elizabeth Harriet Rankin Hickory, Catawba 

Lyal Maie Reynolds Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Worsley Rives Graham, Alamance 

Ella Katherine Roberts Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Lois Mildred Rogers Clyde, R. 1, Haywood 

Christabel Lagette Sellers Lumberton, Robeson 

Sue Elizabeth Sewell Windsor, Bertie 

Ruth Elizabeth Shawf Richlands, Onslow 

Mary Louise Shepherd Durham, Durham 

Mary Elizabeth Shore Boonville, Yadkin 

Alice Elizabeth Sloop Mooresville, Iredell 

Dorothy Belle Smith Shelby, R. 1, Cleveland 

Grace Craver Smith Greensboro, Guilford 

Margaret McKenzie Smith Lincolnton, Lincoln 

Florence Cornelia Snow Kernersville, Forsyth 

Martha Louise Speas Pfafftown, Forsyth 

Frances Ellen Sprinkle Winston-Salem, R. 1, Forsyth 

Dorothy Dodd Stephenson Gumberry, Northampton 

Mary Clare Stokes Wilson, Wilson 

Susie Parrott Sugg Hookerton, Greene 

Rebecca Lois Swett Southern Pines, Moore 

Frances Jordan Tate Littleton, Warren 

Jaxie Catherine Temple Marietta, Robeson 

Lyall Nichols Temple Lake View, S. C. 

Martha Bynum Thomas Wadesboro, Anson 

Mary Virginia Thompson*! Wilson, Wilson 

Margaret Elizabeth Tippett Spencer, Rowan 

Frances Anderson Upchurch Oxford, Granville 

Mildred Vann Ahoskie, Hertford 

Katherine Louise Walsh Wilmington, New Hanover 



* Absent by permission, 
t Dated July 24, 1935. 



158 Th e Woman's College of the University of Noeth Carolina 

Alda Mae Weaver Spray, Rockingham 

Eleanor Palmer Welborn*t Greensboro, Guilford 

Susan White Asheville, Buncombe 

Selma Harding Whitehead Weldon, Halifax 

Doris Louise Wilkins Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Mary Anna Miller Wilkinson Marion, McDowell 

Reverie 0. Williams Aurora, Beaufort 

Nellie Elizabeth Williamson Princeton, N. J. 

Ophelia Blanche Wilson Guilford College, Guilford 

Bertha Dalton Wright Wilmington, New Hanover 

Elizabeth Harding Yates Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Francis Young Henderson, Vance 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Maria Elizabeth Bryan Raleigh, Wake 

Julia Kathleen Capps Areola, Warren 

Blanche Coley Stantonsburg, R. F. D., Wayne 

Mary Nettles Corbett Wilmington, New Hanover 

Catherine Winfield Davis Concord, Cabarrus 

Mildred Lillian Duff _ Glen Olden, Pa. 

Floy Greene Marshall, R. 2, Union 

Florence Elizabeth Harvell Weldon, Halifax 

Sara Elizabeth Howard Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Winifred Kernodle Elon College, Alamance 

Mary Helen Kirk Pleasant Garden, Guilford 

Edna Earle Lee*f Dunn, Hartnett 

Myrtle Ruth Lunsford Asheville, Buncombe 

Helen Lorraine Lynch Snow Hill, Greene 

Harriet Lee McGoogan St. Pauls, Robeson 

Mary Lucille Morris , ~ - Avondale, Rutherford 

Julia Daniel Rice Asheboro, Randolph 

Evelyn Terry Sharpe Greensboro, Guilford 

Edna Alene Starnes*t Monroe, R. 4, Union 

Josephine Tomlinson Black Creek, Wilson 

Alice Louise Watson Elm City, Wilson 

Ruth Evelyn Watson Red Springs, R. F. D., Hoke 

Olive Clarice Whitaker Julian, Randolph 

Ada Williams - New Bern, Craven 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Martha Magruder Boger Albemarle, Stanly 

Margaret Ruth Brown Cleveland, Rowan 

Margaret Amanda Franks Franklin, Macon 

Winifred Hardison Arapahoe, Pamlico 

Mary Louise Horney Greensboro, Guilford 

Mavis Mitchell Aulander, Bertie 

Laura Raye Owen Fairview, Buncombe 

Emerald Reynolds Horse Cave, Ky. 

Myrtle Smyre Rowe Newton, Catawba 

Anna Mae Smith Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nell Allen Stallings Louisburg, Franklin 



* Absent by permission, 
t Dated July 24, 1935. 



Commencement 159 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Anna Estelle Atkinson _ Greensboro, Guilford 

Ellen Elizabeth Biggs*f — , Lumberton, Robeson 

Margaret Booker Mount Airy, Surry 

Geraldine Bruce Cameron Jonesboro, Harnett 

Emma Katharine Cobb - McLeansville, Guilford 

Leslie Virginia Darden Plymouth, Washington 

Rosalie Eanes Aulander, Bertie 

Lawlos Edmundson _ Pikesville, Wayne 

Mary Womack Fitzgerald Wilson, Wilson 

Clara Louise Gattis » Durham, Durham 

Mildred German Boomer, Wilkes 

Mary Isabelle Gray _ Lumberton, Robeson 

Helen Louise Green - Florence, S. C. 

Eleanor Elizabeth Greever Burke's Garden, Va. 

Blanche Holt Gwyn Mount Airy, Surry 

Olive Holt Asheville, Buncombe 

Rebecca Bond Jeffress Greensboro, Guilford 

Grace Steele Jurney _ Turnersburg, Iredell 

Katherine Louise Keister Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Beatrice Knight ~ Greensboro, Gui If ord 

Virginia Langdon Linden, R. 1, Cumberland 

Miriam MacFadyen Pinetops, Edgecombe 

Sarah Elizabeth McGuire Franklin, Macon 

Lillian Grey Manning „ Raleigh, Wake 

Louise Pullen Matthews Randleman, Randolph 

Margaret Catherine Mayhew Mooresville, Iredell 

Miriam Miller Wilmington, New Hanover 

Elise Crumpler Monroe Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Marie Violetious Parker ~ Louisburg, Franklin 

Irby Clarice Shaw ... Greensboro, R. 2, Guilford 

Katherine Kendrick Sikes Albemarle, Stanly 

Mazie Hall Spinks Raleigh, Wake 

Sue Steele _ Stony Point, Iredell 

Eloise Taylor Greensboro, Guilford 

Janice Tetterton Plymouth, Washington 

Virginia Arminta Thayer High Point, Guilford 

Carolyn Louise Weill Greensboro, Guilford 

Elizabeth Osborne Whaley Greensboro, Guilford 

lone Agness Wright. Asheville, Buncombe 

Gwendolyn Elaine Zimmerman , Aberdeen, Moore 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

Gladys Winifred Black Thomasville, Davidson 

Virginia Christy Avondale, Rutherford 

Malinda Belle Connolly Taylorsville, Alexander 

Ann Lanier Crawley Norwood, Stanly 

Jane Backstrom Gaw _ Greensboro, Guilford 

Catherine Egbert Jameson Augusta, Ga. 

Lois Clyde King Durham, Durham 



* Absent by permission, 
t Dated July 24, 1935. 



160 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Elections from Class of 1936 

Elizabeth McDaniel Barineau Ruby Jane Keller 

Mary Reynolds Bradshaw Christiana McFadyen 

Sarah Elizabeth Buhmann Mary Catharine Proctor 

Mausleat Garrard Florence Cornelia Snow 

Betty Brown Griesinger Mary Clare Stokes 

Blanche Newsome Hardy Martha Bynum Thomas 

Rosabelle Hinton Elizabeth Harding Yates 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 

1936-1937 

Senior Class 218 

Junior Class 313 

Sophomore Class 379 

Freshman Class 612 

Commercial Class 249 

Special Students 58 

Total Regular Session — 1,829 

Summer Session, 1936 578 

Total Number Enrolled 2,407 

Number Counted Twice 159 



Training School Enrollment 385 

Training School Enrollment, Summer Session, 1936 109 



2,248 



494 
Total Enrollment, 1936-1937 2,742 



INDEX 



Academic and personnel committee 65 

Academic regulations 65 

Accounting, courses in 85, 86, 153 

Administrative council 9 

Admission of students 

to the College 50 

to advanced standing 53 

to Home Economics course 51 

to Music course 52 

to Physical Education course 51 

to Secretarial Administration course 51 

Advisers for freshmen and sophomores 65 

Alumnae and former students' association 39 

Anatomy and Physiology, courses in 78 

Application blanks 50 

Art, courses in 71 

Artist and lecture course 38 

Artists' recitals and concerts 150 

Astronomy, courses in 75, 116 

Athletic grounds 32 

Attendance 70 

Auditing „ 67 

Bachelor of Arts course, requirements for admission to 51 

Bachelor of Arts with a major in Music, curriculum for 147 

Bachelor of Science degree, courses leading to 

in Home Economics 58 

in Music 52 

in Physical Education 6 3 

in Secretarial Administration 64 

Bacteriology, courses in 79 

Band 151 

Biology, courses in 75 

Botany, courses in 76 

Buildings 29 

Business Education, courses in 139 

Business Law, course in 85 

Business teachers, professional courses for 139 

Carnegie Music library 149 

Certificates, teachers' 55 

Change of course 6 6 

Chapel exercises 38 

Chemistry, courses in 80 

Child Development, courses in Ill 

Choir, college vested " m 150 

Class chairmen 65,66 

Classical civilization " ' 82 

Classification, hours credit required for 68 

Clothing and Textiles, courses in """. 106 

Clubs 39 



162 The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

College 

buildings and grounds - 29 

calendar - 3 

establishment 28 

exclusion from ~ . 70 

history and organization 28 

Commercial department 152 

Committees of the Faculty 26 

Community life „ 37 

Course, change of 6 6 

Courses of instruction 7 1 

Credits 

extension 67 

statement of 6 8 

summer session 67 

Deficiencies, entrance 67 

Degree, courses leading to Bachelor of Science 

in Home Economics 58 

in Music - 58 

in Physical Education 63 

in Secretarial Administration _ 64 

Degrees conferred by the College 29 

Degrees conferred at the 44th commencement 155 

Departmental major 5 6 

Directions to new students ~ 50 

Dramatics 39 

Economics, courses in 8 4 

Education, courses in ^ 8 6 

Elementary Science, course in 79 

English, courses in ~ 92 

Enrollment, 1936-1937 160 

Entrance deficiencies ~ ~ 6 7 

Examinations 68 

comprehensive «. 57 

entrance 50 

proficiency 66 

reports of and grades 69 

Exclusion from College 70 

Expenses 43 

Extension 

credits 67 

division 42 

Faculty ^ 10 

standing committees of 2 6 

Fees „ 43 

laboratory „ 45 

Fellowships 4 6 

Fields of concentration 5 5 

Food and Nutrition, courses in 108 

French, courses in ^ 132 

Freshman week 6 5 

Geography, courses in 79 

German, courses in 100 

Government, student 3 7 



Index 163 

Graduate work 

in Business Education ~ 141 

in Home Economics 113 

Greek, courses in 82 

Gymnasium outfit 127 

Health, department of 101 

Health service _ 36 

High school music contest 151 

History, courses in 103 

Home Economics 

course leading to Bachelor of Science degree in 58 

courses in 106 

Home Economics education, courses in Ill 

Home Relationships, courses in Ill 

Honors courses 5 7 

Housing, courses in 109 

Hygiene, courses in 101 

Infirmary 36,37 

Instruction, courses of 71 

Institution Economics, courses in..... 112 

Interdepartmental major 54, 56 

Italian, courses in 137 

Laboratories 

Biology 32 

Chemistry ~ 33 

Home Economics 33 

Physics 33 

Play Production - 3 4 

Psychology .. ... 3 4 

Laboratory technicians 54, 57 

Latin, courses in 8 2 

Law, course in Business 85 

Lecture course 3 8 

Library _ 35 

Loan funds 4 6 

Madrigal club 151 

Master of Science degree 

in Business Education 141 

in Home Economics _ 113 

Mathematics, courses in 114 

Medical attention _ 3 6 

Museum, historical 3 4 

Music 

course leading to Bachelor of Science degree in 58 

courses in _ 116 

school of 143 

contest, high school , 151 

education course 149 

organ course 149 

piano course _ 147 

violin course 148 

voice course 148 



164 Thb Woman's College of the University of North Carolina 

Nature Study, course in 79 

New students, directions to 50 

Non-residents, tuition charges 4 3 

Observation of teaching, opportunities for 86 

Orchestra - 150 

Organizations and clubs 3 9 

Outdoor theatre , 3 2 

Painting 73 

Phi Beta Kappa 29, 40, 160 

Philosophy, courses in 122 

Photography, course in 128 

Physical Education 

course leading to Bachelor of Science degree in 63 

courses in 124 

Physicians, College 36,37 

Physics, courses in . 128 

Physiology, courses in ~ 78 

Placement bureau , 42, 154 

Play Production, course in 94 

Political Science, courses in 105 

Pre-medical major 57 

Pre-medical students 54 

Prescribed entrance requirements 51 

Proficiency examinations - - 6 6 

Public relations 42 

Publications 41 

Publications office 42 

Psychology, courses in *, 131 

Quality points 70 

Recital course 3 8 

Registration 66 

Regulations 

academic 65 

general , 66 

Religious life 3 8 

Reports - 69 

Requirements for the Bachelor degree 54 

Requirements for admission 

to Bachelor of Arts course 51 

to Bachelor of Science course 

in Home Economics 51 

in Music _ 52 

in Physical Education 51 

in Secretarial Administration 51 

Requirements, residence 70 

Residence halls 31 

Residence requirements 70 

Romance Languages, courses in , 132 

Scholarships 46 

Science, course in Elementary 79 

Sculpture, course in 73 



Index 165 

Secretarial Administration, course leading to Bachelor of Science 

degree in 64 

Secretarial Science, courses in 137 

Self-help 42 

Shorthand 152 

Social life 3 8 

Societies - 40 

Sociology, courses in 141 

Spanish, courses in 135 

Stenotypy 152 

Student recitals 150 

Subjects accepted for entrance 50 

Supervised teaching 86, 90 

Teaching under supervision 86, 90 

Text books 4 5 

Trustees, Board of „ 5 

Tuition charges 4 3 

Typewriting 153 

Vaccination, required 36, 50 

Vocational subjects for entrance 51 

X-ray Technique, course in 130 

Young Women's Christian Association 38, 40 

Zoology, courses in 77